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If you want a paint or pinto markings then go for it. You don't seem to think that any pinto will do so keep on looking until you find the whole package.
Agree with @LoriF - get what you want color-wise; just make sure the one you choose meets all your other criteria as well, not JUST color. And, as others have pointed out, be mindful of the health risk of certain traits and do your PPE. There is nothing wrong with wanting a particular color.

I wanted a horse any color other than sorrel. So I ended up with:


A sorrel ...:icon_rolleyes:


When I was looking for another, I said - NO PALOMINOS. So, you guessed it, I ended up with:


A Palomino. :icon_rolleyes:

I have quit looking for color, LOL ...
 

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I find this mindset amusing and frightening

Amusing because it is only an idea that has been sold and bought based on nothing. A good horse is a good horse regardless of the color or the markings.

Frightening because ideas on just about everything else in life aside from horses is sold and bought in the same matter which creates much pain and suffering in this world.

Most of our software has been downloaded and complete by the time we are six or seven years old making it very difficult to deviate from that paradigm.
Well, I am not going to touch that 'software' statement, but there certainly was a reason originally. The cold-climate horses native to Europe have pinto, dun, and cream genes -- but Arabians do not. Pure cold-bloods like ponies, cobs, and drafts, with their thick legs, stocky bodies, and hairy coats, were the working-class horses, while the desert-influenced breeds which were introduced to western Europe in the 18th century, elegant, fine-boned, and speedy, were only owned by the wealthy. And, they were characterized by the solid colors, by and large. Thus limited colors became associated with "class".

From what I can tell, apparently irrational prejudices are rarely hatched from nothing. They may have a faulty basis, they may be outdated, but there is a reason they came to be.

One source of bias for human beings lies in our enormous dependence on one sense -- sight. Appearances mean everything to us. That leads us to bizarre places sometimes.
 

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I find this mindset amusing and frightening

Amusing because it is only an idea that has been sold and bought based on nothing. A good horse is a good horse regardless of the color or the markings.

Frightening because ideas on just about everything else in life aside from horses is sold and bought in the same matter which creates much pain and suffering in this world.

Most of our software has been downloaded and complete by the time we are six or seven years old making it very difficult to deviate from that paradigm.
I find the "peasant" horses to be the most enjoyable! For example, the Friesian may now be considered "koninklijk" (royal), but their beginnings were much more humble. I often feel it's the "farm horse" in them that I love! Smart, sensible and dependable!
 

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Technically no, as long as you remain picky and find the best fit along with color. This may mean a higher price tag, be prepared to wait longer for the right one.
As long as you don’t choose the first palomino paint/pinto you find then I think it is perfectly acceptable.
I am the opposite I wanted a red filly I’ve ended up with a buckskin and now a Red dun haha
 
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I find this mindset amusing and frightening

Amusing because it is only an idea that has been sold and bought based on nothing. A good horse is a good horse regardless of the color or the markings.

Frightening because ideas on just about everything else in life aside from horses is sold and bought in the same matter which creates much pain and suffering in this world.

Most of our software has been downloaded and complete by the time we are six or seven years old making it very difficult to deviate from that paradigm.
In our particular case it is based on reality. For some reason, paint got into our local farm mongrel gene pool a long time ago and most of our farm horses are paint. Small time farmers aren't too big on genetics. They breed their mare regardless of her suitability for breeding to the village stallion so whatever comes out is good enough. As you can guess, most of those horses don't come out perfect. One thing they have going for them is the temperament. Our local farmers aren't too big on spending hundreds of hours on training so spookiness and aggression have been culled out of those breeding lines (if I could call them that).

The "fancy" horses are either TBs, Lippizzaners or Dutch/German Warmbloods - and those rarely come in paint.
 

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In my opinion the reason it is often a bad idea is that it leads people to overlook the problems with a horse, or overlook a much more suitable horse because of the color.

Now would be a good time to read all you can find on horse care, conformation and learn more about horses in general. Nothing wrong with the kind of horse you want to find, but the more you can learn the better chances are that you'll end up with a good one when you find him. Good luck with your search.
 

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There's nothing wrong with having preferences. If a certain color helps you like & bond with a horse, go for it!
It certainly should not be one of the main points, unless a gamble is okay with you. It can even be a deal breaker, if it's not a rare color for the type of horse you're after.

My pinto mini was bought because of her color. Right breed, right price, right location. But mostly, I wanted a colorful mini, that was the whole point of getting another horse. It worked out for me, she's a perfect little girl & a natural cart horse.

My other mini is a silver black, looks brown w/bleached mane/tail, nothing fancy at all. And my two geldings are chestnuts, my least favorite color of all, along with bays. Though, my older gelding can look so cute with his beach hair blowing in the wind. 😍

All 4 have wonderful personalities & are great at what I do with them. Would I prefer more flashy, fun, bright colors? You bet'cha! But I also would never trade them for colorful ones!
 

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It's not wrong at all, but remember you may just find a different colour horse you fall in love with,that happened to me lol
For years I said if I ever get a horse I want a skewbald, I have not managed to find one suitable for me despite searching endlessly....
I found a horse a few weeks ago that I fell in love with....I now have him on permanent loan....he is PIEBALD lol,but I love him to pieces.
Colour can play a big part in choosing a horse but sometimes your heart wins xxx
 

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I don't think there is anything wrong with looking for particular colours, there are some things that simply catch your eye. However, it is funny how "ideals" can change over time. My first 'real horse' was a knabstrup x who was always mistaken for an Appy. I bought him for his colour back in the day when I was just a kid. Nowadays when I think of his colouring I think, poo stains, dull coat because let's face it white never really gleams.


Today give me a BAB (bad *** brown) any day of the week. I love a horse that can shine and dapple, both tend to be characteristics lacking in paint horses unless they are minimal white, predominately dark colours.


The first pic is Toby, who I loved dearly and was definitely an attention getter. Then there is Phoenix, stunning and striking in her own way.
 

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