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I was chatting with a woman who had bought a horse unseen...said to be broke and calm, etc...then proceed to buck everyone off who tried to ride him.

She turned around and sold him and that lasted 6 weeks til he was offered again as a ...broke and calm horse.

My own experience was with a woman who over exaggerated her horse's soundness and led me to believe all we needed was a bond and he would do anything for me...lol.

A friend's trainer encouraged them to buy a certain horse because that trainer got a finder's fee but the horse wasn't suitable for their riding experience. Somehow that happened twice to them! They were so soft hearted they took the horses on and 'managed' but it couldn't have been fun.

My first experience was the best: my trainer's trainer had a horse who they both said: this is Pat's horse and we had a lovely 8 years together.

Now that I'm looking for another horse and have heard a couple horror stories, it's given me pause to fully believe anyone. I do have people I trust on the lookout for me, but sifting through the various ads and trying to get a sense of that person extolling their horse is fatiguing.

There must be some entertaining stories out there...(hint).
 

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A horse seller who's not truthful? My goodness. Who has ever heard of such a thing.

I do think some of them really believe what they are saying. I think some people are in willful denial about their horse's behavior or soundness. Or sometimes maybe one person sees a behavior one way and one person sees it another (for instance, I call my Pony "friendly" and a "pocket pony" whereas others would say he has no respect for my personal space). But I don't think that's what happened in your friend's case -- sounds like outright lies to me.

I guess some sellers are like "caveat emptor, sucker."

Oh, you wanted stories. Well, I was given Teddy and I'm glad I was, but it wasn't until several months after I had been riding him regularly when the lady who gave him to me casually mentioned, "Oh, yes, he used to rear when asked to canter. I forgot to tell you that?" LOL. He has never reared when I was on him, though.

Also, I found this fun quote on Wikipedia, from the 19th century: ""if the lying were stopped by law, the business of horse trading would come to an end, and the country taverns and groceries in the Winter season would be deprived even of the limited eventfulness which they now enjoy"."
 

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"How old is she?"
"Seven" (they are ALWAYS seven)
"That's a bit too young for me"
"Oh, wait, you meant that bay mare, not the palomino? The bay mare is 14"
...

"Is she pregnant?" (ALL of our mares around here are either pregnant or nursing or both at the same time)
"Yes, of course" (thinking that I will appreciate a two-for-the-price-of-one. I need a foal as much as I need a hole in my head)
"Oh, that is a deal breaker for me, I am not experienced enough for a foal"
"Wait, the bay mare? No, she's not pregnant. I thought you were asking about the palomino mare"

I only ever asked about and saw the bay mare - which was the one he advertised.
I didn't even know he had a palomino mare.


Another guy neglected to mention that he is selling the horse because the horse bucked him off into a bush and then went back to stomp him for good measure. Luckily, riding school kids love to gossip and know EVERYTHING. I always made sure to sit quietly until the kids came to me and blabbed their heads of - I didn't even have to ask.
 

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I have the opposite problem. I frequently run a buyer off by being TOO truthful. Horse bucks? I tell 'em. Horse has a genetic issue (PSSM1 or something) I tell 'em and will show test results. Horse tried to kill me by stomping me in the trailer? Yep, I tell 'em.

The very best dishonest seller story I have is about a horse I now own. I had loved this horse from the minute I set eyes on her, on line not in the flesh. She was for sale, long yearling, super well bred, deaf and trained to show at halter but never been shown. So, I offered what I thought she was worth, owner wouldn't even talk to me. I walked away and just occasionally checked in on her until I was told she had sold.

Sold to a woman with 2 young girls who were ready to step up to their next level horse. Wait, what? A yearling, deaf, and 2 little kids are supposed to be able to handle her? 'Scuse me if I call BOGUS on that! Well, that was in Dec. In Feb. my hubby and I were on our way to OKC and I got a text to see if I was still interested in this horse. Well YEAH! Turns out that A. The kids had no interest in learning how to handle this filly (none of the vocal cues work on her) and B. Because she was raised in a barn and never allowed turn out with other horses, she can be very hard to read. So, took about 30 mins to work a deal with the owner and with in 2 weeks she was in my barn.

I could not believe someone would jeopardize someone else's children by selling this horse as "safe kids horse". They also didn't disclose that she's deaf as a bloody post. So you can scream, cluck, click, snap your fingers, snap a lunge whip, all you want, she's not going to even acknowledge your existence. Walk up beside her or to her face, reach out and touch her and cue her physically and you're good to go. She's sweet, she wants to please, loves to learn and wants to be your friend. I might be a little over protective (mostly of the horse) but I wouldn't sell her to someone who was under 20 and grew up around horses. Someone who had been around enough horses to know that what works for one won't necessarily work for the next.

BTW, she's been lightly started under saddle now, had 6 months at the trainer's working on her halter stuff and right at the last got 30 days lightly under saddle. She's home for winter break and out with other horses, learning to be a horse and most important, learning horse body language so she can "speak horse" to her pasture mates and be a little more easily read by humans.
 

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I had a seller try to pressure me into buy a horse after a very brief ride. I told him no, I always ride a horse more than once before buying. He said that this was my last chance, because he had another buyer lined up. I thought this was strange, since he actually trailered the horse to me! Why would you do that if you already had a buyer? So I said I'd pass.

The next day, he texts me and says he could ask the buyer to hold off for a few days so I could go ride the horse again. I told him no thanks...
 

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I love Ben Green's Horse Tradin'. I re-read it sometimes when I am feeling low. It's just so good.

Most outrageous story I have: A neighbor down the street learned that I had recently lost my horse and offered me a traumatized horse they had in their barn. "All he needs is love," they told me. I needed a horse to love and fill my time, so I took him. He had a hundred nasty quirks and was very hard to work with. One of his worst quirks was to buck high and hard the minute you lifted your right foot to swing over into the saddle. Each time I would figure out how to outsmart him with his numerous problems, he'd escalate to something more dangerous. He couldn't be haltered, but he could be easily bridled. You could not lead him forward, but you could back him wherever you wanted to go. Someone had wrapped barbed wire around a bit at one time, and his mouth and tongue were so badly scarred and lacerated that you could only ride him in a hackamore.

Finally, one day, as I leaped on him while he bucked (he was lovely to ride once you got over the mounting mess), he got his foot tangled in my electric wire, got shocked as he bucked, and I came off. I decided he needed a lot more than love, and gave him back to my neighbors.

A week later they sold him to a nine year old girl. I was furious and never rode with them again.

Another funny horse selling story is a time I went out to try a horse that looked promising. As I tacked her up, I noticed she had a bad cough. When I tried to ride her, she could barely go for the coughing. When I told the seller that I didn't like her bad cough, he got really rude with me, telling me I couldn't appreciate a good horse, and all she had was a little cold. He practically ordered me off the property!
 

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A little off topic, some may enjoy this though. A couple years ago wife and I went to a riding place in N.C. Smokey Mountains. As guides were getting horses ready I walked over, wife back in cabin talking to the lady owner. I told them wife was an expert rider, broke horses, riding 60 years, etc. I was a novice, needed a really gentle horse.
They put me on Bess...this sweetheart older mare. My wife they put on "Ratchet"...name says it all . Actually sweetie did really well on him...after I told her what I did she was upset, not too bad.
Halfway through this gorgeous ride through mountain trails I told a guide "we don't smoke...but for whatever reason I'm craving a cigar...so he gave wife and I each one.
It was fantastic!...except for the people riding behind us!
About buying a horse, to me it's not an impulse buy. I'd have to know all about it, watch owner ride then me ride, have it checked (vet), etc.
Much better if you know the history, know the owner, etc.

Sent from my SM-S205DL using Tapatalk
 

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Further to @DreamCatcherArabian ‘s thoughts and to play Devils Advocate —-

Let’s, not forget the other side of the coin, where the Seller does tell the truth and the Buyer envisions themselves a much better rider than they are, or maybe ever will be.

Pretty soon the horse catches on, starts taking over, and starts misbehaving to get out of work because it knows it can.

I’ve read about this, ad nauseum on more than one forum thru the years. The poor horse ends up kicked to the curb and likely at a slaughter auction because it fell into the hands of a Buyer who couldn’t be truthful to their own self, regarding their abilities —- they watched way too many westerns, pretending they were on that galloping horse and started to believe it:):)
 

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Here's a site with lot's of good info. https://www.horsetradertricks.com/ It hasn't been updated for a while but was current when we were horse shopping. Another site which is a lot of fun and a bit truthful: https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/equine-translation-guide.html


Generally I've had a good experience buying horses except for the 3 hour trip in heavy traffic around the DC beltway with a trailer in tow. Owner knew we were coming but was late getting back from a strenuous trail ride. Horse was lame and owner was quick to give bute and tell us horse would be ok. We passed. Another time seller told us horse was not what we were looking for but agreed to show us as we were in the area. Horse was super broke, sensitive with lots of buttons, and not what beginners needed. On two occasions my daughter has purchased barrel horses from quite a distance. Each time horse was exactly as described. We traveled to see each horse, had ppe, and brought them home.



When it comes to selling, I'm a lousy salesman. I've sold two horses which had been with us for a while and I wanted to find a good home where they had the greatest chance for success. First was a blind in one eye flashy leopard Appaloosa with a bucking habit. Buyer had ppe and there was some concern about possibly losing sight in the other eye. We gave her the horse but told her we'd take him back if it didn't work out. He came back to us after he learned to rear which was something he had not done with us. We sold him again with full disclosure to a 20 something girl who wanted a cheap horse with loud coloring. Second horse was my wife's wonderful coal black bomb proof walker mare who had it in for my daughter's barrel mare. That and my wife didn't rider her. Another issue was that she had developed mild heaves. I answered numerous inquiries and turned down many low ball offers but finally found her a wonderful home with an anxious but determined rider who rode her in a night time parade just weeks after getting her.



I'd much rather buy than sell any day. When buying; look at horse, do research, have ppe, and pass if not what you want with no emotional attachment. When selling, even though they didn't meet our needs, I was still attached to the horses and wanted the best for them.
 

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Further to @DreamCatcherArabian ‘s thoughts and to play Devils Advocate —-

Let’s, not forget the other side of the coin, where the Seller does tell the truth and the Buyer envisions themselves a much better rider than they are, or maybe ever will be.

Pretty soon the horse catches on, starts taking over, and starts misbehaving to get out of work because it knows it can.

I’ve read about this, ad nauseum on more than one forum thru the years. The poor horse ends up kicked to the curb and likely at a slaughter auction because it fell into the hands of a Buyer who couldn’t be truthful to their own self, regarding their abilities —- they watched way too many westerns, pretending they were on that galloping horse and started to believe it:):)
I think this happens as much or more than you have lying sellers, but of course, if you over horsed yourself you want someone to blame it on, so why not the seller?
 

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I strongly prefer getting a horse from a friend or friend-of-a-friend than a random stranger. Then you have some idea of what the horse is really like. I HAVE bought horses from random strangers, even my first horse, but that's really risky especially when you are a beginner. And 20 years later I still would rather not by from a stranger.

I bought a pair of horses one time that couldn't be ridden apart. I did test ride them........but not without the seller riding the other horse with me. Well, I got them home and couldn't ride them individually. What a nightmare.

I will say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder though. And sometimes what is a problem to one person is not a problem at all to another. I've bought horses that were a little jiggy or hyper with their past riders that were just wonderful for me........I even enjoyed the behavior. I rode a horse over to the old owners one time in a halter (just a casual, short ride to say hi or something) and they were all really impressed. And I was like "horse has never given me a lick of trouble!"

And a horse that I raised from a foal that was just a spooky mess for ME is a perfect horse for my neighbor. He adores the horse and it's his favorite horse. So sometimes I think it's about finding the right person for the horse. A horse can be a problem horse for one rider and the perfect horse for another depending on their skills and comfort level. Tack issues can be another problem that will cause a good horse to act up.

But yes, I'm sure all kinds of lying goes on, which is why I try not to buy from complete strangers. If you buy through a friend-of-a-friend, you are more likely to get the straight scoop on the good and bad traits of the horse. All horses have "something." It's finding the "something" that is no big deal to you.
 

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I just bought what is essentially my first horse I’ve paid for.
He was at auction, the only reason I was willing to try it is he is 30 days money back for pretty much any reason.
We had one poor ride while trying to work out tack and he’s otherwise been as advertised.
Vet check went fine but I was fairly confident on soundness already.

I will say it’s much more intimidating to buy than to pick up a free horse from a friend or client even though they tend to cost more in the long run.


In fairness the my first horse was for sale because she didn’t stop and people were jumping off of her. I’d only been in a saddle a couple times.
I learned to stay on or hang on to the reins until she stopped.
I had her 16 great years.

The same guy sold another mare as a first horse to a city family and I found the mother standing on a tack box, holding the rafters, shrieking as that poor horse ran up and down the aisle. They returned her shortly after that.

Not the most scrupulous salesman in either case but two very different outcomes.
 

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Great horses aren't for sale, and really good horses are really expensive. I think that is lesson one lol.

The greatest and best of all my horses ( I am on number 14), was for sale. I bought her for $400 with my babysitting money. She was tall and powerfully made. Not only that, a few months later, surprise, she produced a foal. He was nothing like his dam though. Later, when I pasture bred her to a Saddlebred and she did not settle and later I bred her to a grandson of Native Dancer- no results. But she lived for 40 years and we must have ridden thousands of miles, what a deal.
 

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See this is why I don't talk to the seller when I'm buying. I know what I want and the horse never lies, so his word is the one I'll be trusting. Seller might tell me the horse has never bolted a day in his life but if I see 'the look' in that horse's eye I'm not even swinging a leg over. I ask for pictures, video if the horse is far away, and then I show up and put the horse through his paces. THEN I will talk to the seller. I prefer horses that aren't yet broke - fewer lies to wade through and far less hassle. Plus then I can train them up the way I like 'em.

And when buying, never forget the golden rule: Pics or it didn't happen!! Never accept anyone's word on anything unless they've got pictures and videos to back it up. Horse can be shot off of? I gotta see it. Broke to drive? Great, show me the video. Never been lame? No problemo, evidence please? When I sold Thunder I left out a few things that he could do because I didn't have any evidence to back it up. All of the claims I made (and they were 4 paragraphs' worth lol) had pictures or video evidence to prove it. In my opinion it's the only way to sell a horse, especially now with so many people buying out of state, sight unseen, etc. Thunder's buyer specifically said she felt she had no reason to come test ride him since I sent her such thorough evidence of anything she asked for and bought him sight unseen, half a continent away. She still sends me pictures and videos all the time and the two of them are having a great time together, which I love seeing. This fairytale ending brought to you by the letter E for EVIDENCE. ; )

-- Kai
 

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As someone who did a lot of dealing, i found my reputation was built, not on the good horses I sold but the bad ones.

Sell a good horse, friends of the buyer ask where they found it. More often than not they are reluctant to say where because (?) they are worried friend might find a better horse than theirs.

Sell a bad horse and all to fast the word goes round of where it came from.

A good dealer will take an unsuitable horse back and exchange for another (within a couple of weeks)

I was shipping horses from Ireland, I knew nothing about them and was always honest about that. My ideal was for me to sell the horse asap. If it stepped off the horsebox and into stable, it was adding to its cost, so, I was selling mainly to other dealers. I would add £25 - £50 to the cost of that animal, which included shipping. 14 horses on a load and most would go in one day. Not a bad profit back in the 1970s.

Oh so often I have seen horses/ponies that were no problem sold and then, in a matter of weeks, they are nothing like they were when sold. Purely the fault of the buyer not knowing what they were doing.

I once sold a good, easy going, 14.2 pony to a family for the oldest daughter. The mother of the girl was experienced. Pony was sold with a warranty meaning it was good in traffic, easy to load, clip, shoe et al. I get a call from the mother saying she couldn't get near him with the clippers. When I went over the pony was being bargy and was clearly taking advantage of the new owners.
I walked in and set my clippers up. As I approached him so he swung his butt to me threatening to kick. I picked up my twitch and as he swung back so I whacked him hard on his butt.
I then proceeded to fully clip him with no objection at all.

Just a case of the animal taking advantage.
 
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