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Job Ideas

3538 Views 10 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  Foxhunter
So over the last few weeks, I've had a few ideas knocking around in my head and I'd like to get some outside opinions. My grandma loves the main/first idea I had but I think that's mostly cause she has a soft spot for horses and is biased when it comes to me xD Hence why outside thoughts and opinions would be nice.


Idea 1
One of the first ideas/thoughts I had to put it simply, is to buy a horse 2 years old or younger, train it over the year, and sell it for a higher price.
Basically, my whole thought process on this was if I were to buy a cheap(ish) young horse that hadn't had much handling or training yet. Let's say the young horse cost $500. Then, through the year, I work with said young horse and teach it all the ground work and desensitizing that they need and be able to give them a positive start in life with good experiences. Then, once a year has passed (it's debatable how long I'd keep the horse for the training, I'm just saying this as an example for now), sell the horse for a bit of a profit like around $1,500 more or less. That'd cover the initial cost of buying the horse, the hay for the winter, and a bit of a profit as well along with being able to put money aside to repeat this process.

I figured by doing this, not only would I gain more experience with each new horse I take on, but then I can move on to doing more in depth training for starting under saddle and other training that horses need when first learning how to carry a rider. Then take another step forward and get my name out as a trainer and work with other people and their horses. And just keep branching off from there which would also include rescuing and rehabilitating horses that are otherwise meant for slaughter.
I also do know a trainer around here that told me once before that he would be willing to help me out if I ever needed it so I would have help during the learning process of everything if I get stumped with anything.


Idea 2
Try to find some sort of stable related job in my province and gain experience with that. Not really sure where or how that would lead to other things, but you never know what could happen. Though it does mean I'd have to move to be able to do that which I don't mind.


Idea 3
This is more random thoughts that I'm not really sure how to form into a full on plan yet. Thinking about trying to become a bit of a riding instructor, though I'd have a lot of learning to do before I'd do that. But my mare was used as a lesson horse in the past so in that sense, I've got that part covered if I managed to go down that route to a certain degree.
Also have thought about trying to work on a horse ranch or some other job like that. But this is about the end of my ideas and thoughts for the moment.


If you have suggestions of any other horse related job I could try out, I'd definitely love to hear it. Along with any tips on how to get to the point of being able to run my own horse rescue/sanctuary as that's my ultimate dream/goal.
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So, not to rain on your money making plans but....
*1...
There won't be profit if you buy for $500, keep a horse fed, vetted and farrier work done plus account for any time you invest...
Selling for $1500 is only $1000 profit...my horses eat $650 dollars in hay in 3 months of time...one horse.
Farrier is every 5 weeks for mine @ $40 per trim.
Vet approx. $300 for a years worth of vaccinations/teeth/coggins...
You though must have the knowledge, the ability to train and be able to transfer to that horse what you want...
If you seriously think you can buy a young un-handled horse for $500 and turn it around to saleable in less than 6 months as a good riding mount...go for it.
But you won't be buying a youngster like a yearling, but a 2 - 3 year old un-handled is going to be pretty challenging at that age and their size for anyone except very experienced to make good, solid, fast progress with.

*2...
Stable jobs usually start with being a stall-mucker.
If you are good at it, fast and work diligently you can earn decent money...
Once you prove yourself and your knowledge...who knows.
There are opportunities in stable-jobs, but they all involve hard work, filth, no holidays as animals eat 24/7 and regardless of weather conditions or sickness those dedicated...work!
And you must find a stable willing to hire a kid.... :|

*3...
Many riding instructors become that through their barn where they have taken lessons for years.
They show and win on any horse asked to ride...called "catching-a-ride".
They make difficult appear simple and easy.
They make a reputation, then can back it up with results...
In many areas and nations today you must pass testing to be a certified/accredited riding instructor.
Those tests are not just book learning but practical and the higher and better a instructor certification the better a rider you must be to "pass" the practical part of that test.
Many barns today do not hire a trainer/instructor unless "certified/accredited"...:|

If you have not had years of instruction already at this point...you're supposed to be at least 13 years of age to have a account on this forum, so.... :frown_color:
You have a lot of catching up to do...not impossible, but quite a challenge to do for those cushy jobs of riding instructor, catch-rider...
You are coming to the perfect age of a stable-worker though...teenager with a yearning to learn.
Honestly, if I was your grand-parent I would encourage you to get your foot in the door making some $ but more importantly affiliate {work} at a barn where good instruction is available, riders are produced who go to shows and win and horses are well taken care of and healthy.
You can learn much through osmosis...being immersed in the atmosphere you absorb good teachings. You also see and observe how to do it, how not to do it and that helps you when you need to apply it yourself.

However, knowing that unless you are the best-of-the-best, you don't make a very good living doing horses.
Flipping horses is a art and unless you really know horses...can bleed you dry in profitability quickly.
For example...buy a horse cheap...put one month max of riding on it and flip for thousands more than you paid is how sales are done and profits made. The longer you sit on a horse, the less you make profit and if not sold fast chances are you might not break even either.
I don't mean to be negative, but it might be smarter to get your working papers and go work a cash register at the local store or work in McDonald's, Burger King or someplace they hire "kids"...
Barns...sure but be realistic that you will clean stalls, fill water buckets and do hard physical work..you might not even be allowed to feed by yourself with all the medications today animals are dispensed, you need to be really "sharp" about it.
That is the reality of horses and working in barns that I knew about, dealt with daily when I ran/managed them more years ago now than you are alive.
Today, many barns will not hire kids for liability and reliability reasons...so not sure even that will work anymore in your favor.
Consider dog sitting, animal care of pets when owners are away or at work, baby-sitting/childcare after school, house-cleaning, yard-work....
You have good intentions but hard to fulfill those intentions today easily.
Good luck...
just the thoughts from someone whose been around the block a few times already in age and experience.
...
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So, not to rain on your money making plans but....
*1...
There won't be profit if you buy for $500, keep a horse fed, vetted and farrier work done plus account for any time you invest...
Selling for $1500 is only $1000 profit...my horses eat $650 dollars in hay in 3 months of time...one horse.
Farrier is every 5 weeks for mine @ $40 per trim.
Vet approx. $300 for a years worth of vaccinations/teeth/coggins...
You though must have the knowledge, the ability to train and be able to transfer to that horse what you want...
If you seriously think you can buy a young un-handled horse for $500 and turn it around to saleable in less than 6 months as a good riding mount...go for it.
But you won't be buying a youngster like a yearling, but a 2 - 3 year old un-handled is going to be pretty challenging at that age and their size for anyone except very experienced to make good, solid, fast progress with.

*2...
Stable jobs usually start with being a stall-mucker.
If you are good at it, fast and work diligently you can earn decent money...
Once you prove yourself and your knowledge...who knows.
There are opportunities in stable-jobs, but they all involve hard work, filth, no holidays as animals eat 24/7 and regardless of weather conditions or sickness those dedicated...work!
And you must find a stable willing to hire a kid.... :|

*3...
Many riding instructors become that through their barn where they have taken lessons for years.
They show and win on any horse asked to ride...called "catching-a-ride".
They make difficult appear simple and easy.
They make a reputation, then can back it up with results...
In many areas and nations today you must pass testing to be a certified/accredited riding instructor.
Those tests are not just book learning but practical and the higher and better a instructor certification the better a rider you must be to "pass" the practical part of that test.
Many barns today do not hire a trainer/instructor unless "certified/accredited"...:|

If you have not had years of instruction already at this point...you're supposed to be at least 13 years of age to have a account on this forum, so.... :frown_color:
You have a lot of catching up to do...not impossible, but quite a challenge to do for those cushy jobs of riding instructor, catch-rider...
You are coming to the perfect age of a stable-worker though...teenager with a yearning to learn.
Honestly, if I was your grand-parent I would encourage you to get your foot in the door making some $ but more importantly affiliate {work} at a barn where good instruction is available, riders are produced who go to shows and win and horses are well taken care of and healthy.
You can learn much through osmosis...being immersed in the atmosphere you absorb good teachings. You also see and observe how to do it, how not to do it and that helps you when you need to apply it yourself.

However, knowing that unless you are the best-of-the-best, you don't make a very good living doing horses.
Flipping horses is a art and unless you really know horses...can bleed you dry in profitability quickly.
For example...buy a horse cheap...put one month max of riding on it and flip for thousands more than you paid is how sales are done and profits made. The longer you sit on a horse, the less you make profit and if not sold fast chances are you might not break even either.
I don't mean to be negative, but it might be smarter to get your working papers and go work a cash register at the local store or work in McDonald's, Burger King or someplace they hire "kids"...
Barns...sure but be realistic that you will clean stalls, fill water buckets and do hard physical work..you might not even be allowed to feed by yourself with all the medications today animals are dispensed, you need to be really "sharp" about it.
That is the reality of horses and working in barns that I knew about, dealt with daily when I ran/managed them more years ago now than you are alive.
Today, many barns will not hire kids for liability and reliability reasons...so not sure even that will work anymore in your favor.
Consider dog sitting, animal care of pets when owners are away or at work, baby-sitting/childcare after school, house-cleaning, yard-work....
You have good intentions but hard to fulfill those intentions today easily.
Good luck...
just the thoughts from someone whose been around the block a few times already in age and experience.
...

So first off, it appears you think I'm a kid. I'm not sure what would draw your conclusion to that, that I'm actually 21.
As for what you were saying about the first idea I had listed, hay doesn't cost that much for me where I live. Typically hay costs me about half of that for the winter (6-8 months), though with the potential of getting it even a bit cheaper since since one of my uncles makes hay and this last winter he gave me the deal of $2 a bale and that was without me asking for a deal.
I did forget to include vet costs so I will look into that as well. And I didn't say anything about turning it around for a profit in 6 months. I was looking for more like a year simply due to how during the winter there area days, occasionally a week where you can't do anything with horses because of all the snow and ice. So basically, buy the young horse at the end of summer/fall time, then work with it over the winter before selling it in the spring/summer time.
I have worked with difficult horses before as well so I do know how to handle myself decently. But like I mentioned, I also have a trainer around here who's willing to help me in case I get stuck for ideas or just need the extra hand for something.

As for the second idea you commented on, really, the only thing there is I"m not a kid so that's not part of any issue to look for a job with that. Rather I live in such a small town currently where the stables here is so small that they don't any help and there's not really anything that goes on here. So if I were to try to find a stable job, I'd have to move to a different town/city where they would actually need the help and I can gain experience and such and potentially move up from there.

For the rest, I do appreciate your input. Some of which doesn't apply to me though since I'm not a kid and do currently have a job. I'd just like to get more into the equine world which is a bit of a challenge for me due to where I live and never having much for horse related oppertunities growing up since my parent's couldn't afford it and we moved pretty much every 3ish years. So to try to get into it now as an adult is a bit of a challenge other than just owning my own horses. But like I mentioned, I want to run a horse rescue/sanctuary eventually so I'd like to build up my experience in all aspects of the horse world so that I can be as ready and prepared for that as possible.

Thanks for your input though, it's appreciated :)
 

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Since your end goal is to have your own rescue operation, why not find a job or volunteer situation with an existing rescue? It's a unique business, one driven by heart more than profit. Aside from seeing how their horses are processed in and rehabbed, you'll need to learn equine laws, non profit fundraising, attracting and keeping staff and volunteers. It's a huge undertaking so the more experience you can gain, the fewer costly mistakes you might avoid down the line.

As far as your training and flipping goes, the key is to buy low and sell high and cross your fingers no one colics or runs through a fence. The low end market you're talking about is already saturated with home grown horses and owners who are experienced at putting the basics on and doing the flipping themselves. In a market more urban where buyers don't have the time (jobs) or experience to do the basics, they are mostly in a boarding situation and are either looking for an experienced beginner horse or a show horse. To tap into this market you'll need to invest much more time to deliver a beginner mount, or at least one successful showing season (cue the cash register sounds.)
 

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My apologies for making you "younger" than you are..in years to come you might like being thought younger than actual years.:cool:
That "not younger" though can also work very much against you in the horse-world.
I don't know of many truly prosperous adults who are trainers/instructors that started into horses, truly started into a profit-making lifestyle of horses that were not immersed at a considerably younger age.
Sorry.
Your quote for hay prices and the timeline you referred to...
$2.00 a bale x 5 bales minimum a week x 52 weeks = $480.00
Add farrier, add vet...
Do you keep your horses at home or board somewhere? Add $$$$.......
You mention a trainer helping you... add $$$$ cause eventually "free" help does come to a end.
I just can't help but think if you are looking for profit then you need to put a $ value considerably higher and have a marketable product someone is going to want to buy...
Making, then advertising is often done by shows and campaigning, exposure = more $$ spent.
So, based on your own timeline and offered costs your profit just flew the coop.

I honestly would encourage you to find a career where you can be happy in your job and keep horses for your hobby.
Many who do "horses" for a living, unless you have a job that perks board and showing fees rarely have enough free-time and enough extra $$$$ to afford all the things we swallow in horse ownership/keeping costs.
I know many who are real trainers and make a living doing it but they were raised with horses in their blood and were riding, training/breaking stock as children and made a reputation partly from family before them and then them continuing to show they knew their stuff in animals produced who did something besides just looking nice.
Those who are caught in the grunt work of horses...
Well, they make a salary...enough to live the good life, easily affording luxuries and time-off are not also included often or thought of in horses as a lucrative career choice in my mind.
That is not a put-down to anyone but a statement of reality intruding with where I grew up and the cost of horses, their upkeep and training needs...
I know of few instructors/trainers who bring home over $1,000 a week to afford a home, car, horses and incidentals of food, electricity and something called a necessity of health insurance when you have horses and injuries you will have as a "trainer".
I lost my rosy colored glasses many years ago and got real in a hurry when I did work the industry.
When I did work the industry part of my salary was 1 horses board included, but no extras of lessons, training or care the animal needed of farrier/vet.
I worked for private barns of the very wealthy who paid me better than industry standards ever would of.
I worked 6 days a week from 7:00 AM till often 7:00 PM....not giving me much time for my own horse...
Honestly, I sold mine and rode theirs as it was part of my job to prepare and exhibit what the animals could do as they were all sale prospects in the barn...there were 20 horses total for me to care for at my last job...
I know what it cost to buy the green or troubled animal and how much it cost per month to feed and keep them...how much was involved with their training and what the profit margin figured out to be when they sold for various amounts.

Please don't be offended by my first response nor this one...
It is only offered in be aware it isn't as easy as you think to do, nor is it "profitable" like many also think.
The reality is it is hard-work and after working all day long with horses and issues of students, boarders you truly may not find it much "fun" to have to ride, train and school your own prospect needing work to sell and make a $$$ from...for me it just wasn't there.
I was tired after work and not of the mind to want to do it again on my own 5 days a week...

Take my comments as someone who has been where you think you want to be....if heart set on it, go for it.
But go in realizing it takes a lot of $$$$ to afford all of the things we take for granted our parents/family give us along the way.
Suddenly when a adult and wanting to stand on your own, you can't cause you just don't make enough $ to do so....makes you hurt, be sad, burned-out and bitter quickly.
You seem to have many ducks in a row and someone to bank-roll your ambitions and they not cost you if you had to pay hard cash for them...that is great but unrealistic to think they will always be bank-rolled or provided "freely".
Like I said, I lost my rose-colored glasses a long time ago when reality knocked on my door.
And for where I know those really successful now are...the pinnacle of the show-jumping world professionals....they were riding and national champions many of those "names" at 15 years of age and under 17 years of age {called junior riders} that can make a living from their riding.
They do though have a barn full of prospects and assistants home doing the prep work on all those prospects for them and those individuals have no recognition nor fantastic salaries...they just don't.
Go look at who they are, where they came from, what they did and at what age and then look at that compared to you and sadly you see you are at a huge disadvantage if you refer to making a real living doing this...
By the time they were your age these "kids" were Olympic riders and the knowledge they have is from a lifetime of immersed in horses.


Your wanting to do "rescues" is a whole other can to delve into and nut to crack...


Hence my...make horses your hobby you can love and find a career to be happy in you can excel and have more than adequate finances to afford your wanted hobby.
Sorry, my pencil is very sharp on $$ numbers, time constraints and how difficult it is to make it, really make it in the horse world...and my rose glasses were polished clear many years ago.
I wish you the best in your endeavors...
With that I will bow-out as you don't want to hear the reality of my words I think by your original answers and how you wrote them. :bowwdown:

My apologies as you wrote like a younger teen who has dreams...reality is a harsh teacher for many. :wave:
Good luck.

:runninghorse2:...
 

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Coming from someone who wanted to do the same exact thing you're thinking about doing.. I can't say I recommend it. I want to be professional horse trainer someday. My original thoughts were to flip horses, as you said, build up a rapport with those in the area etc. I quickly realized that, at least in my market, that wasn't going to get me anywhere at all. I chose to work under a highly respected trainer in the area which is what I would advise anyone that is wanting to be a trainer, do.

$1500 for a horse you've worked with for a year is nothing. Even 6 months. I'm sure you have experience working and training but it's so much hard work...

If your main goal is to make money, I'd advise getting away from the horses when it comes to finding a job. Seriously. I'd be lying if I said there was no money to be made in the horse industry, but usually it takes years to get to that point. Horses are very expensive. And you know all this, but I was in your shoes a year ago and I'm saying.. really think about it. :lol:

If your main goal is to get experience, I would volunteer with other rescues, trainers, as many respectable equine mentors you can work with. And get money some other way. I know waitresses who work night shifts (4pm-10pm approx) that make really good money. And your mornings would be free to work with horses. Being 21 you could probably work somewhere that sells alcohol, like a roadhouse or something and really make good money.

I guess either way, I'd advise volunteering/interning and making money some other way. That's what I've done. Is it hard? Heck yeah, some days I am exhausted both physically and mentally. But you gotta deal with that kind of stuff till you make it. Nobody has what they have overnight. And it honestly sounds like you have a good head on your shoulders.

P.S. If you still want to take on a project horse.. I would not recommend not to. Just don't do it with the intention of making money. Heck, if you're into rescuing I'd get a project rescue horse and train it to find a new home for it. So like long term fostering. You may even make some good connections that way and/or make a little extra money.
 

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Look for jobs on the peripheral. I had a friend who did all the braiding/mane pulling and clipping for the barn. She made bank, more than enough to pay for her own show fees and add to savings. You have to invest the time to be good at it, and it'll be harder to get started and get enough practice if you aren't at a barn where this service is needed, but it has a much cheaper start up and doesn't rely on luck or availability of opportunities. I have no problem spending $100+ for a good clip job or a good braiding job. Blanket repair is also good. You need to invest in materials and a good industrial sewing machine, though. My blanket repair lady always has stacks of blankets in for repair.

I've done a bit of all 3 of your ideas. I flipped two horses and made a profit on both. Both I got for free, and I worked off the board for both of them for most of the time I had them. You need to be able to pick a quality horse and put quality training on them and hope they stay healthy. The second one I sold after a year for $6500 because I was lucky enough that he was the full package - movement, breeding, mind, and training. But to get that I ended up outsourcing his training for several months to add finesse. I made less of a profit, but still more than I would have if I held on to him longer because his training was lacking. It's not something that I'm eager to pick up again.

Barn chores usually require you to have an 'in' with the barn already unless it's large enough of a barn that they advertise, but you're still getting minimum wage usually. Smaller barns usually can't afford to pay workers, and they can't afford to discount board(someone still has to pay for hay and property taxes). You might be able to trade lessons for board, but you can't feed yourself with that.

To be an instructor you also would need an 'in' or at least good networking skills, along with the riding skills to back it up. There are a lot of terrible instructor who shouldn't be teaching because they can hang up a shingle and have the charisma to keep students. You'd have to decide what side of that problem you want to be on. Just because someone is only planning on doing lower level riding doesn't mean they don't deserve the best instruction they can get. Then are other things to worry about, like insurance, lesson horses, arena fees if you have to use someone else's arena, advertising, getting and retaining students. You can't feed yourself by teaching 2-3 kids once a week.

If you really want to make money teaching and training, you need to apprentice under a successful trainer who is currently doing all those things. Learn from them, apply that knowledge, build a reputation among their clients, get lucky enough to ride their client's horses. Go to shows with them, hope that a client will let you show their horse, win with that horse, then eventually you might be able to hold your own. Though often with these positions, you need to have been riding with the trainer for several years already and 'proven' yourself to them through lessons and chores, or you need to already possess the skills and pass an interview, competing with all the other people who want that spot.

Remember, every other horse crazy girl is trying to do the same thing you are. I did for several years because the only skill I had was horses. I've done the barn chores, showing client horses, working student, starting/training horses. It gets old, fast. After a year or two of waking up at 5, doing turnout and mucking out the barn, riding anywhere from 4-10 horses, then doing turn in and evening chores, I quickly realized I wanted an office job. Lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My apologies for making you "younger" than you are..in years to come you might like being thought younger than actual years.:cool:
That "not younger" though can also work very much against you in the horse-world.
I don't know of many truly prosperous adults who are trainers/instructors that started into horses, truly started into a profit-making lifestyle of horses that were not immersed at a considerably younger age.
Sorry.
Your quote for hay prices and the timeline you referred to...
$2.00 a bale x 5 bales minimum a week x 52 weeks = $480.00
Add farrier, add vet...
Do you keep your horses at home or board somewhere? Add $$$$.......
You mention a trainer helping you... add $$$$ cause eventually "free" help does come to a end.
I just can't help but think if you are looking for profit then you need to put a $ value considerably higher and have a marketable product someone is going to want to buy...
Making, then advertising is often done by shows and campaigning, exposure = more $$ spent.
So, based on your own timeline and offered costs your profit just flew the coop.

I honestly would encourage you to find a career where you can be happy in your job and keep horses for your hobby.
Many who do "horses" for a living, unless you have a job that perks board and showing fees rarely have enough free-time and enough extra $$$$ to afford all the things we swallow in horse ownership/keeping costs.
I know many who are real trainers and make a living doing it but they were raised with horses in their blood and were riding, training/breaking stock as children and made a reputation partly from family before them and then them continuing to show they knew their stuff in animals produced who did something besides just looking nice.
Those who are caught in the grunt work of horses...
Well, they make a salary...enough to live the good life, easily affording luxuries and time-off are not also included often or thought of in horses as a lucrative career choice in my mind.
That is not a put-down to anyone but a statement of reality intruding with where I grew up and the cost of horses, their upkeep and training needs...
I know of few instructors/trainers who bring home over $1,000 a week to afford a home, car, horses and incidentals of food, electricity and something called a necessity of health insurance when you have horses and injuries you will have as a "trainer".
I lost my rosy colored glasses many years ago and got real in a hurry when I did work the industry.
When I did work the industry part of my salary was 1 horses board included, but no extras of lessons, training or care the animal needed of farrier/vet.
I worked for private barns of the very wealthy who paid me better than industry standards ever would of.
I worked 6 days a week from 7:00 AM till often 7:00 PM....not giving me much time for my own horse...
Honestly, I sold mine and rode theirs as it was part of my job to prepare and exhibit what the animals could do as they were all sale prospects in the barn...there were 20 horses total for me to care for at my last job...
I know what it cost to buy the green or troubled animal and how much it cost per month to feed and keep them...how much was involved with their training and what the profit margin figured out to be when they sold for various amounts.

Please don't be offended by my first response nor this one...
It is only offered in be aware it isn't as easy as you think to do, nor is it "profitable" like many also think.
The reality is it is hard-work and after working all day long with horses and issues of students, boarders you truly may not find it much "fun" to have to ride, train and school your own prospect needing work to sell and make a $$$ from...for me it just wasn't there.
I was tired after work and not of the mind to want to do it again on my own 5 days a week...

Take my comments as someone who has been where you think you want to be....if heart set on it, go for it.
But go in realizing it takes a lot of $$$$ to afford all of the things we take for granted our parents/family give us along the way.
Suddenly when a adult and wanting to stand on your own, you can't cause you just don't make enough $ to do so....makes you hurt, be sad, burned-out and bitter quickly.
You seem to have many ducks in a row and someone to bank-roll your ambitions and they not cost you if you had to pay hard cash for them...that is great but unrealistic to think they will always be bank-rolled or provided "freely".
Like I said, I lost my rose-colored glasses a long time ago when reality knocked on my door.
And for where I know those really successful now are...the pinnacle of the show-jumping world professionals....they were riding and national champions many of those "names" at 15 years of age and under 17 years of age {called junior riders} that can make a living from their riding.
They do though have a barn full of prospects and assistants home doing the prep work on all those prospects for them and those individuals have no recognition nor fantastic salaries...they just don't.
Go look at who they are, where they came from, what they did and at what age and then look at that compared to you and sadly you see you are at a huge disadvantage if you refer to making a real living doing this...
By the time they were your age these "kids" were Olympic riders and the knowledge they have is from a lifetime of immersed in horses.


Your wanting to do "rescues" is a whole other can to delve into and nut to crack...


Hence my...make horses your hobby you can love and find a career to be happy in you can excel and have more than adequate finances to afford your wanted hobby.
Sorry, my pencil is very sharp on $$ numbers, time constraints and how difficult it is to make it, really make it in the horse world...and my rose glasses were polished clear many years ago.
I wish you the best in your endeavors...
With that I will bow-out as you don't want to hear the reality of my words I think by your original answers and how you wrote them. :bowwdown:

My apologies as you wrote like a younger teen who has dreams...reality is a harsh teacher for many. :wave:
Good luck.

:runninghorse2:...

I'm sorry if I came off a little bad with my last response, that was not my intent as I really do appreciate you input. Just been dealing with plenty of people earlier in the morning that were tearing me down about my horses so I'm sorry if I ended up taking my frustration out in that response. Did not mean to do that.
And I don't mind you thought I'm younger. Most people do even in real life lol. When I was 13, people thought I was 16. When I was 18, people thought I was 13, and now apparently people think I'm 16-18 lol. Getting kinda used to being seen as younger than I am xD

I do appreciate everything you're saying and it helps me to really think of everything before going ahead and doing something simply because I want to and think about the practical side of it.
I understand what you mean about age being somewhat of a factor with getting into the horse world. I tried my best to be around horses as much as I could growing up, but that was always a challenge and I actually nearly gave up on the dream of even having a horse.
So I know it's going to be an uphill battle to get my foot in the door of the equine world and actually be able to make a profit off of it.
Right now I'm at an advantage with not having to pay board as I'm living on my grandparents property which is a farm so that cuts down on that cost.
There is still plenty more details and things I'd have to iron out before doing that, and definitely keep everything you've said in mind. Thanks.



Coming from someone who wanted to do the same exact thing you're thinking about doing.. I can't say I recommend it. I want to be professional horse trainer someday. My original thoughts were to flip horses, as you said, build up a rapport with those in the area etc. I quickly realized that, at least in my market, that wasn't going to get me anywhere at all. I chose to work under a highly respected trainer in the area which is what I would advise anyone that is wanting to be a trainer, do.

$1500 for a horse you've worked with for a year is nothing. Even 6 months. I'm sure you have experience working and training but it's so much hard work...

If your main goal is to make money, I'd advise getting away from the horses when it comes to finding a job. Seriously. I'd be lying if I said there was no money to be made in the horse industry, but usually it takes years to get to that point. Horses are very expensive. And you know all this, but I was in your shoes a year ago and I'm saying.. really think about it. :lol:

If your main goal is to get experience, I would volunteer with other rescues, trainers, as many respectable equine mentors you can work with. And get money some other way. I know waitresses who work night shifts (4pm-10pm approx) that make really good money. And your mornings would be free to work with horses. Being 21 you could probably work somewhere that sells alcohol, like a roadhouse or something and really make good money.

I guess either way, I'd advise volunteering/interning and making money some other way. That's what I've done. Is it hard? Heck yeah, some days I am exhausted both physically and mentally. But you gotta deal with that kind of stuff till you make it. Nobody has what they have overnight. And it honestly sounds like you have a good head on your shoulders.

P.S. If you still want to take on a project horse.. I would not recommend not to. Just don't do it with the intention of making money. Heck, if you're into rescuing I'd get a project rescue horse and train it to find a new home for it. So like long term fostering. You may even make some good connections that way and/or make a little extra money.
Thanks for the suggestions, I'll definitely keep those in mind.
I'll have to look into the whole fostering thing once I figure out what direction I'm really going to in.



Look for jobs on the peripheral. I had a friend who did all the braiding/mane pulling and clipping for the barn. She made bank, more than enough to pay for her own show fees and add to savings. You have to invest the time to be good at it, and it'll be harder to get started and get enough practice if you aren't at a barn where this service is needed, but it has a much cheaper start up and doesn't rely on luck or availability of opportunities. I have no problem spending $100+ for a good clip job or a good braiding job. Blanket repair is also good. You need to invest in materials and a good industrial sewing machine, though. My blanket repair lady always has stacks of blankets in for repair.

I've done a bit of all 3 of your ideas. I flipped two horses and made a profit on both. Both I got for free, and I worked off the board for both of them for most of the time I had them. You need to be able to pick a quality horse and put quality training on them and hope they stay healthy. The second one I sold after a year for $6500 because I was lucky enough that he was the full package - movement, breeding, mind, and training. But to get that I ended up outsourcing his training for several months to add finesse. I made less of a profit, but still more than I would have if I held on to him longer because his training was lacking. It's not something that I'm eager to pick up again.

Barn chores usually require you to have an 'in' with the barn already unless it's large enough of a barn that they advertise, but you're still getting minimum wage usually. Smaller barns usually can't afford to pay workers, and they can't afford to discount board(someone still has to pay for hay and property taxes). You might be able to trade lessons for board, but you can't feed yourself with that.

To be an instructor you also would need an 'in' or at least good networking skills, along with the riding skills to back it up. There are a lot of terrible instructor who shouldn't be teaching because they can hang up a shingle and have the charisma to keep students. You'd have to decide what side of that problem you want to be on. Just because someone is only planning on doing lower level riding doesn't mean they don't deserve the best instruction they can get. Then are other things to worry about, like insurance, lesson horses, arena fees if you have to use someone else's arena, advertising, getting and retaining students. You can't feed yourself by teaching 2-3 kids once a week.

If you really want to make money teaching and training, you need to apprentice under a successful trainer who is currently doing all those things. Learn from them, apply that knowledge, build a reputation among their clients, get lucky enough to ride their client's horses. Go to shows with them, hope that a client will let you show their horse, win with that horse, then eventually you might be able to hold your own. Though often with these positions, you need to have been riding with the trainer for several years already and 'proven' yourself to them through lessons and chores, or you need to already possess the skills and pass an interview, competing with all the other people who want that spot.

Remember, every other horse crazy girl is trying to do the same thing you are. I did for several years because the only skill I had was horses. I've done the barn chores, showing client horses, working student, starting/training horses. It gets old, fast. After a year or two of waking up at 5, doing turnout and mucking out the barn, riding anywhere from 4-10 horses, then doing turn in and evening chores, I quickly realized I wanted an office job. Lol.
I'll definitely keep what you said in mind, thanks.


It seems pretty much everyone has the same kind of points to make and I appreciate them all.
Some of the stuff you guys mentioned, I've experienced, such has having a horse at the stables to go to tend every day after work. While it's not exactly the same as doing that all day with multiple horses, I at least know the general idea how that part runs. I also find that I forget about being hungry or tired when I go to work with a horse even after a long day of work. Though I imagine it'd be a bit different if I were to work at a stable regularly.

I'll definitely check into apprenticing or something under a trainer as well and also see what is involved with fostering a rescue horse and such. Thanks for input guys :)
 

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Flipping horses can be a good way to actually make money with horses but to do so you need to have a good supply of horses and flip them fast.

With your costing the one thing you are not counting into the factor is your time, that should come into the factor.

Years ago I was doing a lot of horse dealing. I was lucky in that I had a buyer in Eire who sent me over a load of horses. (14) at a time usually. My buyers were other dealers who would be waiting for the horses to arrive.
Horses basically cam eoff one horsebox and onto another. They didn't cost me a penny unless they were eating. Coatings were the price of the horse, travel (£30 a head) and I added £25 for me.

Horses that came into the stables their price had to go up. Generally these were the ones that lost money or just broke even.
 
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