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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I do not like the work being done my the farrier at the barn where I board my horse. I have no idea why the barn owner insists on using him, but I think he used to take lessons there or something, so they have a friendly relationship. The only horse whose feet look even half decent are my horse’s, thankfully, but the instant he does her dirty, I am going to insist on bringing in someone else even if she’s the only client.

These are the front feet of a five year old horse there. He has no soundness issues… yet. But these are how they look just three weeks post-trim. The soles don’t even look like they belong to the same horse. The bars on the one are so overgrown that I can stick my fingers half an inch under them. They’re both getting very underrun. The flares have not been addressed. He’s flaking and chipping and cracking from long toes. The farrier does nothing to roll the walls to prevent this.


I had been riding this horse occasionally but I feel bad making him work at all while he’s in this state. I’ve tried to politely address this with his owner but she’s also friendly with the farrier and very set in her ways so pushing the issue isn’t going to result in anything but her getting defensive and shutting down.

I couldn’t get a full set of proper pics, but I think these give a pretty good idea of the state of them. The backs are too long too but not nearly as bad as these.

Are they as terrible as I think they are? I can’t see why he isn’t touching any of these extremely obvious problems. Makes me wish I had the tools to go at these myself. 😢

First pic is one front foot, second and third pic are the other. Fourth pic shows a top view of one.

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Ouch...
Till the issues are addressed by the owner to the farrier I would no longer ride this animal for fear of him injuring himself or you with feet so poorly maintained.
I can't say neglected cause the animal is seen by "a farrier" I also not want to give that title to the individual earned.
You don't want a finger pointed at you, and I realize you may lose $ if paid to ride, but at the cost of the animals soundness or you getting injured from a fall...yea, no.
Pet the nose, groom the horse but no more "activities" would I do till the hoof issue is addressed by someone far better informed of what they should be doing for the animals benefit.
jmo...
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Uh. I read your post before scrolling down and I wasn't expecting THAT. Am definitely with you Steady. There is a mare that I look after that hasn't hers done in half a year that look just slightly worse O.O I dont know enough to point individual things out but I would not be chuffed to pay for a regular farrier and get those results. Does the BO actually LOOK at the feet? But even then I volunteered at one place where bad feet where "normal", same as how fat horses become the norm.
 

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That is a lot of growth for 3 weeks. But now is the growthy time of year. Might not be the farriers fault. My horses are trimmed every 3 to 4 weeks right now. However, I am pretty sure he left too much bar.
 

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This was someone elses horse? It looks like a barefoot trim job to me. Barefoot trim is a lot different that shoe trim, they want to have the horse support their weight on their natural structures, not the hoof wall. The hooves look to have been neglected and had chipped up feet. He or she or he he trimmed as best they could three weeks ago.
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This was someone elses horse? It looks like a barefoot trim job to me. Barefoot trim is a lot different that shoe trim, they want to have the horse support their weight on their natural structures, not the hoof wall. The hooves look to have been neglected and had chipped up feet. He or she or he he trimmed as best they could three weeks ago.
I've seen some pretty amazing barefoot trims. The only thing about these feet that looks like a barefoot trim, to me, is the fact that they're bare, they're feet, and presumably he "trimmed" them.

This horse is on a six week cycle, same farrier this whole time, so no excuse for them to look neglected from previous work!
 

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Like you said, over grown bars and due for a trim, even if it was 3wks ago. Doesn't look like he touches the bars at all? No way they grew that much in 3wks. Walls? Definitely possible, but I've never seen bars grow that far in so little time. Probably decent feet under there, but can't tell what the heels are doing.
 

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Yep Steady, pretty crap job, and even if the horse had only been done once or twice by the guy, had been neglected previously, no good excuse to leave bars so phenomenally overgrown, toe stretched, flared walls.

This was someone elses horse? It looks like a barefoot trim job to me. Barefoot trim is a lot different that shoe trim, they want to have the horse support their weight on their natural structures, not the hoof wall. The hooves look to have been neglected and had chipped up feet. He or she or he he trimmed as best they could three weeks ago.
I disagree with this on many levels. As above, even if the horse had been seriously neglected until very recently, the farrier could have done better, at very least with the bars & flared toes. And a GOOD 'barefoot' trim shouldn't be very different at all from a GOOD trim for shoes. Yes, unfortunately there are still many farriers who think hooves should be peripherally loaded - they should carry their entire load on their toenails, that the underside of the foot is not built to support the horse, and yes, there are many would leave a hoof wall flared like that, so they have wall to attach a shoe to. As such, this looks to me more like a bad job from a conventional(& not very knowledgeable) 'shoer' rather than a (bad) job from 'barefoot trimmer'.
 

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I don't know how this horse isn't lame. My paso was dead lame after a poor trim once that left bars half that size. My sister was just learning to trim so she had the tools to take down his bars and he was instantly cured--no more lameness. When the farrier came out again he could tell it wasn't his "work" and said he didn't want to trim my horse if we were going to mess with it so I told him not to come back. And it was awkward because he was my bf's neighbor and he tried to school me on how a hoof trim makes the horse sore sometimes--whatever. It's worth it to learn how to trim a horse properly yourself even if you don't want to actually do the trim--at least you'll know what looks good and what doesn't and maybe can touch it up on your own.
 

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Agree with those who say the trim is awful. If anything like a small stone gets trapped under those bars, the horse will most likely get a serious abscess. I've seen that happen a number of times. The sole also can't shed out properly with the bars effectively trapping it underneath.
 

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And a GOOD 'barefoot' trim shouldn't be very different at all from a GOOD trim for shoes.
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Good one loosie!!
A "good" farrier or barefoot trimmers work benefits the animal...
Those feet were and are terrible...
Can you imagine how much better the animal will feel, will travel when ridden or in t/o with feet that had good care given...:eek:
They say horses are stoic...this proves that comment. Poor animal.
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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Agree with those who say the trim is awful. If anything like a small stone gets trapped under those bars, the horse will most likely get a serious abscess. I've seen that happen a number of times. The sole also can't shed out properly with the bars effectively trapping it underneath.
Actually, "funny" thing... this farrier will blame literally any problem on "an old abscess." Toe splitting half way up because he doesn't bring the toes back enough? "Oh he must have had an old abscess there." False sole chunking off because he doesn't bother managing that? "Oh he must have had an abscess there at one point. You didn't notice him being lame?"

He also suggested treating thrush with undiluted bleach. :oops:

ETA: For comparison… my thrush treatment protocol is Red Horse’s Sole Cleanse and Artimud in the winter, when things are bad, and just painting the central sulcus with Fiske’s during the dry months. Gentle but effective products that don’t kill live frog tissue. Bleach!!! Ugh.
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks everyone for the input! I'm seriously tempted to bring in someone else for my horse. Believe it or not he actually has been doing a decent job with her... so far... incredibly. But how long until that changes? I certainly don't want hers to start looking anything like this guy's feet! And maybe it would wake up some of the other people at the barn to the fact that they aren't necessarily locked in to using this guy. He's coming next week, and I'll have him just go ahead and do her again this time as it's pretty short notice to change anything. And he seems better at shoeing than anything else, and my horse does wear shoes in the summer. But I'll post pics of hers right after, and see what people here think. If there are any warning signs to watch for with what he's doing to her in particular. Fortunately Elle's feet grow in strong and tight and don't seem to need much done to them -- which is probably what's been saving her this whole time.
 

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It wouldn't hurt to start looking around now, even though you're planning on having this guy do the feet next time he's out. In my experience, finding a good farrier can be pretty time consuming. Seems like half of them never respond, or you have to really chase them down to get a resopnse, and a bunch of the others are only booking out a month in advance.
 

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I feel so bad for you. I understand because I'm in a similar situation. I do not want to be one of "those clients" that are never happy. I HAD a farrier I loved, till he retired. Then got his son who either is on drugs or a drunk because he would forget to do the back two feet on a horse and most of the time, completely leave my Peruvian Paso untrimmed, then bill me for it. Found somebody else and he would only trim 2 of the 8 horses, then say he was coming back, but not show for 2 weeks, then only do another 2 horses. My horses always looked so bad, I was embarrassed. Got another farrier, suggested by horse vet. He was reliable and came every 5 weeks, but every horse had some major fault in the trim, and he left every horse wrong with a different problem. Finally, I called a friend who knows a good farrier and I pulled the shoes on all them. Some were already barefoot, but none need it unless we ride on state parks. This farrier is a woman, so I thought she'd be more detail oriented.Well, she comes every 6 weeks but the toes that were too long are still not shortened up. I knew to wait a year, but next month is 12 months and the feet still look bad. I'm starting to think it's all in my head, but I'm tired of watching my TWH tripping, and my Paso gelding walking like he's in pain. Then the lady who gives them a Spring clipping comes and remarks how Paso gelding is "way overdue for a trim", except it was 5 DAYS since he was trimmed! His toes look like they are curling upward at the tips! I swear, I'm ready to go to a farrier school myself to get this job done correctly. I can't even imagine trying to find another farrier.........
 

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I swear, I'm ready to go to a farrier school myself to get this job done correctly. I can't even imagine trying to find another farrier.........
You would not be the first person on Horse Forum to do this!
 

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I'm seriously tempted to bring in someone else for my horse. Believe it or not he actually has been doing a decent job with her... so far... incredibly. But how long until that changes?
As long as you are involved, standing there and watching do you really think he is going to just "rub" those feet and collect his money...not likely.
Make sure you are there and watching him at his work...
Actually, would be a perfect time to ask why is the other horse have such overgrown & crushed bars noticed when you ride and need to groom first..but your horse is not at all similar.
Would love to hear that answer....please do tell when you get it.
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I knew to wait a year, but next month is 12 months and the feet still look bad. I'm starting to think it's all in my head, but I'm tired of watching my TWH tripping, and my Paso gelding walking like he's in pain.
I gather you at least haven't been riding/working your Paso since he's been in obvious pain & have been looking for answers to his lameness? I'm puzzled if you've noticed these issues, realise toes are so long, why it sounds you havent looked to the trim for the lameness/tripping before? I'm puzzled also by your 'wait a year' comment? It makes it sound like you've been using this person for a whole year, knowing she's doing a terrible job.
 
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