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Discussion Starter #1
I've heard do's and don'ts about an equine science degree. I am an Air Force wife and have been currently looking at schools online that offer the program. Currently I train horses and I make good money doing so but I want to take it a step further. Equine Chiropractor has really stuck out to me, one of my horses has a back issue and it caused me to do more research and I just kept wanting to learn more! Is there job security in this field and does it pay well? Are there other options that I would have with this degree that might offer me job stability and a decent salary? Is an Equine Science degree worth it or will I just be paying $20,000 and end up having to find another job that has nothing to do with horses because the others don't pay well or I can't find an opening?
 

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IMO a degree is just a pretty piece of paper in the horse world. People are going to hire because of experience, not because of paper. You'd be better off taking that $20,000 and putting it toward trainer under a really well known trainer. They horse world is all about experience and who you know.
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I think you don't have to take equine science at all (here in Ireland) to become an equine chiropractor. You need to study the human body in college, then go and qualify as an actual chiropractor for horses, outside of college.
 

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I agree with Slide, despite having a Bachelor's Degree in Equine Science & Training, lol!

I triple-majored in Equine Business Mgmt, Equine Science & Training, and straight up Business, to cover all my bases. I currently work in the city, while my business degree pays for me to have a horse as a hobby. That said, I ADORED my equine university experience and it opened my eyes to the horse world in a way I would never have seen if I remained in my little town with my far-from-the-big-leagues horse scene. After graduation I went to work for a big name trainer and loved it, but within a few years I had decided horse training wasn't my true calling.

Incidentally, I graduated in 2001 and am still paying off my student loans ;) I'd have considerably more left to payoff if I was still working at the ranch, as I was making about 40% of my current salary.
 
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Equine Science will not qualify you to be a chiropractor. If that's what you want to do you need to research the requirements for it - they vary. Some places require you to to to equine chiro school, some require human chiro certification first then equine.

Equine Science is typically the degree people get when they want to run a boarding facility or teach lessons or train. I was always told it was fairly useless to get though.
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I agree with all of the above.

I would think the best think you could do if you want to be a chiropractor is either go through vet school (probably not realistic), or apprentice under someone.
 

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You could do equine massage therapy. Chiropractor's must be a vet where I live so that probably isn't feasible.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Massage therapists have to be a vet here too, as well as the next state that we will be moving to next year. After looking at the state laws, everywhere is different and being an Air Force spouse I will constantly be moving. I don't think that I will be able to do any of the things I want to do until he gets out in 5 years and we move back to TN.
 

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What about getting a degree in business? That you can take anywhere! Not to mention it's going to look stellar on an application paired with horse experience.
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I also have a degree in Equine Science and Managment.......the most useless piece of paper I have and the most expensive. Granted I learned alot about the equine and thier workings but it got me little to no where in the job market. I was extremely disappointed. I was on the school's riding team and took several training classes though not nessesarily target classes to complete the degree. I learned alot on what NOT to do so that helped greatly. I eventually got a degree in Biology (but who the heck needs a biologist?.............nobody). So I say go into something specific. If chiropracty is your quest then go into that. If you just want to learn general information on horses or just want to have a degree in equine science to broaden or compliment your equine chiropractic quest then go for it. Equine Science by itself is pretty much just a piece of paper. Equine chiropacty requirements differ a little from state to state. Look into what your state says you need to have before taking classes. Getting a bussiness degree might end up helping you more.
 
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I eventually got a degree in Biology (but who the heck needs a biologist?.............nobody).
Here in WY a bachelor's in Biology is pretty marketable.

Mines, other energy industries, and water testing labs all hire people with that degree and they pay pretty well.

Or, some kids I know who got a bachelor's in Biology then get an RN in nursing and, as they tell me, "can rule the world!" lol They get the better nursing jobs.

Other careers here that hire that are purebred cattle and horse outfits, some large farms, places that raise and sell pheasants or trout.

Zaney Zanne - you might need to hit the Rocky Mtn region!

But I agree that a degree in Business is more marketable than about any other.
 

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In NC there are colleges and some horse barns that offer Equine Chiropractic classes for somewhere around $100 to $300 dollars. Not sure where your located but I would research it.
 

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I will say though, I've personally seen people with degrees totally unrelated to a job with no experience beat out people with no degree and have experience.
Absolutely true in the corporate world - many companies won't even interview someone who doesn't have a degree. They don't care what the degree is in, just that you took the initiative to pursue further education.
 

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As another holder of a worthless Equine degree please don't waste your time and money with it. No one in the horse world respects an equine degree and the colleges won't ever tell you that no one gets a job except maybe as a lowly stall cleaner/hot walker. (at less than minimum wage)
There are some good schools out there for Equine Massage, Dentistry and Chiropractic but you have to be careful to weed out the scams. To actually learn how to do it you should work as an apprentice under someone for a period of time. The massage therapy and chiropractic are very popular in my area, (personally I don't believe in it) but the ladies that do it own their own business, drive beautiful trucks, set their own hours and then go home and enjoy their own horses. Just bear in mind that the Dentistry part is plain old hard physical work-I've been amazed at how hard these dentists work watching them go through a barn and do 10 horses!
PS: in our state none of these professions require vet school, it must vary from state to state.
 

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It is mostly worthless.

The horse industry is tough. In a few years of stall mucking, horse training, getting stepped on, thrown off etc, you body just won't hold up. Then what do you do? Go back to school for a new career if you can afford it. Get a low paying job if you can't go back to school.

If you want to go into the nutrition field you might find jobs related to animal nutrition, but definitely plan on getting a master's degree.

I got a degree in equine science because I had almost $10,000 in scholarships which were only good towards an equine degree. Only now I may need to go back so I can change careers and get into something that pays better. I must point out that this covered 100% of my tuition so I don't have student loans.

The good news is my core classes are covered, and I took a lot of science classes so those should all transfer if I decide I want a second degree. They also offer accelerated master's (basically if you have a bachelor's degree but want to change careers, they give you an intensive program combining undergrad level classes with grad level classes so you get a Master's without starting over). Still it is very intensive!

Since you are just starting out you can also try doing a double major- just plan on going to school every summer session with no breaks!

I almost think high school students should take a year or two break before college and just work. Very few people go to school and get a job in what they majored in. My cousin's majored in Music- one is a supervisor at Starbucks, and the other works at a bank. Definitely not what they envisioned!

I am starting on an entirely new career path- I just have no clue what that path might be! :shock: Currently I am researching the job market in this area- I would rather not relocate.
 

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I almost think high school students should take a year or two break before college and just work.
I couldn't possibly disagree with this statement any more!

Most of those people who "take a few years off" before starting college never get around to going back. Finish school while you're still in the mindset of going to class everyday, and while all your high school learning is still fresh in your mind so you don't have to pay for non-credit-counting refresher courses in algebra or microeconomics. Once you start receiving a fulltime paycheck, you're not going to want to give it up to go back to school - even if going back to school could eventually result in a higher paycheck.
 

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Cynical- In some countries it is "normal" to take some time off before college to work/volunteer and get a better idea of what your interests are.

It certainly is better to take some time off before getting into a degree and then realizing that degree/career path is not for you. I've had several friends end up in that same situation- either starting over in a different degree, or ending up changing careers. This ends up costing them a lot of money in wasted tuition.

https://college.harvard.edu/admissions/preparing-college/should-i-take-time
 

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There is an equine science program at my college. I've only seen the riding majors, but I'm not impressed with the riding and training techniques at all. You could learn just as much being a working student under a decent trainer.
 
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