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Not sure where to put this thread, hopefully this fits here!

Little bit of background about me before the real question:

Long story short, it has been a long time since I had a horse, mainly due to where I'm living currently. But great news is that my family has bought property with acreage in southern Idaho, which will finally allow me to have horses! I will move in the spring, and I'm already super anxious and ready to get a horse (in a way my first horse that I can ride!). And I have a specific horse in mind that I envision myself riding, and seeing one makes my heart flutter with joy, and that would be a Paint patterned horse. :loveshower: To be more specific, a gelding around 15+ hands with any base color with a suitable temperament for western riding. For me, a Paint/Pinto would describe my personality. As an artist who mainly oil paints, the fact that my horse would be a paint is just so fitting. Also I find paints/pintos to be super eye-catching and flashy. That's why I'm crazy fixated on getting a paint/pinto if you're wondering.

Here's my question: Is it wrong that I only want a Paint/other breed with pinto pattern?

I know that you shouldn't just buy a horse for color or looks, I totally get where people are coming from. Obviously if I had no choice but to choose between an unbroke paint or a gentle and well-trained horse of another color, I'd go for the latter. But that doesn't mean I can't be picky right? I've seen many paint horses for sale in Idaho that fit my criteria, so I feel like this is a reasonable request. I have literally searched this question, and I barely found anything about it, only that you DON'T buy just for color. So to sum it up, paints hold a special place in my heart, so is it a crime to basically buy one with the looks in mind?

Also if you own a paint horse, did you buy it because of it's color or you just happened to get one without that intention?
 

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Welcome to the Forum....


From my point of view...no, its not wrong to want a horse, specifically a paint patterned horse to be yours.
The fact you want it to do certain things, meet certain expectations just makes you sound to me that although you want a paint it must still meet particular criteria for a riding companion too.
You haven't limited yourself except for a coat color...
I didn't hear you mention breed or bloodline or, or, or more or....
You never limited yourself in my eyes...
A 15 hand gelding that will ride western with a "paint" colored coat....leaves you a ton of horses to look at.

You asked, " if you own a paint horse, did you buy it because of it's color or you just happened to get one without that intention?"
We own one now and have had several paints in the past....
All rode and rode differently, one a Quarter Horse bloodline, another a Appaloosa crossed and one was a papered Thoroughbred...but they all had color.. Brown & White, Black & White, Tri-Color and the last one was a honey palomino and white mix...all paints.
The one we have currently, my husband fell in love with seeing him stand in a field for a year..
When his owner decided they wanted to sell and knew we were smitten with his personality we jumped and bought never sitting on the horse...
We lucked out as he is nice a ride as his personality is...sigh.
You don't normally just buy color, in this case we did with personality mixed in and did not regret it. :smile:
:runninghorse2:...


Moderator Note:
The moderation team has removed a poster who has created problems in the past from posting, hence some edits took place in responses made following.
We apologize for the interruption of a nice ongoing thread and ask for our members understanding in this matter.
Thank-you.
 

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Keeping in mind that I have never bought a horse (yet)... Nah, I don't see any reason why that's a problem. That rule is to stop people from doing something dumb. You know what you want and won't make a dumb decision. You want your horse to be safe and well-suited to you. If you can find a pinto that otherwise meets your requirements, and the two of you get along, then hooray!



Also, the American Paint is technically a breed, not just a coloration. (All Paints are pintos, but not all pintos are Paints. If that makes sense...) Breed is certainly something that's valid to take into account. So that's another thing to consider. So... do you want a Paint, or would you be happy with a pinto Morgan or Quarter Horse? Either way is valid, IMO, it's just something to figure out.
 

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If you want a paint or pinto markings then go for it. You don't seem to think that any pinto will do so keep on looking until you find the whole package.

My stepmom has always loved red horses, my dad has always loved buckskins. and so on. Nothing wrong with having your preference.

Pinto markings are not exactly rare so I'm sure you will find the horse you love with pinto markings.
 

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I always dreamed of owning a black and white paint! I haven't had one yet but I'm sure someday one might find it's way into my barn! I never bought for color specifically but I my absolute dream horse was always a buckskin and I used to always shop the classifieds just to look at them. One day I ran across a baby that just, I don't know. I wasn't really shopping for one and then suddenly I was driving 4 hours just to look at him... and then.... I was driving 4 hours to pick him up! LOL

There is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting a specific breed or color. The breed is easy. You want a quarter horse, you shop only quarter horses, you want a paint - you look at paints. What you do have to be careful about though is ensuring that you buy the paint that is suitable for you, not the one that is picture perfect if that makes sense.
 

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I definitely think it's a bad idea particularly for a first horse. You sound very excited and eager, and very romantic. Those are the exact emotions you should leave at home in a locked box when you go looking for a horse. What you need to shop for a horse is a hard head, a suspicious attitude, and a ton of realism about what you need in a horse. My guess is your number one need is for a gentle, calm, safe, well-trained animal. Your second need is for a horse that vet checks out sound. Every other consideration should be far down the list.

I read a story in grade school called The Superior Horse, a retelling of a Chinese folk tale. In it the emperor of China asks his old and famous manager of his stud to find him the best horse in China. The old man tells him that he knows a boy who is the best judge of a horse in the country and that the emperor should send the boy to look for this horse. So the Emperor does, and the boy comes back in a year with the horse. The emperor eagerly asks the boy what horse he has found, and the boy says, "oh, it's a dun mare." The emperor commands that the next day his finest charger will race the dun mare to see which is better. He is enraged when he discovers that it is not a dun mare at all, but a black stallion! The race is held, and the emperor's charger, trying to win but failing, falls down dead of a burst heart.

The emperor's old stableman explains that the boy does not see the outside of the horse, but only his true qualities, which are hidden. So he doesn't even remember what color or sex the horse is.

This story has remained in my memory for many decades now, after the thousands of other horse stories I read at that time blurred and faded. It wasn't really about horses, of course, but I still think it makes my point for me.
 

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I have a quarter horse paint... yep it's a registered APHA and the pinto just because... but I think there's 1 paint in the grandparents... the rest quarter horse... some old school... so I call him a quarter horse paint.

My black and white overo I am pretty sure it was from the crop out days, his dad had too much white. His papers are all pretty much quarter horse. But registered APHA...

I bought for color but also looked at bloodlines to make sure they meshed...
 

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My opinion is colored by a pasture mate horse to mine, a big, gorgeous, flashy, blue-eyed sorrel overo mare who was also not pasture sound unless shod, bucked whenever she was loped, and generally was only useful for looking at and spending money on. That was really all her owner wanted, but I did despise her some for it.
 

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The best horse I ever owned was a Tobiano mare that was broke early by a neighbor. Toby was a very calm, sensible horse that used the thinking side of her brain instead of the reactive side. She was so smart and loving. Never once put me in a bind. I took her to Colorado elk hunting as a long two year old. Got into terrible dead fall pines and I stopped her to look around for a way around them. Next thing I know without asking she picked up one foot at a time crossing the first downed tree sliding her belly across it then followed with her hind feet with me aboard and continued on crossing everyone in the trail. Taking her time and working her way thru methodically. She matured to 15H and 1100#. She was ridden by two of my daughters in 4H drill team and in many parades as a 3 &4 yo. Worked cows like a champ and would do anything I asked in pastures, woods and trails. I logged countless miles along roads with her paying no mind to traffic. I started teaching her to open gates when she was 6-7 yo and one day I was at work and she opened the gate on a (cattle) crowding tub and got her head stuck breaking her neck. When I came home and found her I sat on her hindquarters and wept. Then I had the chore of burying her. I have always loved paints since. My current 3 yo is a paint/ line back dun cross and she is working out wonderful although a little headstrong but, I am seeing a little of Toby in her. I hope she turns out as well. If you like paints , shop smart and pick a good one. There is one out there just like you want. Good luck and you will find it.
 

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As long as you stick to priorities, there is nothing wrong with holding out for the color you want as “icing on the cake”. I recently bought a black and white spotted TWH. I wasn’t going to settle for any other color than either that or a buckskin. Now, having said that, I already have a couple of other horses so knew that I could hold out for what I wanted. Seems like you have some time to shop and educate yourself on confirmation, health, etc so should be able to find that dream horse.
 

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I would suggest making a list of what qualities you need in a horse, and then prioritize them.

Where horse people get critical is when they can see a person has obviously placed a flashy color over things that are far more important, such as good hooves so the horse will stay sound or straight legs.

Let's say you have a dozen things on your list such as size, good hooves, age, good teeth, straight legs, nice movement, well trained for your level of riding, sex, calm personality, and the color you want.

Now you look around at horses and none have everything you want. That is where you will need to either wait for just the right one or else decide some things are not as important. Health and personality should always come first.

People are known to look at color and ignore everything else. You can see animals used for breeding that are unusual and flashy colors but have serious conformation and genetic problems. Because of this you need to be extra careful when looking at colorful horses for sale, because the breeder may have passed some bad traits on while trying for color.

I've had friends who wanted color but could not find a good horse so gave up. I've had other friends who bought a horse with a high priority on color, glossed over the horse's other issues and ended up unhappy with the horse. This is why people advise you it may not be best to have your heart set on a certain color.
 

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It is quite funny how different things are around the world. In my part of the world paint horses aren't particularly desirable and are somewhat looked down upon. A proper horse is black, brown or gray - everything else is "peasant" stock. I don't really like paint horses (for other reasons, not the local fashion - their patterns always stop me from seeing conformation properly) but I ended up with a paint because of her temperament.

I would say that a paint that does western leaves you with a lot of options. If you were looking for a paint to jump with that would be a bit different. There aren't that many of such horses around.
 

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I think you'd be better to looking for health and suitability before colour, however, if there are plenty of them in your area. you may be lucky and find one that fits your criteria.

I grew up hearing that coloured, or white faces with long socks were undesirable as they were, or looked like, common working animals and that chestnuts should be avoided, especially if they're mares. None of mine were bought on the basis of breed, gender or colour, yet I still managed to get one with a difficult temperament.

I admit that I'm not a fan of most of our coloured horses, mainly due to our market being flooded with poor quality Vanners. I've been scrolling through adverts and every second one seems to be for a coloured cob. There's also an increasing number requesting horses that say 'no greys'.
 
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Not sure where to put this thread, hopefully this fits here!

Little bit of background about me before the real question:

Long story short, it has been a long time since I had a horse, mainly due to where I'm living currently. But great news is that my family has bought property with acreage in southern Idaho, which will finally allow me to have horses! I will move in the spring, and I'm already super anxious and ready to get a horse (in a way my first horse that I can ride!). And I have a specific horse in mind that I envision myself riding, and seeing one makes my heart flutter with joy, and that would be a Paint patterned horse. :loveshower: To be more specific, a gelding around 15+ hands with any base color with a suitable temperament for western riding. For me, a Paint/Pinto would describe my personality. As an artist who mainly oil paints, the fact that my horse would be a paint is just so fitting. Also I find paints/pintos to be super eye-catching and flashy. That's why I'm crazy fixated on getting a paint/pinto if you're wondering.

Here's my question: Is it wrong that I only want a Paint/other breed with pinto pattern?

I know that you shouldn't just buy a horse for color or looks, I totally get where people are coming from. Obviously if I had no choice but to choose between an unbroke paint or a gentle and well-trained horse of another color, I'd go for the latter. But that doesn't mean I can't be picky right? I've seen many paint horses for sale in Idaho that fit my criteria, so I feel like this is a reasonable request. I have literally searched this question, and I barely found anything about it, only that you DON'T buy just for color. So to sum it up, paints hold a special place in my heart, so is it a crime to basically buy one with the looks in mind?

Also if you own a paint horse, did you buy it because of it's color or you just happened to get one without that intention?
If a Paint horse is what makes your heart go pitter-pat, then go for it! I don't think you will have any issue finding a suitable horse that is also a Paint. Just make sure that when you look at a possible sale candidate, you are objective about the horse's suitability to yourself and your riding goals/needs. Remember, you can have it all (paint color, temperament, ability). You just have to be patient. Good luck!
 

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I'll stick my sour oar in again and say, another reason that I am opposed to shopping for a special color is that many of those special colors that attract the eye have health issues that go with them, particular to that color.

Blue eyes, bald faces says skin cancer from repeated sunburn, to me. So does any pink-skinned color.

'Silver dapple' gene? I see the potential for tragic eye problems.

Dapple gray? Skin cancer again.

Speaking of grays, not a health issue, but with any light-colored or mostly-white horse, I think about how to keep it looking clean, which in many situations is well-nigh impossible.

My personality is such that I always want to know the shadow side. Of everything, even horse colors.

Except grulla, the perfect color. I don't have one and probably never will.
 

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It is quite funny how different things are around the world. In my part of the world paint horses aren't particularly desirable and are somewhat looked down upon. A proper horse is black, brown or gray - everything else is "peasant" stock.
I find this mindset amusing and frightening

Amusing because it is only an idea that has been sold and bought based on nothing. A good horse is a good horse regardless of the color or the markings.

Frightening because ideas on just about everything else in life aside from horses is sold and bought in the same matter which creates much pain and suffering in this world.

Most of our software has been downloaded and complete by the time we are six or seven years old making it very difficult to deviate from that paradigm.
 

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I don't think it's a problem. Just means you may have to wait longer, try more horses, or pay more to find "the one" that is also suitable in terms of temperament and training to make it appropriate for your skill level.

My personal experience: For my first horse, I was just like you and imagined my perfect first horse was going to be a tri-colored paint gelding. I ended up with a bay mare. For my second horse, I wanted another bay mare, and ended up with a buckskin. For me, the feelings of comfort/confidence I got from those horses outweighed how I imagined the horse would look. For my second horse, I was also completely set on a specific breed, which is another thing people tell you not to get fixated on. Definitely took me longer to find what I wanted because of the breed restriction, but I have 0 regrets.

I would say though that I'd have a difference answer if you were asking about breeding. I definitely cringe when people start breeding threads asking how to get an X colored foal with a list of colorful stallions with train wreck conformation.
 

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That being said, you should not become colour blind. Don't exclude the perfect horse because he isn't the perfect colour, and don't overlook red flags in a horse that is the perfect colour, but does not have the right temperament.

Our first grey (on the right in the photo above) is an Arabian we bought for my daughter when she was 11. I was looking for a nice, safe QH for her, NOT a hot Arab! But this horse came along and he is everything she could ever want and more. His biggest flaw is that no horse will ever come close to him and my daughter will forever hold the bar high for every other horse in her life.

The Appy (on the left) is another example of a horse I wasn't looking for at the time. I wanted to replace my spooky QH mare (so much for the quiet QH stereotype) with a calm, been-there-done-that horse. A friend of mine had this 6 year old Appy with about 10 rides on him. I rode him a couple of times and fell in love. My friend offered to let me keep him at my place for the winter to make sure we really clicked. Who could say no to that? I bought him in the spring and the rest is history.

So look for your dream horse, but don't be blind because sometimes, the perfect horse comes up unexpectedly. Oh, and as you might surmise from my user name, I'm also a painter who specializes in plein air work! I have been working my Appy up to taking me painting and we're ready to try it now... I just have to find the time to actually do it!
 

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Disregarding looks entirely is more a cautionary tale, I feel, than any hard rule. Just be smart about it. As another comment said it'll be the icing on the cake rather than the deciding factor. But considering your location it's not like there's any shortage of paints/pintos to be had.

My problem is that I'm almost TOO picky. Which may be good in the long run but I'm constantly thinking "oh that's a nice horse!" and then two seconds later going "hmmm but I don't like the angle of his pasterns" (even if they're really perfectly fine) or something like that. I think a lot of different colors are pretty so I'm not picky when it comes to that. Though TBH I'd love to have an all black or almost all black horse again. My first horse was a bit of a troublemaker but I did have a soft spot for him and he was such a pretty, shiny black and would look amazing with just a little grooming. I'm sort of all over the place though, looking at OTTBs, looking at adoptions, looking at ranch horses. I just want one with a good conformation and a level head so it leaves a lot of options open. That doesn't make the search any easier though because I keep finding horses that have a good temperament or decent training but poor conformation and horses with good conformation who have little to no training.

I think the biggest thing to keep in mind is that no matter how excited you are it will take time. Patience is a virtue especially with horse hunting (unless you have good connections I guess). Keep yourself reined in (ha!) and wait for the right horse at the right time.
 
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