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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a new mare and was given the bit that the prior owners rode her in. she flips her head a bit but I really haven't worked her to much, just got her last weak. Our other horses are ridden in just a simple snaffle or hackamore. she doesn't seem to be hard mouthed at all so I'm just wondering if this bit would be considered a more aggressive bit? we do mainly trail riding would there be a better bit?
 

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Do you mean a harsh bit.? Any bit can be aggressive if used that way. That bit has a small amount of leverage , a very straight mouthpiece and some ribbing to the metal, so it could be harder on a mouth than a curved plain snaffle. Possibly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you mean a harsh bit.? Any bit can be aggressive if used that way. That bit has a small amount of leverage , a very straight mouthpiece and some ribbing to the metal, so it could be harder on a mouth than a curved plain snaffle. Possibly.

yes Harsh is the word I was looking for :) thanx
 

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The mouth pieces are wide, which would indicate that it'd normally be pretty mild. However, since the mouth pieces are ribbed, it does make it a bit more harsh. If she isn't hard mouthed at all, I'd see how she fares in one of your regular snaffle bits. Maybe a ring, eggbutt or a full cheek? No point in bit overkill if she's good in something you already have. Previous owners are not always right, as you may or may not have already discovered. :)
 

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Not harsh for a trained horse- if you been riding her with out the curb strap it aint working proper though- dont know how it would be harsh enough she is flinging her head up with it.

Might have the vet come see her teeth?
 

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That's not really harsh at all, however if she's flipping her head it might be because of the single jointed mouthpiece. Some horses don't like that, it tends to pinch slightly and a horse with a small mouth or shallow palette won't like it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not harsh for a trained horse- if you been riding her with out the curb strap it aint working proper though- dont know how it would be harsh enough she is flinging her head up with it.

Might have the vet come see her teeth?

I took the reins and chin trap off because I was going to switch everything over to my other bit, then thought Id get some advice first but left the head stall on for the pic :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanx every one for your advice!! I don't have a lot of people to bounce questions off so you guys really help :D
 

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The thicker the snaffle, the milder to bit. The wrap on the snaffle seems unnessecary though, is it loose? if you are in doubt... toss them out and go back to a smooth, thick snaffle. a three piece with a roller is even milder, if you are hard on the bit or inexperienced use that or do some ground work and use only a halter to steer
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The thicker the snaffle, the milder to bit. The wrap on the snaffle seems unnessecary though, is it loose? if you are in doubt... toss them out and go back to a smooth, thick snaffle. a three piece with a roller is even milder, if you are hard on the bit or inexperienced use that or do some ground work and use only a halter to steer
thanx, I have a 3 piece I can try too. im really soft handed actually that's why I was concerned with the head flipping. as soon as id pull back to stop she'd do the flip, flip.
 

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Like Sorrelhorse said, it's not a harsh bit at all. Due to the length of the shanks and where the mouth is located on them, it's got about the same pressure ratio as a regular snaffle. The only difference is that this bit will also apply pressure to the chin and the poll, giving you a bit of "lift and tuck" on a properly trained horse.

If she's flinging her head, my first stop would be the dentist to make sure her teeth aren't bothering her. After that, I would assume it is likely a training issue. Some horses who are ridden on short reins or who are cued too harshly come to hate mouth pressure...so they fling their head to alleviate it.

I see no reason why she wouldn't ride just as well in a regular old snaffle....though if it was me, I'd probably put her in something with a more solid mouth like a myler type and see if she'd start carrying the bit herself. That would help with the head-flinging.
 

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I don't think it is particularly harsh. It might be a bit confusing to her though. Start with the teeth then I would go back to a simple snaffle or bosal if you still have problems.
 

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FWIW, my guy did a lot of head tossing with any rein pressure in a single jointed mouth piece (what he was ridden in where I bought him) that went away completely and nearly instantly when I switched to a double jointed mouth piece. Worth a shot IMO anyway. Some horses mouths and single jointed bits just don't seem to go well together, though of course, it can be a training issue too.
 

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A thick mouthpiece isn't a milder bit than a thinner one. It can be, or not. For a long time, I thought my mare disliked 3 piece mouthpieces. But I've recently been riding her in this:





Based on a dozen rides or so, she seems very content in it. Looking back, the french link snaffles I own have thick mouthpieces. This one is a leveraged bit, but the mouthpieces are thin and shaped to provide room for her tongue. I may clip my reins to the center ring tomorrow, and see how she responds to it as a snaffle bit.

Also, FWIW, when I first tried this bit, she chomped and fiddled with it. I lowered it a hole, and it was even worse. I tightened it a hole, and things got better. Tightened another hole, and she stopped playing with it other than to sometimes roll the copper roller. So it seems the height in the mouth can also affect how well the horse responds to the bit.
 
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