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I had a mare with severe Cushings that was very sure footed, right to the end, so not all Cushings horses are uncoordinated.

I did know someone with a gelding that developed progressively worse tripping issues. He had a poor fitting saddle and with chiro and a proper saddle fitting he got better. But then he started getting worse again. He would trip constantly at all gaits and went down with a rider multiple times. He was retired and euthanized because he was tripping in the pasture and injuring himself. The vet figured cancer impacting his spine.

I would check his back, do a lameness exam, make sure his feet are well trimed and check saddle fit. If all those check out and he's still tripping with a rider he should be retired from riding completely.
 

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i didnt even think about the cushions disease . someone else had mentioned about that they noticed one night on how he was standing made them think he had cushions
CushINGS(I guess spell check changed to cushion!) is a condition that effects metabolism and immune system generally. It does not of itself cause lameness. But lameness may be secondary, because metabolic & immune system probs can cause laminitis, and this is unfortunately very commonly seen in PPID(cushings) horses. Not sure whether it's a 'chicken or egg' thing. And of course, keratin can be on 'hypergrowth', and hoof wall is made of keratin, not just the hair coat.

But as Kalraii said, if it's really extreme/severe, then it does have an effect on their gait & balance. Thankfully I have only ever seen this degree once in my years of farriery, but we actually thought the horse had stringhalt.
 

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OP, I would not wait to retire a horse from riding that was tripping. It would be better to retire the horse and then in the future if something was found that was fixable, you could consider it again. That is if the horse no longer is seen tripping without a rider at all. What your horse has sounds serious and permanent.
My mare did not trip more than what I thought was minor, but one day she went flat on her face with a rider and the rider went straight onto her head. It happened in an instant. The rider had a bad concussion but could easily have severed her spinal chord or been killed. Horses that go down are very unsafe to ride, even at the walk if a horse trips they can cause a traumatic brain injury that will disable a person permanently. If you care about your boyfriend, do not let him ride this horse. My mare's diagnosis ended up being spinal arthritis that made her gait unsteady at times. It was not something that was noticeable and was only starting to show up when she fell.
 

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Pepper is a 15 year old Standardbred cross with Quarter Horse .
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Well this is interesting, for lack of a better word. One older horse here has cushings when I talked to the girl that grew up on him she actually urged the owner (a good friend of hers and like family) to get tested for cushions because over time he forgot how to canter and was completely disconnected in all gaits - sluggish and not with it, were also her words. Normally when I've seen cushings its the other other typical symptoms y'know like their hair, the fatty bits and the urine//thirst. Laminitis etc. Turns out his levels were so high he shouldn't have been standing, according the vet. Owner said the same when I talked about it with her. I had no idea how advanced cases could affect them like this... She said after they started the meds he went back to his normal self and I got taken on an involuntary gallop alongside him a few months ago and he looked good when out to my eye and since. It could be something else ofc - mechanical, neurological etc..

You need to get to the bottom of it somehow just not safe.

It worries me when vets tell me somethings not necessary when I'm willing to throw money at them for peace of mind :< Hope you figure it out and resolve it!
Thanks me too. I also did some research as he is very narrow based in front. Which they said that it's very common for horses with this issue to stumble and go down like hes doing. And it also describes him to a t . I found a lot of information on base narrow and it's common for them to be pigeon toed as well. I just dont know what to do with maintenance on a horse with this issue. I know I've always been told with horses with pigeon toes on older horses to just leave it be otherwise you try and fix it , it would make things worse .and from what I'm reading up sounds like base narrow is the same way .:( but with him stumbling like he does makes me wonder if he isn't lame on the front ? Other then he is so moody he doesn't act like hes in pain .
 

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Pepper is a 15 year old Standardbred cross with Quarter Horse .
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
OP, I would not wait to retire a horse from riding that was tripping. It would be better to retire the horse and then in the future if something was found that was fixable, you could consider it again. That is if the horse no longer is seen tripping without a rider at all. What your horse has sounds serious and permanent.
My mare did not trip more than what I thought was minor, but one day she went flat on her face with a rider and the rider went straight onto her head. It happened in an instant. The rider had a bad concussion but could easily have severed her spinal chord or been killed. Horses that go down are very unsafe to ride, even at the walk if a horse trips they can cause a traumatic brain injury that will disable a person permanently. If you care about your boyfriend, do not let him ride this horse. My mare's diagnosis ended up being spinal arthritis that made her gait unsteady at times. It was not something that was noticeable and was only starting to show up when she fell.
He doesn't get rode as much as he should be. Mainly cuz back in the summer and spring he coughs way to much till winter hits . And my concern about the stumbling made me hesitant go work him. But my farrier told me that he was fine to ride him that he was sound . That there wasnt really much I can do for his poor conformation that he has in the front. The only issue is he gets bored and a severe attitude when not worked or rode . And hes extremely buddy sour hates being alone . Granted after all that' he has been through it's no wonder . He was one of the worst case of neglect I had ever taken in . He also has this weird habit of when he eats he takes a bite of food spins in a circle after each bite . He does this till he has ate all his food. He does this in the stall out in the field, where ever he is eating at .even when he eats hay he does this. My boyfriend didnt believe me at first when I kept mentioning my concerns about him stumbling it wasnt till after I got other ppl on pepper to ride him and it took them telling him that something was off with him that I wasnt being paranoid to finally. We checked the saddle to see if maybe it was the saddle pinching him and making him stumble but no matter what saddle he is rode in he stumbled. So that got ruled out . The only test I havnt done with him was have his front hooves tested for heel pain . Which I told my friend that is boarding him for me shes going to have her farrier and vet check his feet. Shes trying to help me figure out what's wrong him as well. Hopefully we get some answers and its an easy fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Hope you don't mind me asking what do you mean moody? What sort of things does he do?
Dont mind at all. He acts like a grumpy old mare all the time. When he first came in to the rescue he was a bit aggressive . And would explode under pressure. Very disrespectful.and would constantly keep his ears pinned back. Especially when it came to feeding time. Sometimes he can be sweet but most of the time he is grumpy and pins his ears and will try an bite you . I took him to several trainers to try and work out his attitude. one of the trainers he charged at her aggressively and told me that it would be best to have him put down.i lost count on how many trainers came out to work with him. Finally realizing something else was most likely going on and trying to get to the bottom of his attitude I finally was able to get a equine dentist to come out and discovered he had so much mouth issues that it was no wonder he would explode under pressure. Got that fixed and he's almost a normal sweet gelding . But he does act studish and will mount mares . He doesn't do well with geldings. and he will still occassionally keep his ears pinned back . I even went as far as tracking down his original owner that's how I found out that he was owned by a soldier who up and left him for dead. The landlord found him and got him on his feet and gave him to this girl who ended up bouncing him all over the place and everyone that I've talked to said that he was always kept by himself away from other livestock and that he was a crazy horse and would break their fences down or tried to jump the fences. She also told me that he used to be the sweetest horse and was one of the best kids horses . But he can be a handful at times .
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I had a mare with severe Cushings that was very sure footed, right to the end, so not all Cushings horses are uncoordinated.

I did know someone with a gelding that developed progressively worse tripping issues. He had a poor fitting saddle and with chiro and a proper saddle fitting he got better. But then he started getting worse again. He would trip constantly at all gaits and went down with a rider multiple times. He was retired and euthanized because he was tripping in the pasture and injuring himself. The vet figured cancer impacting his spine.

I would check his back, do a lameness exam, make sure his feet are well trimed and check saddle fit. If all those check out and he's still tripping with a rider he should be retired from riding completely.
That's a good idea. And I've already ruled out the saddle fitting that was my first thought. But I'm definitely going to have him hauled back to the vet and do an lameness examination on him. Better be safe then sorry. He's already fell once with a rider thankfully both were ok and we did the profile health bloodtest and a few months of rest . Took him back to the vet and had him reexamine blood test and it came back that he was clear everything looked good. Sigh I did noticed that I'm having issues with building his topline up . And he does kick himself in the front alot so he has to wear leg wraps or over reach boots to protect his feet. And he doesn't do well on stall rest as he tends to stock up quickly . Hes a hard keeper I am constantly struggling with keeping his weight up . In the spring and summer it gets worse as he has heaves. Maybe just retiring him to a pasture pet would be the best thing for him but I live on a small acre lot. Not really enough space for him as he is a very hyper. And needs a job as he can be destructive sigh. I'm eventually moving out once we are able to find a place with more land and can afford it. My friend that has him boarded at her place had mentioned that he just may need training and therapy ? To help him pick up his feet more.not sure if that would help or not . But we are slowly going down the list of things to try with him.
 
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