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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have the hardest time telling when a horse is on it's forehand or driving from behind. I can tell in some cases but most of the time it's hard for me...

Anybody want to watch this video and tell me whether my Lacey girl is "driving from behind" or on her forehand? Could you also tell me what tipped you off one way or another?


Disclaimer: This video is from July and my riding has already been critiqued. I'm pretty sure I've currently succeeded in getting my legs under me instead of bracing against the stirrups and sticking my feet out in front like I am here. I've also fixed how far I twisted my feet out, now they are most generally pointing straight forward. I just can't get a new video because I have no one to tape me and my new camera will only take 1 minute of video. >.<

Thanks!

And, her feet were ridiculously long, they're fixed now. =)

 

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Well, to me, she actually does look like she is driving from behind. Also, just thought I'd add this, you need to loosen your reins a little more, give her more slack, that is if you are a western rider. But if you were just messin around than ignore that comment lol :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks paintsrule! I adore her myself. =)

Pecho- Yeah, we were still transitioning from english to western and she hadn't fully comprehended neck reining (and thereby loose reins) yet at anything faster than a walk, haha. Now she's got it all figured out and we can walk, trot and canter all on a completely loose rein. =D

More people? =)
 

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Thats great Wallaby! I hope you have soooo much fun with her! :)
 

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No, she's really not driving from behind. Notice how her hocks are consistently behind her, rather than underneath her. Her back is hollow & you aren't really asking her to use her body properly. She's not balanced front to back, nor is she balanced going either direction. Did you know you were on the wrong lead to the left? At times, she does drive more from behind while you were on the wrong lead (only one or two strides here & there), but that is because it is harder for her to balance that way & she needed to reach farther underneath her body to maintain the gait & balance that she does have.
 

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I'd say she's not extremely balanced and she also goes on wrong lead at times (I have same issue with my horse - still working on it :) ). The good thing though she doesn't look very heavy on forehead (my qh is unfortunately, which is a real pain some time). She looks great for her age and is very cute.
 

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No, she's really not driving from behind. Notice how her hocks are consistently behind her, rather than underneath her. Her back is hollow & you aren't really asking her to use her body properly.

you took the words from my mouth, i think with practice you will get the timing and balence.

one thing i noticed is that when you ask for a upward transition she sort of shoots off and you grab the reins in both hands and slow her down again, next time you go and ride her instead of asking for a trot just close your calfs around her and if she dosnt respond to that "tap tap" with your heels when your doing this your not asking for a trot more of a open active walk then slow her again, then after 4 strides try it again and see if you can almost get a slow trot and when your ready to trot.
once shes in the trot gait just slow everything down and dont go and grab the reins just breath and sit deep

i love your mare shes very nice to watch!
keep it up :D
 

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This horse has very stiff hocks, they barely flex. This prevents her from really sitting behind and carrying any weight, and leads to her hocks being "out" instead of "under".
In order for a horse to "work from behind" aka "collect" aka "sit" aka "develop thrusting power" etc.. they must be able to bend their hocks, place them underneath their center of gravity and carry weight with them.

A great thing to read to help with comprehension (mainly because of the pictures - the text, although very descriptive, requires some filtering of personal opinion. I happen to agree with a lot of it so I like the website, others who disagree may not.) is ::: Sustainable Dressage - Collection & Its Evasions - True Collection - What It Is and How to Achieve It ::: in Section The Signs of Collection - A Source of Misconceptions part 5 Active Hindquarters and Engagement. They are the last two sections on the page.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm horrible with leads, so no, I had no idea! haha I used to be able to tell them apart but I don't canter Lacey very often so I kinda lost that. >.< My instructor is more of a "ride for the fun of it! and don't worry about all the technicalities of leads and such" type of trainer, which is not the type of person I need teaching me, so I stopped taking lessons and have been just kinda riding on my own for the last year. >.< I wish you all could show up and show me what to do! Haha

Are you guys noticing her be off balance mostly at the canter or at the trot too? Her hooves were very long which might have been throwing her off...

PontiMinto- I actually have taught her to "jog" now so she's less of a speed demon. I'll give that a try though, it sounds like it could be helpful. =)

anebel- Are her stiff hocks a fault of her conformation or are they related to her fitness level/something else? I was actually just reading that article the other day! haha Awesome.

Thanks guys! This is helpful.
 
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