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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I about fell over when I noticed these distinct ripples on my horses hooves yesterday. The farrier was already scheduled to come today so that was good. I asked him but he didn't seem too concerned and said they were just 'fever' rings. She is not ouchy, not lame, not overweight, maybe a bit of a hay belly. She gets no sweet feed- just less than 1 lb of pellets with some supplements and 24/7 turnout on pretty low quality pasture.

The rippley growth rings look to have started exactly when I bought her- almost 3 months ago. Everything in her world changed at that time so I am really hoping they could be from stress? (She was moved to different pasture, new pasture mate, increase in work, and changes in diet)

The thing that scares me is that I would think an 'event' ring would be just that- one abnormal growth ring. To me it looks like the hoof is growing in ripples right now.

:( :( I am so worried.

Note: hoof angle looks really upright but she was on uneven ground, it's not that upright in person, I'll do another thread about trim, but I'm just concerned about the ripples now. They are on all four feet but this shows it best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How to you tell the difference in just stress/fever/event rings and laminitis rings? all the pics appear the same it me. Is it just a matter of the symptoms?
 

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If she's not sore footed chances are the rings are from deit change. Just keep an eye on her if she starts getting sore footed then id worry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sent this pic to a really experienced horse friend and he said they are concussion rings- from work on hard surfaces. This makes sense as she was not in work prior to me buying her and I've been riding her a lot and on asphalt.
 

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They are pretty significant rings. Couldbe stress, weather change, diet change, or even small laminitic episodes.

What were her feet like 3 months ago? She has very high heels. Has the farrier been addressing that?
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They are pretty significant rings. Couldbe stress, weather change, diet change, or even small laminitic episodes.

What were her feet like 3 months ago? She has very high heels. Has the farrier been addressing that?
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No, these rings are distinctly new and you can see the smoothness below.

Like I said, all of the above (diet, owner, workload) changed at the same time, so stress could very well be the issue. The first two weeks with me she was distinctly freaked out but then she settled into her new life. She was free in the pasture for the first time (maybe ever), previously she was just tied. She is now in pasture with a pretty strong mannered gelding (alone before) she's the low man on the totem pole and she's also gone into heat about 3 times (triggered by being with him I think).

I think the angle is just bad in that picture, her heels aren't as high as they look there. When I can get some accurate hoof pics I'll post them.
 

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Hi,

I think you are right to be concerned, altho no need for 'panic stations'. Those are some pretty significant rings & whatever stress that's caused them has been happening regularly in the last 2-3 months.

As you've seen an eg of here, people have frequently discounted these type of signs as 'growth rings' 'grass rings', etc, etc although it of course has also been recognised as a sign of laminitis. So no wonder you're confused about it! The way I see it, at the base level, ANY rings & ridges - or pink rings in white hooves - signify a laminitic 'episode'. However, the degree & longevity of the 'attack' may be extremely mild & apart from the rings, a relative non-event. Laminitis is commonly brought on from diet/metabolic issues, but it can also be mechanical, due to physical or mental stress, or toxins - drugs, gut damage, etc.

So... look up 'low grade' or 'sub clinical' laminitis for more info. Major laminitis 'attacks' & founder very rarely come suddenly 'out of the blue' and as I said, don't panic, but if you can learn to recognise & consider these 'mild' symptoms, in the majority of situations, any major laminitis can then be avoided.

While you're at that, I would also start learning about hoof form & function, because while that picture isn't great for accuracy, I agree with others that it looks like those heels are significantly high & also contracted & run forward - your horse is heading for soundness issues if left like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks loose you always have good info- I'll be sure to photograph those feet for info on the angles.

What do you think about the 'concussion rings' idea? Shouldn't correct shoeing keep those at bay?
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Concussion can absolutely be a cause of stress to laminae & subsequent wall deviations/founder. Imbalance & overloading the walls is generally a contributor. Depends how it's done, but I'd be avoiding shoes on a laminitic horse, especially if concussion is an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I did see some of the discussions on sub-clinical laminitis on here as well as some other sites when I was researching.... Rode today and I did notice that it was really hard to keep her in a gait. She's a natural bred paso fino so the gait is her natural stride, she normally only breaks to a trot when she's really tired. Today it was all trot. I'm going to give her some days off and keep a close eye...

Since there's nothing striking in her diet per se that could be causing this, what is the suggested course of action? I could completely eliminate her pellets or I could take her off pasture and just do hay...reduce/eliminate work... It's hard for me to take a wait and see approach...
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Yes, regardless of any discomfort(& 'laziness' is often an indication) I wouldn't be asking her to go above a walk on asphalt if she is peripherally loaded &/or her feet are imbalanced - as said, with only that pic to go on, hard to tell, but it appears....

Re her diet, without more info, don't know whether 1lb pellets problematic. Or the pasture. Or hay, which is, after all, made from pasture & doesn't lose sugars in processing. Depends how sensitive she may be to sugars, etc too.
 

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Mine did exactly that. We had changed barns, and we had a shower every day all summer, and the rings showed up. Even the coronary band was more noticeable. Turns out, between the rain, change in diet, and change in hoof care, they appeared overnight.

Turns out the metabolic part let the outer hoof grow faster than the inner hoof, therefore needing to "ripple". I rounded the edges off her feet (she had also come out of 12 weeks of shoes). Nice mustang roll. And within a few days, they literally disappeared. Try getting the outer wall up off the ground a bit and see what happens. You see results real fast because hooves are a large percentage of water.

Don't worry. It already kept me up at night when it happened.
 

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It was noticed on 10-1-13. By 10/14/13 , they almost went away on their own. 6 weeks ago, since I rolled her edges better on 10-14, now, she has very light rings, the ripples are gone, and her quarters let themselves down and straight horizontally. This picture was on 10/14, 2 weeks after being really ripple-y.

Too bad I don't have pics when they looked more like yours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks princess I'll look into that- good to hear you had a similar situation and it went well
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Turns out the metabolic part let the outer hoof grow faster than the inner hoof, therefore needing to "ripple". ....You see results real fast because hooves are a large percentage of water.
Just being particular.... The outer hoof wall grows down from the coronary border & is impervious & dry(one reason 'moisturisers' aren't beneficial. It's not designed for weight bearing & tends to grow at a relatively uniform rate. The inner wall grows out from the laminae and has a high degree of water. It's more flexible and is the part of the wall that naturally shares weight bearing. It also responds quickly to metabolic &/or mechanical changes & stresses, the laminae dividing & putting out extra material when/where needed.
 

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Just being particular.... The outer hoof wall grows down from the coronary border & is impervious & dry(one reason 'moisturisers' aren't beneficial. It's not designed for weight bearing & tends to grow at a relatively uniform rate. The inner wall grows out from the laminae and has a high degree of water. It's more flexible and is the part of the wall that naturally shares weight bearing. It also responds quickly to metabolic &/or mechanical changes & stresses, the laminae dividing & putting out extra material when/where needed.

Oh my!!! As you know , Loosie, I'm not a detail-oriented writer, LOL. Your words here are all the stuff I left out, LOL!
 

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Thanks princess I'll look into that- good to hear you had a similar situation and it went well
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Like Loosie was saying, hooves contain a lot of water, that's why you'll see the problem correcting itself pretty quick when that outer wall is rolled up a bit. Be sure to take the transformation pics.

Even when I get a curve in the horizontal lines on the quarters, once I relieve the quarters, the lines straighten out in 1-3 days.

What was really funny with the ripples I had was that I rolled the edges off the ground, 2 days later they were back on the ground from that outer wall relaxing. And I had to roll them again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Like Loosie was saying, hooves contain a lot of water, that's why you'll see the problem correcting itself pretty quick when that outer wall is rolled up a bit. Be sure to take the transformation pics.

Even when I get a curve in the horizontal lines on the quarters, once I relieve the quarters, the lines straighten out in 1-3 days.

What was really funny with the ripples I had was that I rolled the edges off the ground, 2 days later they were back on the ground from that outer wall relaxing. And I had to roll them again.
She just got new shoes..... :-( She'd have to be barefoot for me to keep doing the right? I noticed on the first shoeing that The farrier did really strong roll, this time not as much... :?
 
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