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My opinion is to not let yourself get attached to this horse. Should you give the horse a chance, perhaps yes. But prepare yourself for the possibility that this horse won't recover and you may need to consider euthanasia sooner or later.

If someone gives me a free horse with severe health issues, I would probably euthanize before getting attached. I'm one of those people who have a hard time not throwing away money and wanting to do more. My old horse has a chronic degenerative disease and I think I've probably spent $2000 a year on her. That's $20,000 for the last 10 years.... Probably more then that. I have purposefully avoided adding up what I spent. Probably enough to buy a nice car. Unfortunately her condition is in decline and she will be going over the rainbow bridge soon enough. But if someone gave me a horse with her same condition, I would not continue.

I see all these young horses that get thrown away... Mustangs left in holding pens. And I wonder if we do the right thing by investing in a crippled animal, when there are so many healthy ones waiting for rescue. Just a thought.

Best of luck to you. Do watch for abscesses... As if the horse had frequent abscesses, I would also consider euthanasia. Nothing is more painful than an abscess.

Based on that x ray, I would probably euthanize... But I have not seen the horse. How lame is the horse? Can the horse stand comfortably for the farrier? How well does the horse move in the pasture?
 

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Do watch for abscesses... As if the horse had frequent abscesses, I would also consider euthanasia. Nothing is more painful than an abscess.
Yes. While the odd abscess can be dealt with, and when feet are this bad, I'd actually expect at least a couple, but IME THAT is perhaps the biggest prob with a hoof that's so damaged - the corium will be badly damaged & frequent, ongoing abscesses may cause severe suffering, even if everything else can be managed.
 

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Sorry to all the barefoot gurus but your barefoot trimmer needs to go. At least for now, this is not a time to declare barefoot is the only way.
Now just reading replies... To the above, IF your 'barefoot trimmer' believes keeping the horse barefoot is the only way, that there is no place for any other management options, THEN I would be inclined to agree. But there are many 'barefoot trimmers'(I consider myself under that 'umbrella') and farriers for that matter, who know that while barefoot may well be best, generally speaking & for most horses, most of the time, that's not to say it is for all, or that shoes are necessarily 'evil'. I'd imagine that a 'barefoot trimmer' who has studied with Pete Ramey is very likely of the latter persuasion & has a good idea of what would be best/needed for this horse. And unfortunately, possibly their 'pessimistic' outlook is because they know the horse(not just the few words & rads we have here) & have more objective knowledge.
I want to offer an alternative opinion on 'barefoot trimmers' - a 'barefoot trimmer' may truly be the way to go (depending on the trimmer, of course). If I have learned one thing since using a 'barefoot trimmer' for the past year, many are very up-to-date on new and upcoming hoof care technologies (definitely moreso than the traditional farriers I've had in the past!).

My understanding of 'barefoot trimming' is that the average horse should be able to go barefoot BUT therapeutic shoeing (and other treatments) definitely have their time and place. One super cool technology my 'barefoot trimmer' and I talked about last time was Formahoof, which could aid rehabilitating a laminitic horse (they offer online consultations about their product, too).

OP, if you are serious about trying to rehab this horse, IMO, the most important thing is to be working with a farrier that not only knows his stuff, but is also is open-minded enough to seek out other options.
 

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Recognizing Coffin Bone Rotation

Horseback Magazine—Pete Ramey #2 4-10-2013




Q: Hello Pete, I wonder if you can help with a problem we have? My horse had laminitis in the past and we have him on a low-sugar diet, but we are still having issues with the hooves. He seems to have such a long toe, but we just can’t trim it any shorter (we trim the sole as much as we dare and back up the toe to the white line). His heels seem too high, but if we trimmed them the toe would seem even longer. I have sent a picture (figure 1) of one of his front hooves, any help would be appreciated.

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A: This is a very common (but serious) problem. You should get lateral radiographs to confirm this, but I think you should instead be trimming the heel and leaving the sole alone at the toe. Look at your horse’s hoof from the side with your chin at ground-level. Do you see that the upper wall growth close to the coronet (hairline) is steeper than the wall growth at ground level? The wall growth at the hairline is probably better-connected and more parallel to the coffin bone—with the lower wall growth separated or rotated away from the bone (see figure 2). Most of the time, when people feel the need to “stand a horse up” they have encountered a problem like this.

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When hoof capsules are flared or rotated away from the bone, the tip (front or apex) of the frog will appear to be too far away from the toe because the frog grows from the under-side of the bone. The white line may appear normal, even with significant rotation present. This is because the material produced between the coffin bone and the hoof wall (lamellar wedge) can look much like the sole. Drawing by Karen Sullivan from the book Care and Rehabilitation of the Equine Foot, P. Ramey, Hoof Rehab Publishing, 2011.



The dashed line in figure 3 represents a normal hoof as it should surround the coffin bone. By studying this drawing, you should be able to see why I suggested that you might be going about this backwards (by trimming sole at the toe and leaving the heels alone). In the drawing, the heels are higher than they should be, while the sole at the toe is dangerously thin. Since there is too much material in the back of the foot, and not enough in the front, this also means there is one area in-between that is just right. Be careful not to trim the area that is already correct. This means that as you lower the heels, there will be a rockered appearance to the back of the foot.

Caution: If the sole is as thin as these drawings suggest, special care must be taken not to bruise the sensitive tissues. Don’t let the horse walk barefoot on hard terrain. For horses in this condition, I tend to use hoof boots with foam-rubber insoles, but many devices will work—from elaborate shoeing packages to simple taped-on padding.

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A typical rotated hoof capsule. The dashed line represents the location of a normal hoof capsule surrounding the bone. If this idealized foot were cultivated, the frog would be much closer to the toe, the sole at the toe would be thicker, the heels would be low, yet the toe angle would be steeper and more compact. Caution: This does not mean that the foot should be trimmed to mimic the dashed line. Instead, this should be thought of as an eventual goal—acquired gradually with new growth. Drawing by Karen Sullivan from the book Care and Rehabilitation of the Equine Foot, P. Ramey, Hoof Rehab Publishing, 2011.



Lowering the heels must be done with care and consideration. Flexor muscles (and their tendons) may be in excess tension and ligaments may have adapted to the upright conformation. Take measurements and try to gain 1/4 inch per month while monitoring the horse’s stride and comfort. Slow down the heel-lowering if the horse is standing very upright and impacting toe-first at the walk. Speed up heel-lowering if the horse is rocking back on its heels (founder stance). This is a delicate matter that cannot be learned from a magazine article—be sure you have very competent professionals (vet and farrier) on the job.

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This drawing represents what the same foot could look like in several months as the rotation is growing out. New growth at the toe has made it halfway to the ground—the lamellar wedge is almost gone. The sole has thickened at the toe, and the heels are at a more normal height. Drawing by Karen Sullivan from the book Care and Rehabilitation of the Equine Foot, P. Ramey, Hoof Rehab Publishing, 2011.



Looking at the picture of your horse’s hoof, I see another very likely factor. When the overall hoof capsule seems too long, yet the sole is also thin, you can bet that the coffin bone has sunk to a lower-than-normal position within the hoof capsule (or more accurately, the coronet has migrated too far upward). If this is the case, above all else, be sure that you leave enough sole to protect the internal structures from impact. This condition can often be reversed, but not if someone is removing excess sole trying to make the hoof capsule appear to be a normal length.

You mentioned that you have already cut sugars from the horse’s diet, but I must stress that this is a key factor. This probably began as a nutritional problem, so can probably not be fixed with hoof care alone. If the diet and hoof care have been adequately improved, in 3 or 4 months the hoof will look strange (see figure 4). The new wall growth below the hairline will appear steeper and more compact than the old growth near ground level, as if the new growth doesn’t match the rest of the foot. This can be alarming unless you understand what is truly happening. It will look much better when the new growth reaches ground-level.

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Eventually—if the diet and hoof care are correct—the steeper new wall growth will reach the ground, allowing the sole at the toe to reach full thickness. At that point, even though the heels are much lower than they were, the toe wall will be steeper. Overall, the foot will be more compact, more comfortable and more useful for the horse. Drawing by Karen Sullivan from the book Care and Rehabilitation of the Equine Foot, P. Ramey, Hoof Rehab Publishing, 2011.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I want to offer an alternative opinion on 'barefoot trimmers' - a 'barefoot trimmer' may truly be the way to go (depending on the trimmer, of course). If I have learned one thing since using a 'barefoot trimmer' for the past year, many are very up-to-date on new and upcoming hoof care technologies (definitely moreso than the traditional farriers I've had in the past!).

My understanding of 'barefoot trimming' is that the average horse should be able to go barefoot BUT therapeutic shoeing (and other treatments) definitely have their time and place. One super cool technology my 'barefoot trimmer' and I talked about last time was Formahoof, which could aid rehabilitating a laminitic horse (they offer online consultations about their product, too).

OP, if you are serious about trying to rehab this horse, IMO, the most important thing is to be working with a farrier that not only knows his stuff, but is also is open-minded enough to seek out other options.
I agree with you. I am feeling a lot of resistance from BF trimmer. She is saying that there is no wall integrity for nails. I asked about FormaHoof and have looked it up, but there is a not a practitioner anywhere near me (southern California).
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
My opinion is to not let yourself get attached to this horse. Should you give the horse a chance, perhaps yes. But prepare yourself for the possibility that this horse won't recover and you may need to consider euthanasia sooner or later.

If someone gives me a free horse with severe health issues, I would probably euthanize before getting attached. I'm one of those people who have a hard time not throwing away money and wanting to do more. My old horse has a chronic degenerative disease and I think I've probably spent $2000 a year on her. That's $20,000 for the last 10 years.... Probably more then that. I have purposefully avoided adding up what I spent. Probably enough to buy a nice car. Unfortunately her condition is in decline and she will be going over the rainbow bridge soon enough. But if someone gave me a horse with her same condition, I would not continue.

I see all these young horses that get thrown away... Mustangs left in holding pens. And I wonder if we do the right thing by investing in a crippled animal, when there are so many healthy ones waiting for rescue. Just a thought.

Best of luck to you. Do watch for abscesses... As if the horse had frequent abscesses, I would also consider euthanasia. Nothing is more painful than an abscess.

Based on that x ray, I would probably euthanize... But I have not seen the horse. How lame is the horse? Can the horse stand comfortably for the farrier? How well does the horse move in the pasture?
Yes, I knew there was going to be a heavy cost to try to help her. I am already quite attached. She is truly one of a kind. Even with all of this pain, she is so patient for trimming, and comes right to me (or the new BF trimmer) as soon as she knows what needs to be done. It's like she's asking "are you going to fix it this time?" But she has become withdrawn, I can tell she is masking more pain than she is showing. It really is a sad situation.

I appreciate your feedback and just want you to know I am willing to make the call and have accepted it. Of course, I will make the right choice to euthanize if she just can't get comfortable. Paddock sound would be great. But my hopes are becoming much lower as the days go on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hi,

It really does matter, IMHO, how the particular horse is feeling, how they're coping with it all, not just how much or little 'clinical' damage there is. I've known of horses who were penetrating on all 4 feet - leaving bloody footprints! - and horses with severe P3 loss, to come good, while horses who's rads look nothing more than that first xray, to be hobbling & sad no matter what. So, that's not in the least to say doesn't matter the level of clinical damage, just that to a degree, that's not a 'be all'.

So, if you can tell us how the horse is doing, in & out of padded boots, and if you can include hoof photos, including squarely from side-on at ground level, sole shots, etc, as the single view xrays(esp as the vet hasn't bothered to mark the feet or even measure angles!) doesn't give enough to be informed enough IMO.



*Firstly, I am NOT meaning this to be a judgement, as I am not assuming to know any more than those few words you've told about the situation, which I know may have given me the wrong idea... But that just doesn't sound like he was 'rehabbed' at all, if he finally got so bad he couldn't get up.

A lot of people seem to have the idea that if they 'rescue' a horse, so long as they improve the situation, so long as the horse is getting a better deal than it was before, then that's fine & dandy. A lot of people seem to not care, or be oblivious of(or refuse to see) a horse's level of suffering. Or at least, that if they're not suffering as bad as they once were, or if it's not constantly bad, then that is OK. I am very much of the view of 'quality over quantity' - just because you CAN keep the horse alive and in a better situation than they came from, doesn't mean you SHOULD, that it's good enough. If they're still suffering, without hope of actual rehab, or if that suffering is going to be long term, then I truly don't think it's fair to put them through all that, for the sake of not wanting to let them go - death may be the kindest option in many cases if they're 'too far gone'.

So, again, not judging your comment, but just try to be very considerate & objective(don't let what you WANT to see/believe influence what you ARE seeing) about how the horse is feeling/coping. What real, honest chance is there for them to 'come good', how long is it going to take, for them to be suffering in the meantime, how well can you manage and minimise that suffering...

So, what I see from the rads...

The first one, the good foot(relatively). There is no real loss/remodelling of the tip of P3. The joint spacing of P2/P3 is a little uneven, navicular bone looks low on the joint & nav. area looks a little... messy, but I'm not an expert on rads & I'd also want to see better rads/different angles for more detail of that.

I've drawn green lines on it for what I am seeing that's good/right; The bones appear to be pretty well aligned with eachother & the distal angle(ground surface) of P3 is raised around 7 degrees at the heel(normal) ; The dorsal wall is pretty well aligned(parallel) with the dorsal aspect of P3; There appears to be adequate sole depth under the tip of P3(assuming sole comes to near bottom of pic, as vet hasn't marked).
View attachment 1115809
I've drawn red lines for what I see as obvious probs; that is, assuming(because vet hasn't marked) the top horizontal line is at the coronary border, that the line marking the top of the extensor process(top tip of P3) is a lot lower than that, whereas it should be close to level, or even slightly higher - this shows the hoof capsule has been pushed up around the bony column. Or alternatively, you could say the hoof has 'sunk' low within the capsule. And the toe is a little too long/forward - the red curved line is approx how I'd like to see/trim it.

The other foot... There is a fair amount of bone loss & also a 'ski tip' at the tip(what's left) of P3, showing the damage has been very chronic - going on more than just the last few years. There's an interesting... mess above that ski tip too. Looks quite 'porous', lacking density what is left at that tip but I can't tell from that rad where the terminal arch/major vascular channels are, except to say there's not much below them. Generally if the bone loss reaches the terminal arch, that can be considered... terminal.

Also seems to be some ringbone(osteo arthritis), including articular(in the joint) which will be painful & irrepairable - articular ringbone pain can often be managed adequately with painkillers, until such time as the joint fuses completely & the horse may become pain free - weighing up whether that is all worth it is another thing. Nav. region is all messy too, looks like there's at least some bone remodelling/calcification around the impar lig.

Red lines show the bony column isn't aligned - P3 is 'broken forward', angled steeper than the other phalanges, with distal angle of P3 quite steep. Dorsal wall is not aligned with P3, flares forward quite a bit. Sole is quite thin under P3 & bones sitting low in the capsule. Curved line at toe shows how much excess & approx where I'd keep it trimmed to. None of these factors(of the red lines) is 'incurable', but given the amount of arthritic changes in the joints, it's possible that even attempting to 'improve' angles will cause more harm - so it might be a question of whether you can just manage what you've got adequately, without changing much(except 'backing up' & beveling the toe).
View attachment 1115810

This is SO helpful. These lines are extremely helpful! I also thought it was strange that the vet didn't mark it up in any way. She is new to our area, and I believe just got her degree a couple years ago. She is young. Now I'm wondering if I need a new vet too... agh! She did notate "possible" arthritis but that was it. I honestly had more questions when she left than answers.

Some things that have been done since her first trim: her hoof was way misshapen, so she's more "round" from the top, with trying to take as little from the sole as possible and just backing up the toe and lowering her heels. About 3 CM has been taken from her toe so far. Every 3 weeks it's minimal trims but trying to keep that backed up.
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Here are some pictures of Rosie, side views/front view of hoof and underneath. The bottom is a bit dark from moisture (she's been in her boots overnight - I take them off in the morning for about an hour or so).

I'm also trying to attach a video of her walking (with boots) but it isn't uploading so I made a "gif"

Walking in Boots

^that's the link for GIF.

Please forgive me as I don't know how to format on here yet. I am working on it so that it is more organized and cleaner!! :)


Regarding rehabbed gelding - that was a completely different case and I can assure you all measures were taken with vet, farrier, me, everyone... He was an ex rodeo horse and the issue came down to his deep digital flexor tendon and again, really damaged inner hoof. Backwards shoes, previcox, to going barefoot, regular shoes, diet, home, we tried everything. I had 2 vets come out and tell me that they had known what I tried and that if it didn't work it was never going to work, and to give him some dignity. I'm tearing up writing this out. That one is a very sore subject for me....
 

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I agree with you. I am feeling a lot of resistance from BF trimmer. She is saying that there is no wall integrity for nails. I asked about FormaHoof and have looked it up, but there is a not a practitioner anywhere near me (San Diego).
There are many, many options that don't require nails nowadays - it's quite incredible. I wouldn't give up right away as horses are truly resilient creatures and as long as she continues to have the 'want' to live (and you have the budget to treat her), I think there is a lot of hope.

Formahoof does have a course on their website if you find any farrier that would be willing to give it a try. It's a big investment at the start, which is why my personal trimmer hasn't started offering it yet, but she hopes to in the future.
 
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
There are many, many options that don't require nails nowadays - it's quite incredible. I wouldn't give up right away as horses are truly resilient creatures and as long as she continues to have the 'want' to live (and you have the budget to treat her), I think there is a lot of hope.

Formahoof does have a course on their website if you find any farrier that would be willing to give it a try. It's a big investment at the start, which is why my personal trimmer hasn't started offering it yet, but she hopes to in the future.
My dream is to have FormaHoof so I am going to do some more research on it. I believe each mould is ~$400. I might be willing to get this myself.

She has SO much fight in her and a willingness to try. Through all of this pain she never once hasn't allowed me to pick up her foot and sit there perfectly quiet (even on the bad one), and when I pull out her lead she comes right to me. First thing in the morning she wants to nuzzle. I truly am willing to do what it takes for her.
 

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Where in Southern California? I found a couple of farrier prospects in Fallbrook, Ramona, and Menifee.


You might look further north, into Riverside County, or northern San Diego County for a mobile vet.

I used Dr. Beck, in Hemet, when I lived in Romoland but he was moving himself into equine reproduction when I left I. 2003. Looking at his website, that is all he does now.

Edited to add: when she has to stand on the worst hoof, double up a bath towel and stick it under that hoof to give her added comfort:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Which side of San Diego? I found a couple of farrier prospects in Fallbrook, Ramona, and Menifee.


You might look further north, into Riverside County, or northern San Diego County for a mobile vet.

I used Dr. Beck, in Hemet, when I lived in Romoland but he was moving himself into equine reproduction when I left I. 2003. Looking at his website, that is all he does now.

Edited to add: when she has to stand on the worst hoof, double up a bath towel and stick it under that hoof to give her added comfort:)
I contacted Reed Hanney on that page and was expecting a call last night. I'll try to call him this morning. Looks like he has quite a bit of experience! =)
 

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I live in Northern San Diego and contacted Reed Hanney on that page and was expecting a call last night. I'll try to call him this morning. Looks like he has quite a bit of experience! =)
Yes, I took a second look at him as well. I hope you hear back from him:)
 
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Just make sure you keep the horses quality of life in mind. I've seen many people put foundered horses through a lot of agony for a long time. All in the name of saving it ,and end result was PTS.

Sometimes it's kinder to put them down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Just make sure you keep the horses quality of life in mind. I've seen many people put foundered horses through a lot of agony for a long time. All in the name of saving it ,and end result was PTS.

Sometimes it's kinder to put them down.
Yes! This is my top priority. Right now, even though she's in pain, she still has a lot of perk to her. Honestly for t
 

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Yes, there is plenty of room for hope.......providing.

BOTH feet have the breakover point too far forward. If left, the 'good' foot may in time begin to look like the rotated foot.

The rotated foot has a very thin sole. The breakover point should be carefully placed using measurements from the x-ray. The heel should begin to be lowered at once. If possible, I would remove 1/8th inch per week. The coffin bone has dropped close to 3/4 inch inside the hoof capsule and getting the heel down and the coffin bone in line with the bones above it is the only way the the dropped coffin bone will ever be reversed.

And if the dropped coffin bone is not reversed, the sole thickness will never increase. The leverage at the too long toe must also be removed.

40 years ago heart bar shoes were the only known way to treat the problem your horse has. They can still be helpful with a VERY knowledgeable and skilled farrier in heart bar application which there are few of now-a-days.

The problem I see with shoes is that the heel needs to be lowered as aggressively as possible. That can be monitored by observing how the horse walks. It simply cannot be done and undone with shoes as quickly as it can with boots.

If too much heel is taken off and the horse begins toe-walking, heels can be added to the back of the boots until the tendons stretch out. I have done this.

Lowering the heels with shoeing cycles increases the recovery time and actually the chances of recovery.

The horse needs to be in boots as much as possible and kept in footing that he is comfortable in during times the boots are off.

This works and is the leading edge of treating laminitis. I would strongly suggest you spend some time at: The Laminitis Site

Your horse NEEDS for you to spend time there. Good luck.


1115839
 

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I should have added, when hoof boots and pads are used, added support for the frog should be added if the frog does not reach the pad surface. This is usually done with the addition of epoxy "clay" sole packing or adding triangular padding under the frog. The main support for the coffin bone is the laminae and the frog below it. With a foot that severely rotated, there is very little laminae connection making it doubly important to provide support under the frog.

This was the original reasoning behind the heart bar shoe but compared to recent innovations and discoveries, there are now better and more successful ways. Too much pressure from a rigid heart bar and the pain is increased. It is just so touchy using metal. Using material the consistency of a healthy frog is much more forgiving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
She actually looks better than I thought she would in that video. Best of luck to you.
This was before her most recent episode last week, and then she was trimmed a few days ago so is VERY sore. It's constantly up and down. Some days she seems like she's on the mend, them boom... lame and can't turn. :/

Thank you for your well wishes. I really hope she is able to become comfortable soon.
 

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She actually looks better than I thought she would in that video. Best of luck to you.
I think so too — she reminds me a lot of Joker who said “I can do this if you help me”, every single day of his pain.

I also think she looks a whole lot healthier in the still fotos than some horses who don’t have anything at all wrong with them.

She deserves a chance, if @okilydokily can put the money into her.

Also, sole depth was mentioned by someone. FWIW, Joker’s sole depth improved markedly after we got him out of the steel shoeing package and into the composit shoes with flexible pads and packing.

The sports medicine vet did the x-rays in September, 2020 and again in March or April of this year. Even he was amazed at the sole depth Joker has gained since these composite shoes went on.

The issue with boots and padding is that nothing is consistent. Boots need to come off and be cleaned plus the packing doesn’t stay in place.

The purpose of the “riser” pads is so the heels can be lowered, then slightly raised back up, according to what the farrier thinks will benefit the horse <—- this is part of why I recommend finding a therapeutic farrier who has been trained to rehab these kinds of hooves.

Messing around with movable parts inside a boot in the case of this horse, is not what I would do — because I did do it with Joker and it was a failure, not an epic failure but it was a failure.

The composite shoes with a flexible pad (rise of pad TBD) and packing, keeps the hooves stabilize, the composite shoes reduce concussion better than hoof boots, and they flex when the horse walks. In time, the horse’s comfort level goes up to where pain meds may not be needed or at least not as frequent.

If Joker had not developed low Ringbone, he would not need Previcox for the farrier to work on him, since the composite shoes went on him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Yes, there is plenty of room for hope.......providing.

BOTH feet have the breakover point too far forward. If left, the 'good' foot may in time begin to look like the rotated foot.

The rotated foot has a very thin sole. The breakover point should be carefully placed using measurements from the x-ray. The heel should begin to be lowered at once. If possible, I would remove 1/8th inch per week. The coffin bone has dropped close to 3/4 inch inside the hoof capsule and getting the heel down and the coffin bone in line with the bones above it is the only way the the dropped coffin bone will ever be reversed.

And if the dropped coffin bone is not reversed, the sole thickness will never increase. The leverage at the too long toe must also be removed.

40 years ago heart bar shoes were the only known way to treat the problem your horse has. They can still be helpful with a VERY knowledgeable and skilled farrier in heart bar application which there are few of now-a-days.

The problem I see with shoes is that the heel needs to be lowered as aggressively as possible. That can be monitored by observing how the horse walks. It simply cannot be done and undone with shoes as quickly as it can with boots.

If too much heel is taken off and the horse begins toe-walking, heels can be added to the back of the boots until the tendons stretch out. I have done this.

Lowering the heels with shoeing cycles increases the recovery time and actually the chances of recovery.

The horse needs to be in boots as much as possible and kept in footing that he is comfortable in during times the boots are off.

This works and is the leading edge of treating laminitis. I would strongly suggest you spend some time at: The Laminitis Site

Your horse NEEDS for you to spend time there. Good luck.


View attachment 1115839
I should have added, when hoof boots and pads are used, added support for the frog should be added if the frog does not reach the pad surface. This is usually done with the addition of epoxy "clay" sole packing or adding triangular padding under the frog. The main support for the coffin bone is the laminae and the frog below it. With a foot that severely rotated, there is very little laminae connection making it doubly important to provide support under the frog.

This was the original reasoning behind the heart bar shoe but compared to recent innovations and discoveries, there are now better and more successful ways. Too much pressure from a rigid heart bar and the pain is increased. It is just so touchy using metal. Using material the consistency of a healthy frog is much more forgiving.
Thank you! And thank you for the new resource. I am heading there now. Do you think her heels are too low in the pictures I posted? I thought they had come down quite a bit. But now that I look at it, the angle is quite high.

I will keep her shoe free for the time being. Another thing I've just started her on is a mineral to try to load her with good stuff for her feet, given with bermuda pellets.
 
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