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The heel should begin to be lowered at once. If possible, I would remove 1/8th inch per week
That could well be a bad move, just causing the horse more unnecessary pain. From the sounds of it, op understands the basic idea of how to 'realign' a foot. If only it were that simple. As it appears there is osteoarthritis likely in the joints(articular ringtone), I'd want a vet experienced about this & better rads done, before deciding whether ANY heel should be removed.
 

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Also, sole depth was mentioned by someone. FWIW, Joker’s sole depth improved markedly after we got him out of the steel shoeing package and into the composit shoes with flexible pads and packing.
That is VERY interesting to me - & heartening to hear! Knowing that this difference has come about since he was in boots, despite that in his case too, due to articular ringbone, actually realigning the bones cannot happen, yet sole depth has improved anyway. Ace!
 

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I started Rusty and Kirby on Equinity. To soon to tell if it is helping Rusty, rotated p3 on a slight club foot. It has helped Kirby who would stock up so bad he looked like he had stove pipes for hind legs. Kirby has horse legs again and that happened after been on Equinity for only 2 weeks. Rusty will run and buck and not take a lame step as long as he has on pads and shoes. I also started Rusty on Remission . We will need to see what the farrier has to say next time he is out. I have added a couple of other horses onto the remission as they are fatties. One draft mix mare and one quarter horse. Chunky hunks of horse flesh. lol. They get fat on air.
 

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Thank you! And thank you for the new resource. I am heading there now. Do you think her heels are too low in the pictures I posted? I thought they had come down quite a bit. But now that I look at it, the angle is quite high.
My comment about the heel needing to be lowered is based on the misalignment of the coffin bone with the two bones above it. Lowering the heel is the quickest way to realign. Plus that will take upward pressure or leverage off the hoof capsule which pushes it up and away from the coffin bone as it "tries" to grow down attached.

However, as Pete Ramey mentions in his article with the four drawings (which have been on my desktop for a couple years), lowering the heel must be done carefully, gradually, and with care. If the coffin has been rotated for some time, the deep digital flexor tendon (the tendon that attaches to the rear of the coffin and runs up the leg) may have shortened somewhat. Just as ours would if not stretched constantly.

In those cases, lowering the heel too much and too fast will put a painful strain on that tendon and the horse will sometimes be seen actually walking without his heel touching the ground.

I am dealing with that problem at the moment. Watching closely how the horse moves and stands and checking if there is pressure on the heel/ground surface will tell if too much heel has been removed or if more should be removed. If too much has been removed and the horse is in boots, it's easy to add some heel to the boots. If the horse is putting a lot of pressure on the heel and making heel first landings at a walk, more can be removed. Ideally, the heel will be lowered to the level of the live sole. The dead retained sole is chalky with the live sole turning waxy like. But the foot must be moist for the chalky to be easily determined. When hard and dry, it can be difficult. An over night soaking in soak boots will usually make the retained/live sole become more readily determined.

Someone, don't remember for certain who, even takes a tad off the live sole at the heel in extreme cases. Those usually have laterals taken at 4 week intervals.

Some bevel the toe at a 45 at the breakover point and some chop it vertically off just past the breakover point providing the lamellar wedge is solid and not infected and then 45 it. I personally have a hard time doing that but that stuff sticking out front doesn't do a thing for the horse. And that lamellar wedge is hard as a hoof. Those that do chop it off, (Daisy Bicking I believe does) say recovery and rehab is much faster.

Let me introduce you to the term CE Measurement. And with that you will see the 'good' foot needs some corrective trimming also.

Here, I'll let Pete do it: How to Reverse Coffin Bone Sinking
 
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
My comment about the heel needing to be lowered is based on the misalignment of the coffin bone with the two bones above it. Lowering the heel is the quickest way to realign. Plus that will take upward pressure or leverage off the hoof capsule which pushes it up and away from the coffin bone as it "tries" to grow down attached.

However, as Pete Ramey mentions in his article with the four drawings (which have been on my desktop for a couple years), lowering the heel must be done carefully, gradually, and with care. If the coffin has been rotated for some time, the deep digital flexor tendon (the tendon that attaches to the rear of the coffin and runs up the leg) may have shortened somewhat. Just as ours would if not stretched constantly.

In those cases, lowering the heel too much and too fast will put a painful strain on that tendon and the horse will sometimes be seen actually walking without his heel touching the ground.

I am dealing with that problem at the moment. Watching closely how the horse moves and stands and checking if there is pressure on the heel/ground surface will tell if too much heel has been removed or if more should be removed. If too much has been removed and the horse is in boots, it's easy to add some heel to the boots. If the horse is putting a lot of pressure on the heel and making heel first landings at a walk, more can be removed. Ideally, the heel will be lowered to the level of the live sole. The dead retained sole is chalky with the live sole turning waxy like. But the foot must be moist for the chalky to be easily determined. When hard and dry, it can be difficult. An over night soaking in soak boots will usually make the retained/live sole become more readily determined.

Someone, don't remember for certain who, even takes a tad off the live sole at the heel in extreme cases. Those usually have laterals taken at 4 week intervals.

Some bevel the toe at a 45 at the breakover point and some chop it vertically off just past the breakover point providing the lamellar wedge is solid and not infected and then 45 it. I personally have a hard time doing that but that stuff sticking out front doesn't do a thing for the horse. And that lamellar wedge is hard as a hoof. Those that do chop it off, (Daisy Bicking I believe does) say recovery and rehab is much faster.

Let me introduce you to the term CE Measurement. And with that you will see the 'good' foot needs some corrective trimming also.

Here, I'll let Pete do it: How to Reverse Coffin Bone Sinking
She isn’t 100% sound on her right “good” hoof either. I am sure this is why! I wonder if it would be worth it to get aVenogram done (shown at the bottom of the article) to see how the blood flow and tendons are doing right now on both foot. I imagine LF is very bad. I’ve been told the laminae may be severed structurally altogether. I am hoping (with worse case expectations) that is not the case…

Her heel has been taken down about 1/4” each of the last two trims. I hadn’t touched it at first because I was afraid to do any more damage. Interestingly enough, she is more lame after these last 2 trims by the new trimmer. The deep digital flexor may be the issue?

I was originally using the Soft Ride boots with the laminitis gel insert that has the frog mounded in to get blood flow pumping. They were great, but after a couple trims were too big. The trimmer gave me an older pair of something she had with foam pads with a raised heel to promote more heel landing so she takes the weight off her toes.

I’m going to take a video of her walking in these boots in the morning. She is still trying to land toe first.
 

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The deep digital flexor may be the issue?
Yep. Very well could be. Too much too fast. Eventually not too much but for now could be.

For adding heel height, I use some pieces of worn Steward Clogs. EDSS Steward Horse Hoof Clog

I'm using ScootBoots with the tread entirely removed. Steward clogs are attached with screw from the boot down into the clogs. There's a technique involved.

Then I'll cut a piece of worn clog, 1/4, 1/2, r 3/4 thick and use two screws to attach to the heel from the bottom. All depending on the horse of course. I have also used pieces of pads at the heel to raise it but they are hard to keep in place.

I cut my own closed cell neoprene pads from material I buy from McMaster-Carr . I use a density that is very close to the easycare stiff pad. It last at least 20 times as long or longer.

I don't want to alarm you, but this horse's proper care will require a long term commitment and lots and lots of time. And a bit of money. Without that, the worst foot is in route to causing euthanasia.

It's hard to see a horse in pain and a caring person wants to give something to relieve the pain. Problem is, bute is bad for laminitis. If the horse is willing to get around a bit and willing to be led for exercise, I like to stay away from pain meds. Thing is, if you do something wrong that should make the foot hurt but the horse is on meds, how will you know.

On the other hand, a horse in any condition needs some exercise. Sometimes both people and horses almost have to be forced into the physical therapy they need. In those cases, pain meds other than bute can be helpful for the horse.

Oh, as far as a venogram, my take is that is done for research or to form a prognosis. That's only my opinion from what little I've read about them. There is little doubt that the blood flow in the bad foot has been permanently reduced forever. But that doesn't mean there won't be enough to regain soundness. And the venogram cannot predict how much the circulatory system of the foot will recover when the coffin is rotated off the circumflex artery upon which it is certainly now resting.

I want to qualify all I've said. I'm not a professional but I do read and study a bit. What I or anybody on a forum says, should be taken to a professional person or site for verification. There's enough incorrect info from professionals let alone non-professionals.

Pete Ramey, Daisy Bicking, Gene Ovnisek are all top professionals. There are other but those are my favorite three.
 
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Another thought about removing 1/4 inch on the heels the last two trims.

If the horse is on a surface where little to no hoof wall is worn off between trims, the heels will grow 1/4 inch in 4-6 weeks so that it is possible to remove that much without lowering the heels at all.

A laminitic horse will grow hoof wall at the heel faster than at the toe. Reason: there more movement during rotation between the hoof wall and coffin at the toe than at the heel. So less vascular damage at the heel than at the toe.

This s the reason there is a curvature in the growth rings at the heel. It's growing faster so it curves down.

Try to accurately measure the distance from the hairline at the heel to the bottom. Record and keep a record. Just guessing at it from a distance is not a good way to go.

Then see to it that the hairline gradually gets closer to the ground. And watching for any signs of toe walking.

Another method I use to keep pressure off the toe, along with the Steward Clog that has a breakover well behind normal, I cut off about one inch of the pad and zip tie it to the back of the boot so it doesn't slip forward. That gives the toe a huge relief. When the Steward Clog is applied directly to the hoof, there is a depression where the tip of the coffin rests to relieve some pressure on the tip.

But I cannot wait four weeks to see what's up with the bottom of the hoof. That's why I like boots.
 
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Do you think her heels are too low in the pictures I posted? I thought they had come down quite a bit. But now that I look at it, the angle is quite high.
Cannot tell from those pics sorry, altho the sole pic makes it look as if caudal foot may be too thin already too - so may well be that you can't afford to take much if any heel.

So again, I caution you not to lop off heel or otherwise change angles, without expert advice. And as said, it may not be advisable to change bone angle at all, depending on joint damage.

If it is deemed best to 'realign', heels need lowering &/or angles changing **gradually & with full consideration of how the horse is feeling about it all. Because tendon strain is FAR from the only worry about doing it aggressively/too much/too quickly.

Incidentally, it is a misunderstanding that tendons shorten or stretch. Tendons, like ligaments, are hardly elastic at all - It is the muscles that need to gradually stretch if a horse is high heeled & dropping heels too quickly can cause(among other probs) tendon damage... Ask Walkin for her unfortunate experience of this! But tendons are only one consideration regarding dropping heels.
 

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1. Yes, I sure do have my own gut wrenching tendon experience when Joker first foundered in 2012.

There were ultrasounds by the lameness vet to prove what that loser farrier did. I knew it was bad when I saw the vet’s face turning purple from the neck up.

The farrier btw was AFA certified and all up in himself - he still arrogantly writes papers for a certain journal but that doesn’t make him worth a pinch of salt with a pair of nippers.

On the third trim he did what he wanted, instead of what the lameness vet wanted and the result was torn tendons on both fronts.

It took me 11 - ELEVEN - months to get Joker healed. I still have the videos.

2. I have trimmed my own horses off/on since I was 12. I didn’t want to but I took Joker’s hooves back for awhile and I had his hooves under control. My own issues forced me to stop trimming everyone. The farriers, in my area, who were knowledgeable were only good with healthy feet - they had zero clue what to do with hooves in need of serious rehab and soon Joker started paying for that.

It was a blessing the day I found the therapeutic farrier and a bigger blessing that she is only 30 miles from me. She could have been in the next state and I would have paid her.

3. I hope you hear back from the farrier you called or texted because experimenting with some of the things that have been suggested here, is not the way to go with this horse. You could end up doing more harm than good and she may never recover.

Boots with some padding are great until you can get a therapeutic farrier on board - just don’t forget to clean the insides of them once daily to keep the gunk from building:)

3.1. It is great that the new member trailscout is taking the time to explain things via his or her readings and possibly personal experience, as long as you yourself don’t attempt any of those things.

Monkey-fussing, non-qualified attempts at helping that severely rotated hoof is not going to bring about progress or healing.

Your horse has way too much damage to be an experimental learning instrument. Keep reading and gain knowledge — just please do not try any of that stuff yourself:)

For example, you would easily attempt (and in most cases, successfully) to medicate an open wound on yourself but what would you do if you discovered a streak of blood poisoning going up your leg or arm? You would get yourself to a credentialed physician “five minutes ago”.

Your mare’s severely rotated hoof is “credentialed rehab farrier” time, just as soon as you can find one who is trained and well versed in therapy.

The one hoof was elevated to needing specialized attention before you even brought her home. I know the horse came from family but —- a huge shame on them for not listening to you early on. As you have already stated, this could have all been avoided if they had listened to you.

In case it got lost in my ramblings — did the farrier you contacted get back to you?
 

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Do you stretch muscles or tendons?

Kieran Coghlan
, MS + research in exercise physiology & biomechanics, 2nd MS + research in biomedical engineering
Answered September 22, 2014

Both. You can't stretch one without the other. Muscles are attached to bones via tendons. Muscles are contractile though, so they take up most of the stretch. Tendons stretch too, just not as much. Imagine a rubber band with two pieces of twine or string on either end. Pull each end and you stretch the rubber band... mostly. The string will also be under tension, so it is also getting stretched, just not as much. You might ask, "if the muscle stretches most/first, how can one ever injure ("strain") a tendon?" This is complicated, but has to do with the fact that muscles produce force, and in "eccentric" movements (muscle is forced to lengthen against effort) which are the cause of many such injuries, the force can get very large, so large that the tendon is injured, even though the muscle is not (or is injured less so). Muscles also recover from injury faster than tendons, since tendons have very little blood supply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
1. Yes, I sure do have my own gut wrenching tendon experience when Joker first foundered in 2012.

There were ultrasounds by the lameness vet to prove what that loser farrier did. I knew it was bad when I saw the vet’s face turning purple from the neck up.

The farrier btw was AFA certified and all up in himself - he still arrogantly writes papers for a certain journal but that doesn’t make him worth a pinch of salt with a pair of nippers.

On the third trim he did what he wanted, instead of what the lameness vet wanted and the result was torn tendons on both fronts.

It took me 11 - ELEVEN - months to get Joker healed. I still have the videos.

2. I have trimmed my own horses off/on since I was 12. I didn’t want to but I took Joker’s hooves back for awhile and I had his hooves under control. My own issues forced me to stop trimming everyone. The farriers, in my area, who were knowledgeable were only good with healthy feet - they had zero clue what to do with hooves in need of serious rehab and soon Joker started paying for that.

It was a blessing the day I found the therapeutic farrier and a bigger blessing that she is only 30 miles from me. She could have been in the next state and I would have paid her.

3. I hope you hear back from the farrier you called or texted because experimenting with some of the things that have been suggested here, is not the way to go with this horse. You could end up doing more harm than good and she may never recover.

Boots with some padding are great until you can get a therapeutic farrier on board - just don’t forget to clean the insides of them once daily to keep the gunk from building:)

3.1. It is great that the new member trailscout is taking the time to explain things via his or her readings and possibly personal experience, as long as you yourself don’t attempt any of those things.

Monkey-fussing, non-qualified attempts at helping that severely rotated hoof is not going to bring about progress or healing.

Your horse has way too much damage to be an experimental learning instrument. Keep reading and gain knowledge — just please do not try any of that stuff yourself:)

For example, you would easily attempt (and in most cases, successfully) to medicate an open wound on yourself but what would you do if you discovered a streak of blood poisoning going up your leg or arm? You would get yourself to a credentialed physician “five minutes ago”.

Your mare’s severely rotated hoof is “credentialed rehab farrier” time, just as soon as you can find one who is trained and well versed in therapy.

The one hoof was elevated to needing specialized attention before you even brought her home. I know the horse came from family but —- a huge shame on them for not listening to you early on. As you have already stated, this could have all been avoided if they had listened to you.

In case it got lost in my ramblings — did the farrier you contacted get back to you?
I have not heard back, so bummed! Something interesting this morning... she's got a LOT of pep in her step, standing very straight, walking confidently (albeit still taking pressure off "bad" hoof quickly). This was how she looked before her last episode, so I REALLY want to get a therapeutic farrier ASAP because if she gets glue ons (or what ever may be recommended) now, that would be fantastic!

I'm not going to touch her feet, I decided. While I feel like I'm capable, this really is for a professional. I know that one wrong step or too much taken from any part leaves potential for more pain and I just can't stomach putting her through more. The fact that the last two trims have done that really upset me as it is.

I am reaching out to him again this morning, if I don't hear back pretty quickly, I'll move down the list. But yeah, the way she looks today would be super ideal to have someone come check her out NOW!

And the avoid-ability of all of this really makes me red lately. It's not even a money issue (they have plenty of that..) It's a pride issue. And thinking because they've owned horses for 50+ years that they know all.) So I'm going to do myself a favor and learn from them and get as many qualified people on board to help her as I can.

I appreciate your responses more than you know. I am hoping that my sweet mare can be like Joker, and fight this like heck with knowledge and care on her side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Cannot tell from those pics sorry, altho the sole pic makes it look as if caudal foot may be too thin already too - so may well be that you can't afford to take much if any heel.

So again, I caution you not to lop off heel or otherwise change angles, without expert advice. And as said, it may not be advisable to change bone angle at all, depending on joint damage.

If it is deemed best to 'realign', heels need lowering &/or angles changing **gradually & with full consideration of how the horse is feeling about it all. Because tendon strain is FAR from the only worry about doing it aggressively/too much/too quickly.

Incidentally, it is a misunderstanding that tendons shorten or stretch. Tendons, like ligaments, are hardly elastic at all - It is the muscles that need to gradually stretch if a horse is high heeled & dropping heels too quickly can cause(among other probs) tendon damage... Ask Walkin for her unfortunate experience of this! But tendons are only one consideration regarding dropping heels.
Yes, I'm not going to touch her feet. I know I need a real therapeutic professional for this! I tried, new trimmer tried, but I don't think she should have been as sore as she is post trim. So I'm putting a stop to anything more experimental and going to get someone with results over here ASAP. Now if they'd just return my calls!
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Yep. Very well could be. Too much too fast. Eventually not too much but for now could be.

For adding heel height, I use some pieces of worn Steward Clogs. EDSS Steward Horse Hoof Clog

I'm using ScootBoots with the tread entirely removed. Steward clogs are attached with screw from the boot down into the clogs. There's a technique involved.

Then I'll cut a piece of worn clog, 1/4, 1/2, r 3/4 thick and use two screws to attach to the heel from the bottom. All depending on the horse of course. I have also used pieces of pads at the heel to raise it but they are hard to keep in place.

I cut my own closed cell neoprene pads from material I buy from McMaster-Carr . I use a density that is very close to the easycare stiff pad. It last at least 20 times as long or longer.

I don't want to alarm you, but this horse's proper care will require a long term commitment and lots and lots of time. And a bit of money. Without that, the worst foot is in route to causing euthanasia.

It's hard to see a horse in pain and a caring person wants to give something to relieve the pain. Problem is, bute is bad for laminitis. If the horse is willing to get around a bit and willing to be led for exercise, I like to stay away from pain meds. Thing is, if you do something wrong that should make the foot hurt but the horse is on meds, how will you know.

On the other hand, a horse in any condition needs some exercise. Sometimes both people and horses almost have to be forced into the physical therapy they need. In those cases, pain meds other than bute can be helpful for the horse.

Oh, as far as a venogram, my take is that is done for research or to form a prognosis. That's only my opinion from what little I've read about them. There is little doubt that the blood flow in the bad foot has been permanently reduced forever. But that doesn't mean there won't be enough to regain soundness. And the venogram cannot predict how much the circulatory system of the foot will recover when the coffin is rotated off the circumflex artery upon which it is certainly now resting.

I want to qualify all I've said. I'm not a professional but I do read and study a bit. What I or anybody on a forum says, should be taken to a professional person or site for verification. There's enough incorrect info from professionals let alone non-professionals.

Pete Ramey, Daisy Bicking, Gene Ovnisek are all top professionals. There are other but those are my favorite three.
Thank you!
Do you have a picture of what these clogs look like?

She certainly is behind on exercise because she's been too lame to take out for hand walking. My other mare does get her to move around, though. Other mare has actually become very protective of Rosie and stays by her side 24/7. When Rosie is standing for long periods of time, other mare will walk up by hind end and give her a little shove and they walk around for a few minutes then she stands next to her until they walk again. So she is moving, but not as much as she may need. I just don't want to over do anything right now
 

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Do you have a picture of what these clogs look like?
watch this video and please notice this is a VET doing the appplication and also PLEASE note that his first comment was this horse has MILD laminitis and shows the x-ray. There is much less issue with the video hoof than what your mare is dealing with.

While I am personally dead set against clogs, that doesn’t mean they don’t have their place in some treatments of founder. BUT clogs should not be applied (initially at least) by the owner with zero knowledge of hoof care, except for basic hoof picking maintenance.

This is equally as serious business as putting shoes on because the hoof has to be correctly trimmed and the person doing the trimming has to have a good understanding not only of correct heel height but also breakover.



still foto of Steward clogs:

 

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Yes, I have real problem with an owner attaching anything to a hoof. Shoeing is extremely hard, I don't do it on my own I do a few hooves with my farrier helping. My horses have zero hoof issues and I still am cautious. If it were my horse, I would not attempt any rehab myself, I would get a rehab farrier. In fact, I would seek out a rehab barn. My friend used to run one but there are a few others. If you can't find one, other than a barefoot trimmer, that poor horse is going to endure more pain . Even if her hooves were fixed tomorrow, she will need other treatments for her body. When a horse is lame like that, the whole body compensates and gets out of whack. Just my opinion.
 

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Do you have a picture of what these clogs look like?
Yes and a little history. The clogs were developed by a man whose last name was Steward. He used plywood beveled all around to allow the horse to more easily tilt his foot this way and that to find the most comfortable position plus a little more cost effective option for owners that did not have a $150,000 Thoroughbred. I'm thinking that was a little over 10 years ago.

Gene Ovnicek, who founded Equine Lameness Prevention Organization, Inc. - Powered by AMO requested and received the blessings from Steward to make the clog using synthetics.

They are one of Gene's main protocols for dealing with laminitis. He attaches them directily to the foot after applying 2 part silicone epoxy Sole Support Impression Material - FIRM For Horse Feet. Matter of fact, I just applied some to my horse this morning to the back of the foot.

Soon after my horse suffered from laminitis I applied the clog directly although using a method quite different from what Gene uses. My horse was instantly 1,000% more comfortable. There's not many if any that I would place above Gene Ovnicek.

Gene made the clogs so they could have heels of differing heights attached to them. He has a video showing that. He believes the heel should be lowered to the live sole at once. Then heel height should be added to the clogs until the horse is landing heel first. He says that allows the hoof capsule to grow down attached while the hoof is in effect still rotated. I find it difficult to question anything he says.

The Arizona monsoons softened my horses hoof to the degree that I discovered a lot of retained sole at the heel. My bad for not determining that earlier. The heels were lowered at least 1/4 inch. Yep, he started walking around with his heel in the air. So another thing I did this morning was to remove the added heel on the bottom of the clog and add one that was about 1/4 inch higher. He's getting pressure on his heel again.

It is so important for as much loading as possible to be confined to the back half of the foot. This encourages the hoof wall to grow down connected in front which de-rotates the coffin.

My horse experienced a series of devastating events or we would now be going on trail rides again. Were it not for the clogs, I'm certain he would have gone down by now without the ability to get back up.

Link to the clog has been posted but here it is again. EDSS Steward Horse Hoof Clog

If you scroll down the link, there is a 50 minute video of the clog, it's applications, and uses.
 
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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Yes and a little history. The clogs were developed by a man whose last name was Steward. He used plywood beveled all around to allow the horse to more easily tilt his foot this way and that to find the most comfortable position plus a little more cost effective option for owners that did not have a $150,000 Thoroughbred. I'm thinking that was a little over 10 years ago.

Gene Ovnicek, who founded Equine Lameness Prevention Organization, Inc. - Powered by AMO requested and received the blessings from Steward to make the clog using synthetics.

They are one of Gene's main protocols for dealing with laminitis. He attaches them directily to the foot after applying 2 part silicone epoxy Sole Support Impression Material - FIRM For Horse Feet. Matter of fact, I just applied some to my horse this morning to the back of the foot.

Soon after my horse suffered from laminitis I applied the clog directly although using a method quite different from what Gene uses. My horse was instantly 1,000% more comfortable. There's not many if any that I would place above Gene Ovnicek.

Gene made the clogs so they could have heels of differing heights attached to them. He has a video showing that. He believes the heel should be lowered to the live sole at once. Then heel height should be added to the clogs until the horse is landing heel first. He says that allows the hoof capsule to grow down attached while the hoof is in effect still rotated. I find it difficult to question anything he says.

The Arizona monsoons softened my horses hoof to the degree that I discovered a lot of retained sole at the heel. My bad for not determining that earlier. The heels were lowered at least 1/4 inch. Yep, he started walking around with his heel in the air. So another thing I did this morning was to remove the added heel on the bottom of the clog and add one that was about 1/4 inch higher. He's getting pressure on his heel again.

It is so important for as much loading as possible to be confined to the back half of the foot. This encourages the hoof wall to grow down connected in front which de-rotates the coffin.

My horse experienced a series of devastating events or we would now be going on trail rides again. Were it not for the clogs, I'm certain he would have gone down by now without the ability to get back up.

Link to the clog has been posted but here it is again. EDSS Steward Horse Hoof Clog

If you scroll down the link, there is a 50 minute video of the clog, it's applications, and uses.
This is very interesting and seems people (you included) have great results! How do you use your application method? Are these clogs able to fit in boots? I ask because she is running through pads like crazy. Even firm ones are crushed within days.
 

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This is very interesting and seems people (you included) have great results! How do you use your application method? Are these clogs able to fit in boots? I ask because she is running through pads like crazy. Even firm ones are crushed within days.
Joker crushed thru pads at warp speed, when I had him in boots.

Clogs aren’t meant to be inside boots but here are a couple of things you can try:

1. For the boots I used 3/8” high density interlocking floor (exercise) mats and cut them to fit in the boots.


I bought mine at WalMart but, checking their website, they look like they only carry the 1/2” mats.

3/8” would be a more ideal thickness.

Cut them to fit just ahead of the heel bulbs and NOT to go beyond the tips of the frogs. Cut the sides either right to the whiteline or just inside the whiteline.

I duct taped them to Joker’s hooves then put his boots on. The tape kept the pads in place until I took his boots off at night.

1.1. A slick piece of trivia if eyou use this method:

Mark the hoof boots left & right and mark the sides of the pads that go against the boots left and right.

It will be jaw dropping what you can read from the patterns of wear on those pads. I gOt 3-4 days out of one set of pads and didn’t feel bad about pitching them because the interlocking mat pieces are so cheap.

2. If you don‘t want to keep using the boots, or they are wearing out:

Buy some Magic Cushion “performance strength with the Gold label.


Cover her front hooves entirely, with a generous amount. I used to pack shavings onto it and it would stay on Joker’s hooves for at least two days.

If you have a mare motel type set up and don’t bed her, duct tape will work but it will be bear to get off, lol

Wear latex gloves to put the Magic Cushion on as it will stick to your hands in a big way. Rubbing alcohol gets it off.

Those are two quick, fairy cheap, and very safe safe fixes until one of those farrier’s gets back to you. I’m disappointed in them.

3. I am so happy you are handing this over to a professional - at least until the crisis is over and someone of them feels you can manage on your own.

Just a thought and I’m not sure if this is appropriate but I might consider including the x-ray of her bad hoof in a text request. That will either scare the begeezus out of someone and they won’t return your call (which is good if they’re afraid to touch that), or a good therapeutic farrier will think “this woman needs help yesterday” .

You might also google “lameness vet’s” and “sports medicine vets” in your region. They should be better able to recommend a farrier over a general practice vet. You were giving thought to a new vet anyway, at least for this issue, so your search could be a double win for you:)

Given where you live and DelMar is in San Diego, I know there has to be a specialty vet somewhere in driving distance:). A track therapist might also be able to point you in the right direction:)
 
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This is very interesting and seems people (you included) have great results! How do you use your application method? Are these clogs able to fit in boots? I ask because she is running through pads like crazy. Even firm ones are crushed within days.
Initially, I predrilled all six holes in the hoof as Gene does for two holes in the video. Then I attached them with the two center holes, again a Gene does in the video. Then I drilled down from the top through the other 4 holes through the shoe and then put 4 screws in from the bottom. The two center screws were removed, drilled, and replaced from the bottom. I used a dremmel tool to cut off the tip of the protruding screws at the hoof wall.

I no longer do this as I prefer to be able to see and treat the bottom of the hoof more often than 4 weeks.

The clogs need to be in contact with the ground to function as they were designed to function.

I use closed cell neoprene purchased from McMaster. 1/4"by 12x12 inches. I have at the moment two pads in one boot and one pad in the other. On the foot with two pads 1" is removed from the toe to reduce toe pressure.

I use the 30A (soft) that "feels" very close to some stiff easycare pads I have. I've been using the current pads 24/7 for a year with a low activity horse.


If you scroll down the link below, there is a 50 minute video of Gene installing the clog on a horse with weak hoof walls.

 

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I started Rusty and Kirby on Equinity. To soon to tell if it is helping Rusty, rotated p3 on a slight club foot. It has helped Kirby who would stock up so bad he looked like he had stove pipes for hind legs. Kirby has horse legs again and that happened after been on Equinity for only 2 weeks. Rusty will run and buck and not take a lame step as long as he has on pads and shoes. I also started Rusty on Remission . We will need to see what the farrier has to say next time he is out. I have added a couple of other horses onto the remission as they are fatties. One draft mix mare and one quarter horse. Chunky hunks of horse flesh. lol. They get fat on air.
I 2nd Equinity and Remission. I had both horses (after moving from Iowa to SC) become laminitic. One developed severe rotation with ski-tipping while the other only had rotation. Over time each "recovered"; I stress...."MY" horses' diet, which kept them comfortable and rideable was: Equinity, Remission, Buckeye Ration Senior, and good quality hay - no pasture.

Good luck...its heartbreaking to watch and know that a relapse is always possible.

My one boy died 9 mos ago from an unknown cause (both horses had stopped eating their hay or drinking water) and my remaining boy and I relocated to Ohio where he is doing great! His diet remains the same with the addition of overnight-pasturing with a grazing muzzle on.
 
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