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My husband isn’t like that. He does explain things to me that have me glazed over, so I try to rarely ask mechanical questions. I’m just not interested in mechanical things, and he knows it. If I ask though, he gets excited to explain and I zone out, even if I try and listen! I think it’s often too far over my head. It’s just not something I grasp easily. I’m like, “but yes, why does that work from earlier than that,” and then it’s like I want to know why gasoline is combustible and how that combustion stays so small, and those are questions he just answers with because it does, and I am lost again. lol

It goes both ways though. He’s no good at math. So, he’ll ask me a question and totally regret it. His eyes get that glazed look, I’m all “it’s not hard! You’re over complicating it. Just watch again,” and then he’s like “do you want me to explain how the combustible engine works again,” and I’m like “that’s different! This is simple. Just look!” Then he says “the engine is simple!” We go rounds and I never have been able to teach him a single math concept.

What it comes down to, is I do the math and he fixes the engines. I can grease and service the equipment, fix what I know how to fix, and beyond that it’s up to him.

When it comes to normal things, I think we just rely on each other.

I don’t think I’ve ever been mansplained to myself, but I rarely see people. I also rarely have conversations with other humans. If I have been, it was intentional and looking to get a reaction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #203 ·
I'm not fond of either 'Mansplaining' . . or . . "Mansplaying". Know what I mean?
Yeah, I do. And I can't see your facial expression here. Everyone has the right to set boundaries on what they will and will not engage with. If you're accusing me of "mansplaying" (for which you have reliable form in your PMs to me over the years) you're really off the mark on this one, and a ton of people who know and work with me IRL would beg to disagree with you - always worked with people, always had a lot of feedback, including in my current work, the reviews for which are in the public domain.

It's kind of interesting, because I am having this discussion in various places online and IRL at the moment, and it comes up again and again that a typical retort to women who object to mansplaining and are maintaining their own boundaries and being part of the public discussion about it is that they are "mansplaying" - and then we could get into how women are a part of the misogyny equation, which they are. It's so much easier for some to just work within those parameters.

If it was just an innocent comment, fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #205 ·
OK, @gottatrot - I hope to be wrong on this one. We call that one "manspreading" here. As opposed to "playing the man" - or hectoring others - or riding moral high horses.

Thanks heaps for the clarification. ;) I don't like manspreading either, and I think there's a strong positive correlation between manspreading and mansplaining.

If it was an innocent offhand comment, I apologise, @tinyliny. Prior context suggested it would be naive of me to think that was the only reading.
 

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OK, @gottatrot - I hope to be wrong on this one. We call that one "manspreading" here. As opposed to "playing the man" - or hectoring others - or riding moral high horses.

Thanks heaps for the clarification. ;) I don't like manspreading either, and I think there's a strong positive correlation between manspreading and mansplaining.
DH recently had an appointment with a Physician's Assistant. We were crowded in a very small room with the guy who was wearing extremely tight pants and mansplaying. Both of us had nowhere good to look, so we felt awkward. The guy was soft spoken, had a fancy first name I doubt he was born with so probably gay, but quite the mansplayer/manspreader. He also had quite the manscaping going on (which is our term for extremely groomed hair and beard) LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #207 ·
@gottatrot, have you ever seen the film Labyrinth? With David Bowie in his tights? Honestly, you don't know where to look. I've exchanged notes on that with other music fans, and one hypothesis - you know, when we said, "How could they not be aware of that in the editing suite?" - was that they were very much aware of it, and that probably it was intended to appeal to the mothers of the children watching the movie...well, the ones who are into that kind of thing... o_O

PS: Manscaping - love it! 🤣
 

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Discussion Starter · #208 ·
My husband isn’t like that. He does explain things to me that have me glazed over, so I try to rarely ask mechanical questions.
🤣 With Brett it is nitty-gritty IT stuff which to him is as easy as breathing. Sometimes I have to say, "Whoa, stop right there, I need two cups of coffee first and then you can try to explain it to me slowly - and I still can't guarantee you that I will get it!"


I’m just not interested in mechanical things, and he knows it.
Yeah, I'm voraciously interested in so, so many different subjects - and mechanics isn't one of them...my brain just stalls. Unfortunately Brett feels the same way about that, so we have a lot of expensive outsourcing on our farm, and we don't have your husband or @TrainedByMares for a neighbour that we could perhaps barter labour with...

I feel almost the same negative-numbers lack of interest about accounting, but when we registered a business, someone had to do it, and I have higher pain tolerance than my husband. But honestly, this comedy clip about accounting and dealing with the tax department re business tax is so exactly how I felt in the first two years:


🤣🤣🤣


If I ask though, he gets excited to explain and I zone out, even if I try and listen!
With some subjects, when Brett has to listen to them, he says he will imagine flowers growing out of the heads of the speakers as a coping mechanism, before belatedly extracting himself from the situation... like when he first met my mother...and she monologued him for over an hour while I was somewhere else...:eek:


I think it’s often too far over my head. It’s just not something I grasp easily. I’m like, “but yes, why does that work from earlier than that,” and then it’s like I want to know why gasoline is combustible and how that combustion stays so small, and those are questions he just answers with because it does, and I am lost again. lol
I think apart from giving me tension headaches by default, my comparative lack of understanding of that subject is also honestly through a visceral lack of interest in the subject. Perhaps if my life depended on it - but it's great when people can outsource various things to each other. Brett will outsource the maths and accounting to me, and I never have to do the dishes when he's around (even though I will sneak in and do them when he's not looking at least once a week).


It goes both ways though. He’s no good at math. So, he’ll ask me a question and totally regret it. His eyes get that glazed look, I’m all “it’s not hard! You’re over complicating it. Just watch again,” and then he’s like “do you want me to explain how the combustible engine works again,” and I’m like “that’s different! This is simple. Just look!” Then he says “the engine is simple!” We go rounds and I never have been able to teach him a single math concept.
My husband is like that with maths. He has dyscalculia. The mere confrontation with something like long division or calculating volumes or algebra causes him to get dead-mackarel eyes instantly, and he tells me that it feels like fingers down the blackboard to him inside. He says it's just the worst feeling...😋

So he was going to be a non-starter for doing the business accounting and tax, but he does all of our IT maintenance, software upgrading, ad blocking, debugging etc etc etc.


What it comes down to, is I do the math and he fixes the engines. I can grease and service the equipment, fix what I know how to fix, and beyond that it’s up to him.
That sounds like an excellent arrangement. :)

I don’t think I’ve ever been mansplained to myself, but I rarely see people. I also rarely have conversations with other humans. If I have been, it was intentional and looking to get a reaction.
Well, that's one way to reduce the incidence of mansplaining! ;) (And similar behaviours from women, which can also happen, but not quite at the same rate statistically - I mean, from women it's mostly Dunning-Kruger when they do it, and sometimes just gross toxicity.)

If you want to imagine mansplaining - it's like you go to some city where you take some tiny relative to pony rides while their non-riding father explains to you exactly what you should be doing...(he saw it on the movies / the internet / read it somewhere / a knowledgeable friend told him / his pastor said) ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #209 ·
MEANDERINGS ON MUSIC AND APPRECIATING THE WORK OF OTHERS

Music is one of my favourite things about life, and communication with others, so if I'm gonna journal anywhere, and stick around, this is going to crop up in my discussions, and of course I wouldn't expect anyone not interested to read that. It's just that the interest on that in the group here present has not been zero, so why not, and also because when I do personal journalling, wherever I do it, I do it for my own pleasure and to explore, and it doesn't matter who reads it and who doesn't.

Having said that, I also found when open journalling specifically on music in various places online, that people came out of the woodwork and wrote posts and PMs to tell me that they were happy to find such non-mainstream, thoughtful writing on their favourite music, which didn't engage (except metacognitively, as a phenomenon) in the typical potshots fans will take at each other about what is worthy and what isn't - and which expanded the discussion of music to how it affects your own particular internal world. This is something deeply personal we hear little about, in public writing about music.

I posted a clip yesterday from a band called The Cure who have a ton of music I really love - and I'm very belated appreciator of this music, since this band also had saccharine pop songs when I was growing up that I didn't like, and because at the time Robert Smith's public image was a bit like he was in The Wiggles, or trying to host Playschool. So I had no idea at all what they were doing away from those radio hits which paid the bills - and then in midlife, back in 2014, I discovered an album called Bloodflowers on the iPod Brett was lending me to use as an outdoor work companion when he was working in town during the day. It was the first time in 20 years I had heard an album that grabbed me in the way the best albums could before the age of MP3s, streaming etc. I listened breathlessly from start to finish and then instantly listened again all the way through. I had had no idea that The Cure did very serious, thoughtful music, and that their grasp of the language of music itself, as a way of speaking things you can't express in words, was phenomenal. I also had had no idea that these people were incredibly adept and professional live, and head and shoulders above average in terms of musicianship.


This live clip epitomises to me what I love about this band - I'd previously only seen this kind of musical and interpersonal chemistry and strong sense of team playing when attending concerts from the Australian Chamber Orchestra, and other exceptional groups of classical musicians, or people like Capercaillie, and other technically excellent and high internal rapport folk and traditional bands. There was none of that ego stuff that goes on in a lot of rock bands, it was 100% musicianship and humanity. I love watching their stage performances, and it makes me happy to see human beings anywhere cooperating on something and coming up with things that are beautiful and profound as a result.

Yesterday, after posting that clip, I thought about all the reasons why I love this performance of this song, and that this band is still performing live and making music with most of them now in their 60s - which is not so common in rock / pop music, but normal with classical and folk, which aren't tied to a youth culture in the same way. There's some rock / pop acts who are still around in their 60s and 70s who I think look ridiculous because they're like cases of arrested psychological development combined with accelerated lifestyle-induced physical disintegration - they've never really matured and they're still strutting rock stars - but then I never liked these same bands even when they were young and strutting, either. The ones which I thought had substance tended to also age well and gracefully. Bowie, though I'm not a huge fan of his music myself (I understand that he did important and excellent things, and do like some of his songs, it's just a personal-musical-taste thing), certainly belongs to that category though - and by the way, that's his erstwhile guitarist, Reeves Gabrels, on stage-left (from the audience POV)!

We've watched a lot of Cure concerts together, and Gabrels is a huge personal favourite for Brett, with his cool-cucumber, I'm-just-here-doing-my-thing understatedness and total lack of big-shot-guitarist projections. Simon Gallup on bass, on stage right, is the ultimate stage animal - he does not stop moving around, and we'd love to put a pedometer on him to see how many miles he averages in these concerts that typically go to the three-hour mark or more when it's logistically possible for the band to do it. We also speculate on the kind of toddler he must have been once, and how hard it would have been to keep him out of cupboards. In his spare time he's on his mountainbike - he and drummer Jason Cooper, who does charity triathlons and swims etc, are poster children for the health benefits of exercise. They also would be the two band members using up the most calories during an actual gig.

Keyboardist / incidental instrument player Roger O'Donnell probably gets bored with the light workload he has in some of the songs, and does serious piano/classical and soundtrack CDs on the solo side. If anyone here has ever seen that spoof of Rowan Atkinson playing Chariots of Fire...


🤣 🤣 🤣

...that's also going on with Mr O'Donnell there when he plays in The Cure, especially with their earlier songs, from before when he joined this band as an actual serious professional keyboard player.

Robert Smith and Reeves Gabrels are probably more towards the couch potato end of the spectrum than the drummer and bassist. I don't know their nutritional protocols but I do know that the music industry tends to go with high rates of alcohol consumption and sleep disruption, which former thing Robert Smith referenced in this particular song he wrote in his early 30s:


Anyway, age has not been as kind to either of them physically, but Gabrels doesn't look fazed about it, and Robert Smith has the courage to be who he is no matter what people think - the optics might have changed, but the principle hasn't. He grew up in a conventional suburban environment and started wearing make-up as a teenager, experimenting with borrowed stuff from friends/sister/girlfriend, I can't recall exactly. I do remember that he said that the bullies who tended to chase him around did it more when he wore make-up and this had a reinforcing effect on him. I think it's a great BS filter - if people object to that, you know they're not worth knowing; it saves you time. In recent interviews he's occasionally apologising for wearing stage make-up, for reasons of being pre/post concert or photo shoot etc, and quips that his unconventional wife of over 30 years likes him better that way. This was never about spectacle. It does, from my own observations, give a lot of young people permission to be themselves when their role models are out of the mould and don't conform to social conventions about how people should be because they are male, female, young, old, whatever it is that's tightly circumscribed by society for no very good reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #210 ·
(I can see this is going to be a multi-post article. :) I've got space and am warming to the subject.)

That last post was more about the people, interpersonal stuff, etc. Now I'd like to get into what specifically I love about what they are doing in this clip:


The first thing to comment on there is the staging and presentation - if I'm going to do this chronologically. The first thing you notice when the lights go up is serious teamwork, mutual respect and interconnection - these people are focused on each other and their work, and frequently facing each other, rather than their audience. I don't read that as disrespect for the audience, but respect for each other and what they are trying to do - rather than playing up to being in front of an audience, "look-at-me-up-here" - and as a music appreciator, I actually think this is more respectful to the audience than constantly acknowledging and interacting with and putting on some kind of circus act for the people in the auditorium. It's being conscientious about the quality of the music you're making, and it's upholding the importance of the relationships which are important for putting the performance together. Plenty of space for audience acknowledgement between songs. The ACO and Capercaillie, by the way - some of my favourite classical and folk outfits to see live - are the same, and I love to see the interactions and the chemistry between the people making the music. I love their acknowledgement of each other as well. And apart from that - and I think because of that - their live music is exceptional, in all three examples. It's alive, organic, warm, heartfelt, plus technically of a very high standard.

The looks and nonverbal communication you see between people like this working together in groups to produce something complex they are passionate about are just gold. I'm a big, big fan of connected-up teamwork like this, whether in music, or any other aspect of life. I loved observing moments like this in my own classrooms too - and the best ones I was a student in. I even love seeing it in a herd of horses - the looks they give each other before they all take off in the same direction together like rockets, just for fun, and with this joy in connection and life. ❤

I really appreciate that none of the five men on stage are radiating machismo or toxic masculinity. Simon Gallup may have tattoos and fall most easily into the stereotype of what a rock star looks like, but he's also responsible for the BAD WOLF Dr Who reference on stage (which I won't explain to a non-Who-audience, but watching The Day Of The Doctor would be a good start if anyone is curious).


Furthermore, he might occasionally wear Metallica T-shirts but he also has no compunction about playing a hot pink bass guitar, like at their 40th anniversary concert. Here's the opener of that concert - one of my favourite songs of all time, a real touchpiece for me, that makes me think about and feel all the beautiful and sad things in this world, and is as close to a hymn as non-religious people are going to get (and I don't think the song name is an accident). The bass line on this is so beautiful that I have no words, I can only say that it captures something about being alive that is beyond all words.


Here's an interesting interview excerpt with Robert Smith and Simon Gallup discussing the concept of success in their late 40s. (And neither of them are mansplaining, or manspreading! ;))


They've got another album in the works that's probably going to be out later this year (but good things take time ;)). I'm very much looking forward to it. These people are clearsighted in many ways and I'd be willing to bet that they don't have their heads in the sand about what it's been like to live in this world since their last album release in 2008. It will be the first album release since I counted myself as a serious appreciator of what they do - and I've only spent several years exploring and journalling elsewhere about their back catalogue, and still haven't finished! ;)

I'm not quite done yet. I've got another post to go specifically on singing...
 

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Discussion Starter · #211 ·

Here we go again - same clip, because I'm still talking about that same clip. I want to draw attention to the singing. If anyone here has rather conventional tastes in music, you might have gotten to the opening vocalisation in the song and gone, "OK, that's not for me!" But if you were to push beyond that, you'd find that Robert Smith is an excellent singer technically. Just look at how he repeats the "always wrong" part of the chorus - with a different emphasis every time, and softly on the third repeat. This is how you're taught to play violin - altering your phrases as you repeat them - legato, staccato, spiccato, etc - changing the tone of your strings, your bowing of the same notes; using different effects, playing loudly and then repeating softly, or playing fast then repeating slow, etc etc etc. This was the thing that made me passionate about practicing as a string student, before we built our own house and had a smallholding. To know how much accomplishment is in something like this really made me listen better and appreciate music so much more when other people performed it.

Even the fact that Robert Smith can do non-verbal vocalisations like that, and replicate them quite reliably instead of all over the shop is exceptional, unless you've had opera training like Kate Miller-Heidke. Bono certainly can't do it, not from what I've seen - e.g. Pride (In The Name Of Love) live; many rock / pop artists leave a lot to be desired when it comes to their onstage singing. With this singer, though, he seems to have put so much work into it over his life that he just got better and better. So now, even when he's performing old things I didn't like as studio songs way back, I really like the way he sings that these days, and the way everyone's playing has pulled together to this total apex of professionalism live.

This is from someone who actually didn't like his voice very much when I was growing up in the 80s - back then it was rather nasal and whiny. So when I discovered Bloodflowers on my husband's iPod back in 2014, one of the things that amazed me was that Robert Smith could really, really sing. And write thoughtful lyrics. And the band could play. That part I was aware of from the first Cure song that ever got my complete attention, even though it was a radio song - Lullaby, which came out when I was an undergraduate and way too impoverished to be buying full-price CDs - so I started an excursion into classical and folk at the time, which was so much more affordable. I didn't get to buy a whole lot of musical things that I thought were interesting back then - I relied on the radio stations to play them again for me.

Here's Lullaby:


This is just excellently constructed, and humorous to me in its high dramatisation of a child's nightmare, sung by an adult. I know, my humour is strange, but this always made me smile at the same time as I found it convincingly creepy, as well as musically beautiful. There is no one way to respond to something like this. But every time this was on the radio, I'd stop everything and sit down crosslegged with my eyes closed and just listen and enjoy this song, when I was a university student.

So this should have given me some clue, but you know how they say, One swallow does not make a summer - or if you're German, Even a blind chicken will accidentally happen upon a piece of grain - and I'd heard too many saccharine pop songs at that point from them, so it was down to what I was exposed to on the radio, or even by my age contemporaries - because the classmate who played songs of their 1987 album in our English class as part of music project did not play any of the really interesting songs off that - just the candyfloss songs! But if she'd played this, I'd have saved up and bought the album:


...that's breathtaking on all sorts of levels. It just doesn't get better than this, to me.

Or this...


And now I will restrain myself, and end this entry - this is an endless topic, but I do have other things I must do... and this will go on my music blog, to be continued. :p

Why I love music like this is that it shows me what life is like when there is humanity in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #213 ·
I said it was called manspreading, @tinyliny. And it's not like there weren't past precedents to that interpretation.
 

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MEANDERINGS ON MUSIC AND APPRECIATING THE WORK OF OTHERS

Music is one of my favourite things about life, and communication with others, so if I'm gonna journal anywhere, and stick around, this is going to crop up in my discussions, and of course I wouldn't expect anyone not interested to read that. It's just that the interest on that in the group here present has not been zero, so why not, and also because when I do personal journalling, wherever I do it, I do it for my own pleasure and to explore, and it doesn't matter who reads it and who doesn't.

Having said that, I also found when open journalling specifically on music in various places online, that people came out of the woodwork and wrote posts and PMs to tell me that they were happy to find such non-mainstream, thoughtful writing on their favourite music, which didn't engage (except metacognitively, as a phenomenon) in the typical potshots fans will take at each other about what is worthy and what isn't - and which expanded the discussion of music to how it affects your own particular internal world. This is something deeply personal we hear little about, in public writing about music.

I posted a clip yesterday from a band called The Cure who have a ton of music I really love - and I'm very belated appreciator of this music, since this band also had saccharine pop songs when I was growing up that I didn't like, and because at the time Robert Smith's public image was a bit like he was in The Wiggles, or trying to host Playschool. So I had no idea at all what they were doing away from those radio hits which paid the bills - and then in midlife, back in 2014, I discovered an album called Bloodflowers on the iPod Brett was lending me to use as an outdoor work companion when he was working in town during the day. It was the first time in 20 years I had heard an album that grabbed me in the way the best albums could before the age of MP3s, streaming etc. I listened breathlessly from start to finish and then instantly listened again all the way through. I had had no idea that The Cure did very serious, thoughtful music, and that their grasp of the language of music itself, as a way of speaking things you can't express in words, was phenomenal. I also had had no idea that these people were incredibly adept and professional live, and head and shoulders above average in terms of musicianship.


This live clip epitomises to me what I love about this band - I'd previously only seen this kind of musical and interpersonal chemistry and strong sense of team playing when attending concerts from the Australian Chamber Orchestra, and other exceptional groups of classical musicians, or people like Capercaillie, and other technically excellent and high internal rapport folk and traditional bands. There was none of that ego stuff that goes on in a lot of rock bands, it was 100% musicianship and humanity. I love watching their stage performances, and it makes me happy to see human beings anywhere cooperating on something and coming up with things that are beautiful and profound as a result.

Yesterday, after posting that clip, I thought about all the reasons why I love this performance of this song, and that this band is still performing live and making music with most of them now in their 60s - which is not so common in rock / pop music, but normal with classical and folk, which aren't tied to a youth culture in the same way. There's some rock / pop acts who are still around in their 60s and 70s who I think look ridiculous because they're like cases of arrested psychological development combined with accelerated lifestyle-induced physical disintegration - they've never really matured and they're still strutting rock stars - but then I never liked these same bands even when they were young and strutting, either. The ones which I thought had substance tended to also age well and gracefully. Bowie, though I'm not a huge fan of his music myself (I understand that he did important and excellent things, and do like some of his songs, it's just a personal-musical-taste thing), certainly belongs to that category though - and by the way, that's his erstwhile guitarist, Reeves Gabrels, on stage-left (from the audience POV)!

We've watched a lot of Cure concerts together, and Gabrels is a huge personal favourite for Brett, with his cool-cucumber, I'm-just-here-doing-my-thing understatedness and total lack of big-shot-guitarist projections. Simon Gallup on bass, on stage right, is the ultimate stage animal - he does not stop moving around, and we'd love to put a pedometer on him to see how many miles he averages in these concerts that typically go to the three-hour mark or more when it's logistically possible for the band to do it. We also speculate on the kind of toddler he must have been once, and how hard it would have been to keep him out of cupboards. In his spare time he's on his mountainbike - he and drummer Jason Cooper, who does charity triathlons and swims etc, are poster children for the health benefits of exercise. They also would be the two band members using up the most calories during an actual gig.

Keyboardist / incidental instrument player Roger O'Donnell probably gets bored with the light workload he has in some of the songs, and does serious piano/classical and soundtrack CDs on the solo side. If anyone here has ever seen that spoof of Rowan Atkinson playing Chariots of Fire...


🤣 🤣 🤣

...that's also going on with Mr O'Donnell there when he plays in The Cure, especially with their earlier songs, from before when he joined this band as an actual serious professional keyboard player.

Robert Smith and Reeves Gabrels are probably more towards the couch potato end of the spectrum than the drummer and bassist. I don't know their nutritional protocols but I do know that the music industry tends to go with high rates of alcohol consumption and sleep disruption, which former thing Robert Smith referenced in this particular song he wrote in his early 30s:


Anyway, age has not been as kind to either of them physically, but Gabrels doesn't look fazed about it, and Robert Smith has the courage to be who he is no matter what people think - the optics might have changed, but the principle hasn't. He grew up in a conventional suburban environment and started wearing make-up as a teenager, experimenting with borrowed stuff from friends/sister/girlfriend, I can't recall exactly. I do remember that he said that the bullies who tended to chase him around did it more when he wore make-up and this had a reinforcing effect on him. I think it's a great BS filter - if people object to that, you know they're not worth knowing; it saves you time. In recent interviews he's occasionally apologising for wearing stage make-up, for reasons of being pre/post concert or photo shoot etc, and quips that his unconventional wife of over 30 years likes him better that way. This was never about spectacle. It does, from my own observations, give a lot of young people permission to be themselves when their role models are out of the mould and don't conform to social conventions about how people should be because they are male, female, young, old, whatever it is that's tightly circumscribed by society for no very good reasons.
The Cure has been my favorite band since the 80's. I was lucky enough to have had a good friend who was into goth industrial music and he introduced me to their older stuff. Charlotte Sometimes captivated my interest and I have been a total fan of them since. I've been fortunate to see them live a half dozen times throughout the years. Thank you for such a beautiful description of your journey of Cure discovery and deep dive into the essence of what they have done. A few songs aside, Bloodflowers was the last "real" Cure album IMO; cannot wait for the next one (which was promised in 2019!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #215 ·
Thank goodness - I wasn't shouting into a void! ;)

How lovely that you dropped in, @bornabadfish. ❤ Hello.

Brett tends to agree with you re Bloodflowers, but I've quite taken to their self-titled, and I think the worst thing about their 2008 album (apart from a couple of songs I really didn't like) was the mastering/mixing/whatever the Dickens it was that made it sound like it comes from a tinny radio at the bottom of a well, or an overcompressed MP-3 - my ears were screaming at that. A re-master would be good and I hate the Loudness Wars. And it's a good thing they are taking so long finalising all that stuff on the new album...

So now we need to know more about you, of course! :)
 

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Thank goodness - I wasn't shouting into a void! ;)

How lovely that you dropped in, @bornabadfish. ❤ Hello.

Brett tends to agree with you re Bloodflowers, but I've quite taken to their self-titled, and I think the worst thing about their 2008 album (apart from a couple of songs I really didn't like) was the mastering/mixing/whatever the Dickens it was that made it sound like it comes from a tinny radio at the bottom of a well, or an overcompressed MP-3 - my ears were screaming at that. A re-master would be good and I hate the Loudness Wars. And it's a good thing they are taking so long finalising all that stuff on the new album...

So now we need to know more about you, of course! :)
Funny to find myself chatting on a forum about horses, of which I know almost nothing about. I actually stumbled upon this thread because of r/TheCure sub on Reddit. https://www.reddit.com/r/TheCure/comments/w7sl12 .
 

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Discussion Starter · #217 · (Edited)
Well, there you go. And what would you like to know about horses? ;)



(This is a horse.)

So that's the problem when you do music journalling in an unexpected place... but I seriously never expected anyone to join a forum just to say hello! 😄
 

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The Cure has been my favorite band since the 80's. I was lucky enough to have had a good friend who was into goth industrial music and he introduced me to their older stuff. Charlotte Sometimes captivated my interest and I have been a total fan of them since. I've been fortunate to see them live a half dozen times throughout the years. Thank you for such a beautiful description of your journey of Cure discovery and deep dive into the essence of what they have done. A few songs aside, Bloodflowers was the last "real" Cure album IMO; cannot wait for the next one (which was promised in 2019!)
Well, there you go. And what would you like to know about horses? ;)



(This is a horse.)

So that's the problem when you do music journalling in an unexpected place... but I seriously never expected anyone to join a forum just to say hello! 😄
I'm quite happy watching horses on Yellowstone and 1883 these days lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #219 ·
I'm quite happy watching horses on Yellowstone and 1883 these days lol.
Well, if you ever wish to be filled up on things horse, there are a few people here who will be very happy to oblige. ;)

How hilarious and sweet that a person signed up to HF just to say hello about the music journalling on The Cure. ❤ I am married to Mr Internet with a Reddit account, so every time I've written anything anywhere that niche Cure fans might enjoy it's been indexed there for anyone interested. And there's been readers and feedback on Reddit and on Curefans, but nobody from Reddit had ever tried to leave a comment on the source pages (music forum, blog) before this. Hahahaha. 😁

You actually don't have to talk about horses to us if you don't want to. This is a journal section, where other interests can be discussed (with a few exceptions, like recreational axe murdering). You've landed in the most other-interests journal here, although I can justify my existence on these pages by the fact that I am actually documenting saddle educating a horse called Julian, and that I am very fond of some of the people here and have been a long time.

This is Julian (and donkey Nelly, who's besotted by him):


And this is a photoshop job Brett did to place Simon Gallup near some Texas Longhorns as part of a COVID education push:

Social Distancing with Simon

Are you fed up with the people who aren't taking this pandemic seriously, and who don't care if they spread their germs all over you? Let Simon help you with social distancing.



Option 1: A Texas Longhorn cow is a valuable aid to social distancing. Horn spans frequently exceed 2 metres. If you take one of these on your walks around town or country, nobody is going to barge into you, or come within coughing distance of where you are breathing. And while Texas Longhorns are not a dairy breed, they can easily supply enough milk for your household on top of raising their own calf, reducing the necessity for shopping trips into potentially virus-laden indoors spaces.

Option 2: If you live in an apartment, you may not have the space for a Texas Longhorn cow, so why not buy a specially made, completely solid replica bass guitar in signature pink. While you can't play music on it, it still looks pretty cool, and has been especially designed for standing up to repeated impacts if necessary. Replica bass guitar plus average arm length exceeds 2 metres, so if you spin around holding it by the tuning peg end, you should be able to maintain the currently recommended social distancing space around you (or clear a sufficient space if necessary).
 
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