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Discussion Starter #1
I've noticed being less anchored since covid. A few things merged..moved my therapy office from downtown to a more rural area. I had a great clientele but moving away to a home office saw my practice shrink to about 90%. My work has always grounded me. Now I feel more scattered, forgetful, less present. It's really annoying. My horse grounds me too, but all this covid fear and paranoia are unsettling.
Anyone else feel this way ?
 

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My family is living on 35% of the income we had last year, thanks to my DH being “essential”. But working on commission. When the plants shut down, they do not buy new equipment! It is a little stressful, but I have spent a LOT of time with my horses, and that makes me happy.

I have no fear and paranoia over Covid....but a lot of people do.
 

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I'm doing okay. Some stress with less income. Missing the customary social activities. Which though few, I enjoyed.

I have co-workers who are really down, though. I feel badly for them.

My primary job is in a hospital. I know enough about this virus to know that we don't know enough about this virus. I'm consistently careful with precautions. But I'm human and could make a mistake. With any of the illnesses I'm in contact with.

Maybe I'm used to living with risk.

I wish I could fix everything, or even cheer you up. I just know we'll be okay overall. This isn't the first epidemic the world has gone through.
 

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Hasn't changed my life much at all. Same things going on around the farm that always has. Worst thing is it had slowed my wife's cancer treatment down. We missed about 2 months of getting started on Imuno therapy since it wasn't considered essential. Funny since her life was depending on it, guess it's all where your priorities are. Wearing masks when we go to town or the hospital is the biggest change now. As far covid we don't fear it .We refuse to live in fear, to much more to life.
 

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Most people where I live obviously are over the panic and aren't scared by it anymore. Unfortunately I think at this point you either live in a place where local officials are drunk on power over the people this handed to them or you live in a free place where you can choose for yourself what to do.

We got out of some habits we didn't need like going out to eat a lot, and I started doing some leather working which I always wanted to learn.

For those financially struggling because of it I hope you are finding a way to make it and my thoughts are with you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just wanted to add, I am affected by other peoples fear and paranoia, I don't carry it myself..
My post wasnt written well.. When in the initial months, people energy fields were grayish and I felt oppressed. Being an energy worker I am sensitive to others energies. I try and trust in the process and know we'll all come out of this eventually. Blessings.
 

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I feel kinda bad because I'm actually doing fantastic right now compared to usually. Working from home is much healthier for me; I've lost ~15lbs and my mental health is currently great. Working from home means I have no access to the break room with its horrible-for-you snacks; it cuts out the exhaustion of the commute; plus I'm introverted so even just being in the office with other people around sucks up some of my energy, even if I'm not interacting with anyone; and being at home means I can do things like go do laundry when work is slow, so that I don't have to cram it all in during the weekend. Or I can do things like take a nap in the middle of the day if I don't feel great and then finish work in the evening. Or just not be exposed to the usual office germs. I've never in my life still had sick time by this time of year, but now I get to plan vacation days. It's great!



And I feel guilty about that, because I know a lot of people are struggling, and the economy is in the toilet, and this is, what, over a million people who have died now, worldwide? But I don't feel bad enough about it not to enjoy my reprieve while it lasts.
 

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Most people do not care about covid where I live. Most people go without masks although it is mandated. Country people are mostly outside and it's good to see their smiling faces. Out of 63,000 people in the county there have been 210 infections.
 

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Infections are on the rise in the rural county I live in and the rural county where DH works.

So far, of those I personally know, our appliance repairman for 17 years passed in June; he was in his late 40’s with underlying health issues. My insurance agent’s 17 year old son tested positive last week. He’s on the H.S. Football team so a lot of close contact and we all know invincible teenagers don’t need to wear masks.

Lately I see more masks on people than not, in public places. It is felt the rise in Covid19 in the rural counties stems from get togethers and no mask wearing.

Far as my outlook — I am concerned but I’m not having a panic attack. We live on 25 acres on a one lane farm road so it’s business as usual for me, as Im retired and never have been one who needs to see the bright city lights unless a paycheck was involved:)

DH still works and has a lot of contact with people. He is a neat/clean freak to begin with, so his parts department is sparkling clean with hand sanitizer and counter cleaners everywhere.

We both wear masks wherever we have to go and hope our immune systems don’t fail us now:)

Also, FWIW, the cellulitis flared up in my leg after 2+years of laying dormant. I ended up with a 104.5 fever, so you know the first thing the doctor’s office did was test me for Covid19, lolol. It didn’t matter my leg was beet red, twice it’s size and all I wanted was some potent antibiotics. Test this woman for Covid19 before we come within six feet of her.

Thankfully, three days later, the test came back negative. But in all honesty these Covid19 tests are right up there with Coggins test. Negative today and the stuff can be contracted tomorrow.

At any rate, @boots summed things up best when she said “-we know enough about Covid19 to know we don’t know enough—“, so I continue on, exercising caution when needed but not making myself crazy thinking about all of the “what if’s” :):)
 

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COVID...what has it changed in my/our family life...


Well, I am a "touchy" person who often when speaking with someone would reach out and just touch, then withdraw..no more.
Friends are/were quick to give a hug or kiss to someone is greeting...no more.
In the store food shopping we would frequently meet another known and stop to talk a bit...no more.
I go to work daily adjusting to the current situation. Keep to myself..
My husband is essential so works daily but keeps to himself at work as much as he can.

Our area is still considered "rural" but no where as rural as once was.
People here are friendly but respectful of keeping distant, turning their face away as you pass and only speak to you if you and they are face-covered...at a sizable distance.
We are a small community but even being agricultural based we see the COVID numbers rising.
I don't see fear, I see resignation.
People that were so careful to do all that was recommended still got sick...
How did the 1 week old baby get this virus but all who surround her have been illness free, even the medical staff was not sick...where did it come from?
Someones grandparents haven't left their property or yard since April having food delivered by one single person who is not ill, yet they both contracted this...
It bewilders many, especially the authorities on transmission...
Thankfully, all those I know of recovered, there were others I did not know who died from it.

So, we adapted...
We go no place without face masks, hand-sanitizer.
We go out when the walls of the house close in on us, otherwise we stay home.
Dinner out, not anymore. Take-out and sometimes that just isn't enough either...

We don't entertain nor even speak with out neighbors as we once did...they go out in the community daily, have medium - large size gatherings at their homes and to us the risk is just to great to chance...the unknown of was anyone a silent carrier keeps us apart.
We keep to ourselves as much as we humanly can.


I've learned to open doors with elbows and hip, hold with a toe and growl don't touch it to my family.
I now go to stores, seeking them out during non-busy times to shop for only what I must.
I prefer stores with automatic doors..
I see someone I know and nod a greeting as we pass and smile, although unseen behind my mask.
A passed greeting of when this ends we need to get together is often given.
I've grown accustomed to, but not comfortable with going to the bank and wearing a mask inside!! :shock:
Wearing a mask inside a bank is mandatory, not a option...

I live in a world that is unfamiliar and not liked, tolerated by me to protect me and those around me as we are asked/told to do by experts..
Do I wonder if it makes a difference..sure I do.
Will I do as asked, sure I will.
Do I like it, no.
I do not think we will ever return to what was...a virus never dies completely but goes dormant then reemerges at a later time...that is what I think we deal with.
Now its here, its forever..
Till science comes a very long way in understanding this mutating mess, our world will continue slightly off kilter of "normal" of what we knew.
I don't know of anyone who is not "ungrounded" ...we have all been affected by this.

:runninghorse2:...
 

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I live in Massachusetts, which was one of the hardest hit early on, and is New England liberal (independent yet very community minded) so masks are everywhere. People are suffering and they continue to suffer. We brought the infection rate way way down but now it is slowly rising again, as it is everywhere that it isn't rising fast. As a retired rural introvert, little has changed for me, but that is not true for most. I miss my faith community, and I miss hugging my daughters, who live nearby but in town, so are more exposed than I am. But I am one of the lucky ones.

As has become extremely obvious, complacency is one of the worst enemies we have in this pandemic. It only takes one 'super spreader' to infect hundreds, as has been proven over and over and over. Someone who has no idea they are contagious. We humans are extraordinarily stupid when it comes to risk assessment, and this is a big reason why the pandemic has become one.

The hard thing is to be patient, find coping strategies, and not give in to either fear or weariness. We can do this.
 

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I'm doing okay. I've actually liked the social distancing. I've always been a germaphobe so I haven't changed much in regards to care (I've always used hand sanitizer after being in the shops/out in public). Wearing the mask can be a pain (especially if your nose itches!) but it's such an easy precaution. At my work we have implemented new protocols and at our staff meeting decided we really like these protocols! The office is less chaotic and cleaner. The animals are much less stressed (Veterinary clinic) Everything seems to run smoother as well.

My area is very rural and unfortunately we have seen a spike in cases due to what I think is "caution fatigue". And possibly a belief that it isn't really there because our cases have been so few and less care had been taken to avoid possible spread of the disease.
@livelovelaughride, I am a sensitive too and lately have been very out of sorts--but I know it's not from the fear of Covid (in my area). There's an overwhelming amount of angst out there and that energy at times can be unbearable. Communing with nature is my best bet for achieving balance. But some days can be very hard. I'm thankful for this forum and the wonderful people to chat with!
 

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I have long concluded that I am a fatalist. What is to be is to be.

Covid is here and it is here to stay. We just have to work around it.

Personally I believe it will boil down to herd immunity and a vaccine.

Look at the flu. Way back in 1918 there was a flu outbreak, different from others as it attacked all ages. Prior it had been the young and old that were more susceptible.

This pandemic infected anything from 17 - 50 million plus, possibly as many as 500 million globally. At the time it was not possible to see the virus under the microscopes of the day so Amy were misdiagnosed.

Spread was worsened by homecoming war veterans to their home countries. This lasted for about two years and then gradually faded out.

I think that much the same will happen with Covid sadly. A vaccine will be found but the virus will change as the flu virus does.

I take all the precautions I can. I wear a mask when out shopping. Wash my hands frequently and try to maintain social distancing. I do not worry about it - what is the point? You die if you worry and you die if you don't!

Understandably the fact that work has been greatly reduced and wages either reduced or stopped altogether which is frightening for so many not knowing how they will feed their families prmkeep,a roof over their heads.

We haven't yet suffered a year of this, give it another year and a big drop will be seen.
 

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I have long concluded that I am a fatalist. What is to be is to be.

Covid is here and it is here to stay. We just have to work around it.

Personally I believe it will boil down to herd immunity and a vaccine.

Look at the flu. Way back in 1918 there was a flu outbreak, different from others as it attacked all ages. Prior it had been the young and old that were more susceptible.

This pandemic infected anything from 17 - 50 million plus, possibly as many as 500 million globally. At the time it was not possible to see the virus under the microscopes of the day so Amy were misdiagnosed.

Spread was worsened by homecoming war veterans to their home countries. This lasted for about two years and then gradually faded out.

I think that much the same will happen with Covid sadly. A vaccine will be found but the virus will change as the flu virus does.

I take all the precautions I can. I wear a mask when out shopping. Wash my hands frequently and try to maintain social distancing. I do not worry about it - what is the point? You die if you worry and you die if you don't!

Understandably the fact that work has been greatly reduced and wages either reduced or stopped altogether which is frightening for so many not knowing how they will feed their families prmkeep,a roof over their heads.

We haven't yet suffered a year of this, give it another year and a big drop will be seen.
I agree that there is another year in store at least. In the US there will be intense resistance to vaccination once it is available, which will slow recovery. It's a very weird country.
 

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There was life before Covid, life during and I'm sure that I'll have an entirely different one when the illness becomes one of the many we live with every day.

There's nothing that the virus hasn't touched and I can honestly say that I don't know what's going to happen from one week to the next.

My area was hit quite hard. We had a tough lockdown, which required staying in your home or garden/land for 23 hours a day and 2 metres social distancing when you were outside.

It changed the way I shop, buying in fresh food as usual but also squirreling away canned items, just in case. I was placed on furlough for seven months with some fear that I may not have a job at the end, as I work with people from the UK and abroad. The biggest change to my life was the death of mum, and while she tested negative, I'd argue that a health system focused on the virus contributed to her death.

Over the summer, we managed to bring our numbers down to single figures a day, now we're in a second wave and they're climbing at a frightening rate. We have local restrictions depending on outbreaks such as businesses shutting down and wearing masks in certain locations. Many people aren't complying though, possibly due to restriction fatigue.

I've been recalled to work although I'll be at home, however I can't see that continuing for more than a few months, which has me wondering about the future.

Returning to riding will have to wait.
 

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Most people I know are feeling it. Not necessariliy the fear, or the anxiety, but just the feeling of constant uncertainty, of disrupted schedules, of working from home and/or learning from home. I'm an introvert and I don't mind working from home in the least, but having two teenagers in the house trying to learn from home feels invasive sometimes. Economically, we are fine so that's not a concern. But still... everything feels off.

I'm with @horselovinguy - I think we're in it for the long haul and things may never go back to the way they were. I'm grateful I got to travel and see the world when things were "normal" because it is just too much of a hassle for me now, and does not feel safe. I will also continue to wear a mask and take all reasonable precautions even though in my part of the world, we have very few cases and almost no deaths (two in my province since the beginning of the pandemic), that can change very fast and I don't want the be the source of an outbreak because I couldn't wear a simple piece of cloth over my mouth.

But it takes its toll. I think on some level, we are all grieving the loss of the old normal. My heart aches for my son whose football career is probably over, and for my daughter who is withdrawing more and more from the world (but at least she has the horses which are a saving grace right now). And it aches for a whole generation of kids whose future is so uncertain, they're not even interested in forming relationships, much less families. Having kids seems ludicrous in this new world.

I just wanted to say, @livelovelaughride, that you're not alone. I think on some level, we are all a little unsure and our lives have been disrupted like never before.
 

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The biggest change to my life was the death of mum, and while she tested negative, I'd argue that a health system focused on the virus contributed to her death.
I'm so sorry for your loss @Caledonian. And I think my elderly neighbor who lived alone died because of Covid-19 as well, even if she didn't die OF it. When she had symptoms of a stroke, she didn't want to go to the hospital because she feared she would catch the virus. So she waited a whole day before calling an ambulance. Too much damage had been done by then, and she didn't pull through. One of my biggest regrets is that we couldn't go see her when she was in the hospital (she didn't die immediately, it was dragged out sadly). She was like a grandmother to my children. But visitors were not allowed, and I couldn't even find out where she was to send a card because we are not family. I thought she would come home... I feel horrible now, thinking that she died alone. I should have tried harder to at least locate her and send a word from us.

But yesterday, my heart warmed when I saw the new owners of her house bring a horse trailer! They have two horses who are now grazing on my old neighbor's back lawn, and that would have made her so happy! She loved watching our horses, and even had branches cut off the tree on her front lawn because it obstructed her view of my paddock :)

Sorry... but I think it's another example of how we are mourning so many people, some of whom we can't even see before they leave us. I understand that it's sometimes necessary, but it feels like our humanity is slipping away sometimes. But other times, there is solidarity in the middle of all of it. It's just... different.
 

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And I think my elderly neighbor who lived alone died because of Covid-19 as well, even if she didn't die OF it. When she had symptoms of a stroke, she didn't want to go to the hospital because she feared she would catch the virus. So she waited a whole day before calling an ambulance. Too much damage had been done by then, and she didn't pull through. One of my biggest regrets is that we couldn't go see her when she was in the hospital (she didn't die immediately, it was dragged out sadly). She was like a grandmother to my children. But visitors were not allowed, and I couldn't even find out where she was to send a card because we are not family. I thought she would come home... I feel horrible now, thinking that she died alone. I should have tried harder to at least locate her and send a word from us.

But yesterday, my heart warmed when I saw the new owners of her house bring a horse trailer! They have two horses who are now grazing on my old neighbor's back lawn, and that would have made her so happy! She loved watching our horses, and even had branches cut off the tree on her front lawn because it obstructed her view of my paddock :)

Sorry... but I think it's another example of how we are mourning so many people, some of whom we can't even see before they leave us. I understand that it's sometimes necessary, but it feels like our humanity is slipping away sometimes. But other times, there is solidarity in the middle of all of it. It's just... different.

Thank you. Sadly, too many people have been separated from family and friends because of the virus, I think i was one of the 'lucky' ones and was allowed to stay with her at the end. I can understand how you feel but there is very little you could've done and I'm sure that she understood. While she wasn't surrounded by family, she did have the nurses who would've done everything they could to make it easier for her. The nurses who looked after my mum were amazing, they did so much for us, they hugged me and talked to me like family. So, yes, there is solidarity

That's great news about the neighbours. You may have new riding companions.
 

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I absolutely feel the same way. I was doing so well in the beginning, but have felt more "scattered" and anxious since September. I think the realization that I still can't see most of my family and good friends has hit me now. I really miss them and I worry for some of them, who are in the higher risk category. Plus, the whole world feels more unrestful than ever with the addition of all the political conflict throughout this pandemic. It's a sad time for everyone to adjust to.
 
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