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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

So the person that usually goes out to feed the animals at our place is at work earlier than usual for a few days. My boyfriend went out to feed them today and I found out he gave my mare twice as much (maybe more) complete feed than she usually gets, because she's really skinny. And I've been wanting to up her amount of feed because she wasn't getting enough, but not just all at once.
This is my first horse and I know that they're sensitive, but is this something I need to be concerned with? I'm panicking here. It could be a totally stupid question but I've only dealt with one colicky horse before and it was not a fun time.
 

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How much is twice as much? Five pounds vs ten, or one pound vs two? Also exactly what food?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How much is twice as much? Five pounds vs ten, or one pound vs two? Also exactly what food?
I'd say maybe 2 or 3 lb of food is what she got today vs half that. And it's the step 4 complete feed from pro form? Or Trouw Nutrition?
 

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I ask about the feed because some are more digestable than others. The easier it is to digest, probably the lower your risk of colic. For instance, my trainer's horse got into the feed barn and ate, I forget what she said, maybe 20 pounds of feed at once. But the feed was low in grain and higher in beet pulp, and the horse was fine.

I would guess, based on what you are saying, that your horse should be fine. An extra pound of food, I would guess (I'm not an expert) shouldn't be enough to cause colic, unless she has some sort of pre-existing condition, and that would only be a maybe. Of course, it depends on how sensitive she is, and I'd keep an eye on her, but she should probably be OK.
 

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Is it simply a partial forage replacement feed or does it have a complete nutritional profile so it can be a stand alone? I ask because if it is a complete as in stand alone then unless it is a concentrated ration balancer pellet you would be feeding 3 to 5 pounds for it to meet the horses nutritional needs any way. Better smaller meals than larger nut 5 pounds isn't typically an issue. 3 wouldn't be an issue for most.

If it is meant to be a partial forage replacement high in fiber then that shouldn't be an issue at all.

If you are needing her to gain weight though a good senior feed or ideally alfalfa alongside free choice hay and pasture would be what you want. Adding in a ration balancer to top her off and ensure she is getting everything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is it simply a partial forage replacement feed or does it have a complete nutritional profile so it can be a stand alone? I ask because if it is a complete as in stand alone then unless it is a concentrated ration balancer pellet you would be feeding 3 to 5 pounds for it to meet the horses nutritional needs any way. Better smaller meals than larger nut 5 pounds isn't typically an issue. 3 wouldn't be an issue for most.

If it is meant to be a partial forage replacement high in fiber then that shouldn't be an issue at all.

If you are needing her to gain weight though a good senior feed or ideally alfalfa alongside free choice hay and pasture would be what you want. Adding in a ration balancer to top her off and ensure she is getting everything.

Thank you for the information. I'm planning on getting her alfalfa cubes alongside her regular hay. She does get hay daily and a large pasture, so the feed definitely isn't a standalone meal for her. I know she was getting a small amount of alfalfa pellets mixed in her feed but we're all out of that and I don't think it was enough to make much of a difference, if any. I think my boyfriend's mom (the one that feeds them normally) threw it in there because it was the last of what we were giving the sheep.

I'm incredibly relieved to hear that it wasn't a big enough difference, I'm definitely keeping watch on her just to be 100%.
 

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It sounds like she should be ok-- keep an eye on her just in case. Horses who are thin, have an underlying condition, or are overly sensitive can react negatively to even a small diet change. Check her for signs of colic and laminitis over the next few days. Hopefully she'll be just fine.
 
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