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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am new- this is my first post, just putting that in there :)

I have a beautiful sweet mare named Rose. I got her a few years ago from my neighbor "for free" or to take care of after I became good friends with her and spent quite some time over there.
My neighbors told me that she is a paint, but I have always wondered-

she isn't the "traditional" paint coloring. To my understanding, paint is a breed of horse, not just a coloring, though, which is likely where the answer to my question lies.
She has a solid black "body"(though red undertones in the sun :) ) and she has a white blaze and white ankle/half sock markings.

Just a side note, too- she is my gorgeous girl and I am not focused on the paint breed/labeling for any reason other than curiosity :)

All of the above in short- do all paint horses have the "patches"?
 

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Not all have patches of color. There are solid "paints."
Now you just broke my world 😄, I always thought there are paints (non-horsey people sometimes call them 'like cows') and there are other solid coloured horses = non-paints. I'm running to google it)
 

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Paint horse people can correct me if I have this wrong: It is my understanding that a "Paint" horse can only be registered if the sire and dam are registered Paints. On the other hand, any spotted horse can be registered in the Pinto Horse Association. Therefore, if the sire and dam are registered Paints, then the offspring can also be registered as Paints, even if they turn out to be solid colors. I do know this is true for the Appaloosa Horse Club, since I've had a bunch of Appaloosas, some of them registered.

What complicates EVERYTHING is that, at least here in Florida, everyone calls spotted horses Paints, whether they are registered or not. They should be called Pintos, but people don't. The Paso Fino people want their spotted horses called Pintos; they are not Paints. But nobody listens to them.
 

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The pinto registration (in the USA at least) is open pretty much any breed that has met the color requirements - from their website, "the eight Pinto horse types include Stock, Hunter, Pleasure, Saddle, Mini A, Mini B, Gypsy/Vanner, and Drum." It's 'just' a color breed registry, not a breed registry.

The paint horse registration (in the USA, APHA) is open only to those with horses whose parents are registered paints, as @knightrider has said. From their website, "first, both a Paint's sire and dam must be registered with the American Paint Horse Association, the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) or the Jockey Club (Thoroughbreds). Then, depending on the amount of white present on the horse, it is placed in either the Regular Registry or the Breeding Stock Registry."

If you were to look at horse ads in the USA, you could find a horse that is double-registered in both the pinto and paint horse registration (or a horse that is triple registered pinto, paint horse, and one of the breed associations such as AQHA).

Confusing, isn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Omg yes, they exist - Solid Paint-Bred | APHA
But how it possible genetically if both parents have "paint" genes??
Well, now that I know my horse indeed is a paint..
I'm sure it is just like people, where inheritance is determined by both dominant and recessive genes given by each parent. For example, brown eyes are a dominant gene, where blue eyes are a recessive gene. A dominant gene can be heterozygous dominant, Bb, or homozygous dominant, BB. A recessive gene is always given as bb.

In a punnet square, which is a demonstration of genetic probability, if two parents with brown eyes have a child, it is still possible to have a child with blue eyes, if both parents are not homozygous dominant.
So lets say we have "paint solid" alleles, where paint is dominant BB or Bb, and solid is recessive, bb.

1115854

And this is just a guess, based on basic genetic inheritance in humans, I'm not sure why horse coloring would be different, but idk.

If both parents were homozygous dominant, (both had dominant paint genes, with no trace of a recessive gene- you can carry a recessive gene without having it, in this example they dont), then there would be, logically, a 100% chance of having a "true" paint, and 0% chance of having a solid paint.

In this punnett square, one parent is a heterozygous dominant gene, meaning that they still carry the "solid paint" dna coding, even though they are a "true" paint.
In this example, there is a 0% chance of producing a solid paint foal, as all copies of the DNA coding are dominated by the "true paint" allele. HOWEVER- there is a 25% chance for the foal to inherit a recessive trait of "solid paint", even though they are still solid paint- so they can pass it down to THEIR offspring.

If they were both heterozygous dominant for the paint gene, there would be a 25% chance to produce a "solid paint", like my mare supposedly is.

Genetics are strange. In order for an offspring (of any kind) to inherit a trait, there have to be two copies of that code- but it is also chance, as well- that is why kids from the same family don't look identical- because the DNA code isn't the same for each child.

I am sure it is frustrating for breeders, too, since genetic inheritance is EVERYTHING- looks, health, conditions, etc- and there isn't a way, as far as I know, to identify whether a person/animal has recessive traits or not.
 

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I have a solid paint gelding. Kirby. He has a blaze, 4 white legs and some freckles on part of one white leg. He has registered parents. He is registered. I always called the solid paints a crop out. It is a term I learned. It was same for solid appys.. I knew a lady with a solid paint stallion that was gorgeous, that would put color on foals. He had no color but even if he bred a solid horse, the foals had color.
 
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