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Discussion Starter #1
Next month I'm getting a New forest colt (intact), and wondered if it would be safe to keep him with my mare (until the vet can geld him)
Here are the facts:
Mare:
7 yrs, never been in season in winter, 14.3hh, has lived with geldings all together and never turned into a hussy (except in the summer months lol!)

New Colt:
6 months old, don't think he has his bits and bobs down yet, still very little (not sure he'd reach if he tried!)

One vet I phoned said wait until he has his little bits, another said it was too frosty to do it, and another said he was probably too young to do anything as of yet and phone after I get him to see how he acts. Thing is if I see how he acts and he turns into a rampant little beggar I might not be able to book the vets in time!

Do you think it would be best to keep them apart from the start until his had the snip?
(please don't be mean because I genuinely want to know BEFORE it's too late, which is why I'm asking now)
 

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I would say it is far better to be safe than sorry so please keep them separate. The mare never showing heat in the winter means nothing. Your new boy is a little young but again, better safe than sorry and it is not unheard of for them to try to be productive at that age.
 

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I say keep them apart just to be safe.

Then when you get him, have the vet come out and check his boys and set up the appointment to have him snipped.

There is no reason for anyone to be mean to you, I personally am glad that you chose to ask because you do not know, very responsible of you.
 

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I definitely say better be safe than sorry, keep them apart if it is at all possible. I am not so much concerned about him breeding your mare as much as I am concerned about your mare kicking your colt. Your colt is still a stud after all, even though he is young he may still try something. The chances of him succeeding at this age are slim, but if he tries your mare might kick him, and kick him hard (especially if he is persistent). If your mare is that horse in your avatar then I can imagine she can deliver a pretty powerful kick, to a six month old that might be life changing.

It's just not fair to put an intact colt with a mare. Horses will be horses, we can not expect either of them to express self control in extreme situation. Wait till his is gelded, and then gradually introduce them to each other (in stalls next to each other, or in neighboring lots). Newly altered geldings will not know right away that they have lost their jewels.

Keep us posted!

Jubilee
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks so much for all your help everyone, I'll deffinitely keep them apart. Do you think it's safe to just partition my paddock to about half each, it's quite a large paddock (not sure about measurements though, sorry) so they can atleast see each other and start getting used to one anothers presence even if they can't get close to each other?
 

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As long as the paddock is still plenty big to allow the horses to run- cutting it in half would be alright. Just make sure that you use safe fencing and keep a very close eye when you first turn out. I dont know your mare but if she is like mine, she could act dominant over the little guy and I would hate for any kicking through the fence or fence charging.
 

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It might be nice to split it in half with an alley inbetween. That way there are no chances of breeding/fighting between the fence. Also, it'll provide a better quarantine if they cannot touch noses.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes, that's a good idea, I'll have a proper look at the field to see if it would be big enough to have an alley way inbetween and let them have plenty of space at the same time :)
 

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I keep my 10 month old with my mare. He's pretty short as of lately. I dont think he can physically reach my mare. When my mare was in heat he was about 5 months. He thinks of her as his mother, but I wouldnt put it past any stallion to try something, given enough time ungelded. He has no studly behavior and hasnt dropped yet. Im patiently waiting to nip him.

My friend kept her two babies together for a year and a half to two years, in the same stall. One a mare and the other not yet gelded. Nothing happened but I wouldnt advise anyone to do that. I was really suprized when she told me about that.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Oh right, I think I'll see how well they get on over the fence before I think about keeping them together... just incase things get a bit ugly!
 

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Size does not matter, if she wants to be bred and he wants to breed her, they can get really crafty. I have seen TINY ponies breed full sized mares (terribly irresponsible neighbors) and very young colts breed mares, I wouldn't risk it no matter how well behaved they are....
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, I don't think I'm even going to risk it with them. A few £'s for the fencing to divide the field will be much cheaper than paying for a foal to be delivered and cheaper than paying for my colt to be treated if he's kicked. So yes, I think I've decided (thanks to everyone's help :D ) that I will keep them apart until he's had the snipety-snip!
 

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i,d keep them apart the colt wo,nt even know he is stallion material yet,but believe me the mare will and when he goes to pal up with her she will lash out at him possibly causing damage
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Honeysuga, but I only made the decision due to everyone's help and experience, so many thanks to everybody! Just can't wait for my little boy to get here now :D
 

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We had a beautiful Arab endurance mare, Soul's Desire, who was the product of a mare (Soul) having just an afternoon in the turn-out pasture with an un-gelded foal. Wise to keep them separate.:wink:
 
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