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Well, if you ever wish to be filled up on things horse, there are a few people here who will be very happy to oblige. ;)

How hilarious and sweet that a person signed up to HF just to say hello about the music journalling on The Cure. ❤ I am married to Mr Internet with a Reddit account, so every time I've written anything anywhere that niche Cure fans might enjoy it's been indexed there for anyone interested. And there's been readers and feedback on Reddit and on Curefans, but nobody from Reddit had ever tried to leave a comment on the source pages (music forum, blog) before this. Hahahaha. 😁

You actually don't have to talk about horses to us if you don't want to. This is a journal section, where other interests can be discussed (with a few exceptions, like recreational axe murdering). You've landed in the most other-interests journal here, although I can justify my existence on these pages by the fact that I am actually documenting saddle educating a horse called Julian, and that I am very fond of some of the people here and have been a long time.

This is Julian (and donkey Nelly, who's besotted by him):


And this is a photoshop job Brett did to place Simon Gallup near some Texas Longhorns as part of a COVID education push:

Social Distancing with Simon

Are you fed up with the people who aren't taking this pandemic seriously, and who don't care if they spread their germs all over you? Let Simon help you with social distancing.



Option 1: A Texas Longhorn cow is a valuable aid to social distancing. Horn spans frequently exceed 2 metres. If you take one of these on your walks around town or country, nobody is going to barge into you, or come within coughing distance of where you are breathing. And while Texas Longhorns are not a dairy breed, they can easily supply enough milk for your household on top of raising their own calf, reducing the necessity for shopping trips into potentially virus-laden indoors spaces.

Option 2: If you live in an apartment, you may not have the space for a Texas Longhorn cow, so why not buy a specially made, completely solid replica bass guitar in signature pink. While you can't play music on it, it still looks pretty cool, and has been especially designed for standing up to repeated impacts if necessary. Replica bass guitar plus average arm length exceeds 2 metres, so if you spin around holding it by the tuning peg end, you should be able to maintain the currently recommended social distancing space around you (or clear a sufficient space if necessary).
Oh my this is all hilarious and amazing. "Social Distancing with Simon G" YouTube channel, now I'd watch that!!!
I'm one of those kind of people who will sign up for a forum just to comment on anything Cure. How fun to make new friends near and far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #222 · (Edited)
Hahaha, @bornabadfish, I'd watch that too! You can just imagine him walking around with that Texas Longhorn on the lead rope in a pedestrian mall, scowling at inconsiderate people who don't respect other people's personal distance. The Texas Longhorn would be a multi-purpose solution for him - he would be far less likely to be bothered for autographs when trying to do his shopping etc. It really is a most useful and decorative bovine breed. 😎

The reason the Photoshop job is quite convincing is that Brett happened to find a photo of Mr Gallup leaning up against his mountain bike for some cycling magazine, so it was easy to fandangle him off that page and into the field, leaning up against the cow. 😇 He came with his bass, so we had to think about how to encorporate that into our health promotion message. 🤣 I was asked to draw a realistic lead rope arc with a mouse (so hard compared to an actual pencil, a number of curse-undo moments) and then Brett magicked it into braided form. He added a few shadows in the right places and did some blurring, and transplanting of grass. Also - and extreme Cure heads might notice this, and Simon Gallup certainly would - as it wasn't his pink bass, a quick colour-switch was performed just to make the whole thing more punchy.

By the way, re those Cure appreciation posts, it has since been pointed out to me by my husband that he's never seen Simon Gallup wearing a Metallica T-shirt, might I mean Iron Maiden, and by the way, they are also British? Yes, it was someone like that - someone noisy, and interchangeable to the amateur... 😜 These are first drafts, and I'll fix a few inaccuracies and re-word a few things more elegantly when they go on my main online open journal/blog (to be continued). So if anyone notices anything amiss, please let me know.

@bornabadfish, how cool that you go around checking into various online places just to connect up with other Cure afficionados! 😎 You're certainly welcome here if you can put up with the strong livestock smells and my-little-ponying. And you know what, if you feel like it, come by and drop a favourite Cure song or favourite live clip into my journal and tell us why you love it in fine detail, and of course any aspect you don't too, if applicable. It will make this thread more alive and I will enjoy reading, and replying. :)

Something we found yesterday that was interesting - the Aeolian scale bit, not the how-to-be-a-copycat - feel free to chime in reactions, comments, agree/disagree etc. And welcome again!

 

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The Cure has been my favorite band since the 80's. I was lucky enough to have had a good friend who was into goth industrial music and he introduced me to their older stuff. Charlotte Sometimes captivated my interest and I have been a total fan of them since. I've been fortunate to see them live a half dozen times throughout the years. Thank you for such a beautiful description of your journey of Cure discovery and deep dive into the essence of what they have done. A few songs aside, Bloodflowers was the last "real" Cure album IMO; cannot wait for the next one (which was promised in 2019!)
Hahaha, @bornabadfish, I'd watch that too! You can just imagine him walking around with that Texas Longhorn on the lead rope in a pedestrian mall, scowling at inconsiderate people who don't respect other people's personal distance. The Texas Longhorn would be a multi-purpose solution for him - he would be far less likely to be bothered for autographs when trying to do his shopping etc. It really is a most useful and decorative bovine breed. 😎

The reason the Photoshop job is quite convincing is that Brett happened to find a photo of Mr Gallup leaning up against his mountain bike for some cycling magazine, so it was easy to fandangle him off that page and into the field, leaning up against the cow. 😇 He came with his bass, so we had to think about how to encorporate that into our health promotion message. 🤣 I was asked to draw a realistic lead rope arc with a mouse (so hard compared to an actual pencil, a number of curse-undo moments) and then Brett magicked it into braided form. He added a few shadows in the right places and did some blurring, and transplanting of grass. Also - and extreme Cure heads might notice this, and Simon Gallup certainly would - as it wasn't his pink bass, a quick colour-switch was performed just to make the whole thing more punchy.

By the way, re those Cure appreciation posts, it has since been pointed out to me by my husband that he's never seen Simon Gallup wearing a Metallica T-shirt, might I mean Iron Maiden, and by the way, they are also British? Yes, it was someone like that - someone noisy, and interchangeable to the amateur... 😜 These are first drafts, and I'll fix a few inaccuracies and re-word a few things more elegantly when they go on my main online open journal/blog (to be continued). So if anyone notices anything amiss, please let me know.

@bornabadfish, how cool that you go around checking into various online places just to connect up with other Cure afficionados! 😎 You're certainly welcome here if you can put up with the strong livestock smells and my-little-ponying. And you know what, if you feel like it, come by and drop a favourite Cure song or favourite live clip into my journal and tell us why you love it in fine detail, and of course any aspect you don't too, if applicable. It will make this thread more alive and I will enjoy reading, and replying. :)

Something we found yesterday that was interesting - the Aeolian scale bit, not the how-to-be-a-copycat - feel free to chime in reactions, comments, agree/disagree etc. And welcome again!

You are my favorite piece of the internet today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #224 ·
PRIZE PUMPKIN

Presenting our largest pumpkin from this year's harvest - a Musquee de Provence...






I've been cutting it into wedges and roasting them in the oven all night - then the wedges will get packed and put in the freezer for later ready use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #226 ·
this looks like Brett is casting a spell, perhaps making the pumpkin appear:
View attachment 1132769
and then , by magic, his head is floating next to it:
View attachment 1132770
Haha! 😄 We had two pumpkins off that vine (it was a poor season for cucurbits, too cold) - the other is really small, and still outside on the bench because it is unblemished and therefore doesn't need emergency processing to stop it spoiling. And after we took these photos, Brett said, "I should have made that gesture over the small pumpkin and then changed pumpkins to take a ta-da - look, I made it bigger photo. Too late now!"

But my husband really does make a lot of magic at our house! 🖤
 

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Discussion Starter · #227 ·
You are my favorite piece of the internet today.
That solo lockdown dance party was a cool thing to do - maybe you should share it with everyone by posting it to this thread. We have a few people here who live isolated and could do with some new-ways-to-exercise inspiration. Also with some yoga tips! :D

Having dry ice was particularly fun. So because you did the first album, I will post the recent live versions of songs I have grown to love off that. ;)



These days they play that 70s material with such panache!
 

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Discussion Starter · #228 ·
A few things about the owner-building of our strawbale house on Red Moon Sanctuary.
Plant Property Building Door Fixture

Newspaper Font Publication Building Slope

Property Sky Building Slope Newspaper

Schematic Rectangle Font Material property Parallel

Plant Property Tree Sky Building

Newspaper Line Wood Font Adaptation

Photograph Human Sleeve Adaptation Collage

Font Line Publication Newspaper Building

Sky Property Plant Building Window


Questions always welcome - also we have a photo album of the build with annotated photos (in individual photo mode) which we've long made available to the Australian and international communities as a strawbale building and owner-building resource. ♥
 

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Discussion Starter · #230 ·
It's funny, we're on a bit of a nostalgia drive at the moment over the last decade and how it changed the place we've adopted and us. We're resting on our laurels a bit looking back and consciously celebrating what we've achieved, to gather energy to finish the attic flooring, balcony etc and do the other main projects like the re-fence and loading ramp that must be done this year...

The weather is too miserable to ride - horses are in rugs, and Brett is ill thanks to his trip to the city and the fact that families are, well, families and sense and courtesy can go out the door - so he's taking it easy and watching movies etc, and because we're not hiking but on a precious fortnight of annual leave, I'm having a look in the rear vision mirror.

Posting the building articles above made me think about the months we spent in the caravan en route to living in our house.


CARAVAN DAYS 2012/2013

As part and parcel of owner-building our strawbale house, we spent four months living on-site in a caravan. That summer is now nearly a decade in the past, and I’d like to commemorate that time. This is the original manuscript of the article published in Australia's Grass Roots 251 in Feb/March 2019.

Life in a small interior

If you are building your own abode in the country, you may find it convenient to spend some time living in a caravan while getting the house habitable. It is generally not a good idea to ask your council for permission – it’s rather pointless, as councils around Australia are increasingly taking the view that the only place they want people in caravans is where at least $30 per night will be charged for the privilege. This is not compatible either with most owner-builder budgets (nor practical, since the whole point is to be on-site), or, to my way of thinking, with the civil liberties of private landholders wishing to peacefully enjoy their own properties. Australia is fast legislating the fair go out of existence on many fronts.

Friendly donkeys were part and parcel of the experience

Many people still do use caravans or other temporary accommodation to live on-site during house construction, and if you can quietly swing it, it’s a good way to save money and time while engaged in a project that is notoriously demanding on both.

We weren’t going to do it, initially – we commuted from town every building day, half an hour each way, when we started our house, determined to go from one functional house to the next. But when a few curveballs were thrown our way in the middle of it all – a traffic accident that aggravated a back injury and resulted in down time, consequent delays in building, and a building site burglary – we gratefully accepted the loan of a caravan, and spent one summer living in it while getting our house from lock-up stage to the point where we could sleep in the house.

Donkey-vision

We look back on that summer six years ago with a fond nostalgia. It felt oddly like we were pioneering – washing ourselves in buckets by the rainwater tank, washing up similarly after cooking in the caravan, sleeping at night with the mopokes calling in the trees and the donkeys swaying our bed by scratching themselves against the caravan axle. Our generator ran our power tools and also my trusty twin tub washing machine, and washing was hung on the espalier wires of our embryonic orchard.

First use of twin tub, directly by the tank and run off a generator extension cord


First wash day on our farm – clothes hung off espalier wires

Organising Storage

We had a small household’s worth of furniture and general contents that needed a home before we could distribute it around the finished house later. A commercial storage unit was contemplated, but was another expense we didn’t need, and we worried about rodent, insect and moisture damage to our extensive book collection.

At lock-up, our house had all the ceilings installed, the wet areas plasterboarded and primed, a scratch coat on all the strawbale walls internally, and two plaster coats on the exterior – i.e. sealed and weatherproof. We now needed to complete the interior plasterboarding and lime plastering, seal the floors, tile the wet areas, and install the fixtures of two bathrooms and a kitchen. Also on the list was internal door hanging and painting, installing architraves and skirting boards, and making built-in cupboards and shelving.
Plasterboard installation

We decided to use one unfinished bedroom as a furniture store, and another to store boxes of books and household effects. The boxes were stacked as an island in the middle of the room, surrounded by rodent bait stations as we are rural and there were still some gaps in the house. We regularly inspected the book boxes to ensure nothing was nibbling at Charles Dickens and his friends.
Unfinished room for temporary storage

Portable Pantry

Without a kitchen, we needed a portable, rodent-and-insect-safe pantry in which to store our cooking staples, and used several lidded plastic storage tubs for this purpose. For space reasons, we kept these at the house and had just one small tub with immediate meal requirements in the caravan, which we took “shopping” to the house tubs as needed.

Items requiring refrigeration lived in the small caravan fridge. There was also some fresh produce coming from our newly planted food garden.

Temporary Wardrobe

Casual clothes for immediate use were kept in the caravan wardrobe, while all our other clothes resided in suitcases in the “ultra clean area” – a completely plasterboarded and painted bathroom – along with kitchen equipment that didn’t fit in the caravan but was sometimes needed, stationery, paperwork etc.

Living In A Small Space

Our loan caravan was a small two-person model, with a double bed at one end, a padded seating bench across the other end, and an area in the middle with a small wardrobe on one side and a kitchenette opposite. The bed doubled as a space for daytime reading and using our laptops. The plastic tub with immediate supplies had to be kept on one side of the seating bench, as there was no other space for it. Dishes were put into a plastic washtub, which was ferried out to the tank for washing up. Clean dishes then went into another plastic tub.

Brett relaxing with a cup of tea

In a small space, you have to be very tidy and organised not to go crazy – everything has to have its spot, and return to that spot. Once a week we vacuumed the caravan, running a power cable from the generator. We like living in a clean space, and this made us feel more at home.

Christmas 2012, with festive decorations and reading material

Breakfasts were fun. We usually had muesli and fruit, and the donkeys would appear the moment we opened the caravan door while breakfasting, and push enquiring heads through the doorway. They were interested not just in the apple cores, but also the mandarin and banana peels, and gave little hoots to encourage us to find such items for them.


Office In A Shed

After Brett’s long-service leave was over, we had to set up an office for him so he could resume his graphic design work, which he did from home for his Melbourne employer. At this stage the off-grid solar-electric system had been installed in the shed, but the house was not yet live. We set up his office space in the shed, conveniently out of the way of house-finishing activities. We had a power cable to the main house and could now enjoy listening to music while working inside the house.


How Caravan Living Ended

As summer gave way to autumn, mice decided that the caravan was a nice spot to colonise. The caravan was not mouse-proof, and baiting/trapping had only limited success. I’m a light sleeper, and at night I could hear mice scrabbling inside the skin of the caravan walls. When one mouse started moving into our wardrobe, and bouncing around in it night after night like a miniature poltergeist, that was the end of a good night’s sleep for me. Also, the caravan interior was getting very cold at night with autumn descending. At this point we were yearning to sleep in our nice, warm, soft Queen-sized bed again – a bed the donkeys couldn’t rattle in the middle of the night. The home office was habitable now, so we decided to use it as temporary sleeping quarters while finishing the actual bedrooms.

The office had its scratch coat on when we decided it was more comfortable temporary accommodation than the caravan

Aerial Shot of Brett in Completed Office – Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
Finished office, later on

Master Bedroom II – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
The actual finished bedroom

The caravan continued its duties as a kitchen until the house kitchen was installed (GR 219/220). The donkeys continued to visit whenever there was actual cooking. When there were no suitable fruit and vegetable scraps for them, we gave them a Weet-Bix each. For some reason, the dominant memory of our caravan days is that of three donkey faces poking into the caravan doorway inquisitively, looking for snacks and entertainment.
The Three Stooges? – Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond, Western Australia
Who can resist those three?

Should You Do It?

Regardless of what authorities think about the matter, living on-site when owner building results in significant savings of money, time and energy compared to continuing to live off-site and having to commute in. It is a commonsense thing to do, and becomes an adventure in improvisation you will remember for the rest of your life.

Work on the living area – now with music

North Wall of Open Living Area – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
Finished living area
View East Through Dining AreaWindow – Completed Strawbale House Build in Redmond Western Australia
They still know where we live…
Donkey Perspectives - Red Moon Sanctuary, Redmond Western Australia
Donkeys = antics
 

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Discussion Starter · #231 ·
The weather is still too miserable to ride - gale-force winds, intermittent driving rain. We can't hike because Brett is still unwell - why does this always happen when we're on annual leave? We were so looking forward to this time off, and being outdoors, and now we're indoors doing indoors things (except when I do basic animal and garden care). Ah well. I suppose couch potato down time also counts as down time.

This post is for anyone living on a smallholding who can't remember the last time they went on holidays away. We were supposed to do two weeks hiking in Tasmania by campervan back in 2019, but we all know what happened that year. So we've now not been out of our home state for 12 years. But we love where we love - the South Coast of Western Australia is one of the greatest places to be when that happens - plenty of hiking trails here, including hundreds of kilometres we've not yet walked. So we're wilderness walking on day trips, which I record on a hiking diary for people in other places to have vicarious journeys in. This is currently being appreciated on a site called Remote Places, where people exchange such material.

But anyway, today is the day to look back at one of our favourite hiking holidays in the fabled Tasmania, across the Nullarbor and Bass Strait from us, a spectacular wilderness state...and it's a vicarious trip for anyone who's not been there, or been out a while. Enjoy! :D

TASMANIA BY CAMPERVAN, EASTER 2009

We were looking forward to finally making another trip to Tasmania in 2019, for the first time in ten years…having meanwhile bought a farm, built a shed and outbuildings and farmhouse with our own hands, planted thousands of trees, looked after animals, planted an orchard and permaculture garden, etc etc. Oh well. But in celebration of that, here is a version with extras of an article on a past trip that was originally published by Grass Roots 247 in June/July 2018.


Tasmania is a real jewel of a place for anyone who enjoys nature. It is the least deforested state of Australia and one of the few places on Earth that still has vast areas of real wilderness. There is mountain range after mountain range, all of them spectacular in different ways, and the coastline is gorgeous all the way around. It is a bushwalker’s paradise. If you could live for a thousand years and walk every day, you could still be walking new tracks in Tasmania that had you oohing and aahing and happy to be alive.

Hobart and Launceston are cities on a human scale, sitting in sublime landscapes in which they seem only to be an afterthought. The architecture and parks are pretty, many people have lovely gardens, and there are a plethora of bookshops and places of interest to enjoy. You can breathe fresh air even in the city centres, and there are always natural landmarks to steer by, so it’s hard to get lost driving. The concrete monstrosities that infest so much of mainland Australia haven’t made many inroads into these cities, in part because of comparative economic poverty, which has kept the place rich in other and more important ways.

Tasmanian farming operates on a completely different scale to mainland farming. The fields are smaller and there is more diversity in the landscape. Volcanic soils in the north are rich and chocolatey and grow amazing potatoes. Things can change drastically just around the corner, at any corner. You see old livestock breeds all over the place that are hard to find on the “North Island”, as Tasmanians like to call the rest of Australia. There are lots of curves in the roads and lots of uphills and downhills. Little churches jump out at you, Gothic graveyards invite a visit for reflection. Place names make you laugh: Penguin, Nook, Nowhere Else, Promised Land, Snug, Flowerpot, Electrona, Paradise, Bagdad, Tomahawk, Lower Crackpot.

Brett and I had our first holiday in Tasmania in 2007, and after that we couldn’t stop going back. Early on in our marriage we were farmless and very free to travel. If we had two weeks off and a little money for plane tickets, we said, “Let’s go to Tasmania again.” On our first trip to the Apple Isle we hired a tiny yellow car whose gearbox went “clunk” every time we shifted into third gear, stayed in little chalets and walked over 200km of magnificent tracks in two weeks. In 2009 we went in our own car for an extended working holiday and packed a tent into the back for camping trips. Once we just spent a fortnight going around in a campervan. This was great fun, and we’d do it again in a flash.

If you live all the way over in Western Australia, like we do, it’s not economical to drive your own car across the Nullarbor to visit Tasmania just for a short holiday. There are reasonably-priced plane tickets to Tassie now, booking specials or stand-by seats on a no-frills airline. If you can schedule it, fly on the 13th of the month, it’s heavily discounted due to people’s superstitions.

If you have to fly in, you will need transport. A bicycle tour could be just the thing, perhaps with camping equipment in panniers. If you specifically want a walking holiday, motorised transport is helpful, and a campervan is your transport and accommodation in one. So for our Easter holidays in 2009, we hired a little campervan. It was small enough to manoeuvre easily and handle well on the road, yet we slept and ate in it comfortably. The back of the van contained a sink, pantry, small fridge, microwave and gas rings, and a comfortable double bed with a storage loft above where we kept our suitcases, toiletry bags, towels, jackets and backpacks. Living in a small basic space is a good exercise: It hones your organisation and creativity, and helps you focus on the things that really matter.

It was great to have everything with us on the road and to never have to unpack and repack every time we changed bases, and so handy to be able to stop and make a coffee anytime, get changed anywhere, and have a bed with you in case you get deadly tired in the middle of the day and need a power nap – as does happen when you have a walking holiday. Once we drove up Mt Wellington after an overnight snowfall there, took in the views, and made a snowman. When we got hungry we cooked a hot lunch right there on the mountain, before going outdoors again for a long hike in the white wonderland. The next morning, we were walking on a sunny beach in our T-shirts. That’s Tassie for you.

Tasmania has amazing produce, with which you can stock your campervan fridge to become your own roving restaurant. This is a fun and economical way to eat wonderfully well while sampling the local wares. We often had local mueslis with yoghurt and fruit for breakfast. Favourites on the lunch and dinner menus were steak sandwiches with caramelised onions, mushrooms and capsicum, and loads of fresh salad vegetables; eggs scrambled with mushrooms, tomatoes and handfuls of parsley on local sourdough bread; avocados and lemon on rye bread; pasta with mushroom, olive, feta and tomatoes; microwave jacket potatoes with mozzarella, parmesan and rocket; substantial salads; and our post-big-walk “resurrection soup” made with chicken stock, soup pasta, parsley, and slices of cheddar cheese added at the end until it just blends. These kinds of meals are straightforward to prepare when in a campervan – you can leave your baking and complicated cooking for when you get home.

Snacks are easy: We were buying marvellous apples, cherries, berries, peaches, etc, all over the place including roadside stalls. The Hill Street Grocer in West Hobart, our favourite shop in the world, sells exquisite fruit and vegetables, cheeses, memorable nut mixes, and a wonderful taramasalata which is great for dipping crunchy fresh celery in. We raided the Sandy Bay German Bakery repeatedly for their great bread, pretzels, nut horns, beestings, and other delicious morsels. We often ate wholemeal toast slathered with butter and gorgeous leatherwood honey. So you can see it is very easy in Tasmania to stay fuelled up for walking four to six hours a day on its fabled nature trails. The food and the walking go hand-in-hand, and allow you to come away from your holiday toned and glowing, with serious improvements in fitness and endurance, and unforgettable memories of adventures in scintillating landscapes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #232 ·

When travelling by campervan, we would overnight in trail head car parks so we could head out on a day hike straight after breakfast. Good toilet etiquette is paramount in the bush: Take a trowel and bury absolutely everything under the litter layer away from footpaths so it can compost away invisibly. It is amazing how many people seem to be unaware of this courtesy to nature and other walkers; don’t be one of them. Don’t wash your hands in the campervan’s kitchen sink afterwards either, as we’ve seen people do. You can use a simple water bottle turned into a tap by your spouse, or hand sanitiser if you prefer. When you need to do laundry or have a hot shower you can stay in a caravan park. We tended to do strenuous day hikes every second day, and drive to a caravan park after. Next day we would sightsee and do shorter walks and then stay in the bush somewhere.

Our favourite overnighter was in a layby off a tiny country road in northern Tasmania. There was a field of cattle next door and tall forest everywhere else. We had driven in at sunset, very slowly because there was so much wildlife crossing at that time – the sheer amounts reliably stagger mainlanders. After dinner and lights-out we lay snuggled up in the dark listening to a cacophony of sounds from insects, frogs, birds, bats and various marsupials, and looked out of the van windows at a crystalline Milky Way, far away from big-city light pollution. To us, those are the true riches of life!
 

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Discussion Starter · #235 · (Edited)
Thank you, @Knave. We went to town to get things from the pharmacy because paracetamol wasn't cutting it - he didn't sleep a wink last night with nonstop coughing. He's finally sleeping tonight, doped up to his eyeballs on cough suppressants and drowsy antihistamines. Miraculously I am as yet unscathed, but just telling you this will probably jinx it. I've never not caught a respiratory infection from him, but then this is the first time we're both religiously in our N-95s from the go-get, including to sleep, and eating socially distanced, and airing the house well, and the ill person showers last then airs the bathroom etc etc.

Tasmania is indeed spectacular; it's hard to fathom when you go there what an awful history it had as a brutal penal colony less than 250 years ago. Here's a song about that...


If you were Irish and fighting against the oppression of the British invaders to your country, even just by writing for an Irish newspaper, you were sentenced for treason - oh the irony. True to form over their invasion of Ireland, the British did the same to Australia, except here they didn't even recognise that there were human beings already present and declared it terra nullius. In Van Diemen's Land - Tasmania's first European name - the Indigeous people were systematically exterminated, just like the thylacine. For considerable amounts of time, Australian native peoples were managed by the same state departments that also handled flora and fauna. They didn't get to vote until 1962 and had their languages and culture suppressed just like the Irish had. In 2008 there was finally an official government apology for the Stolen Generations and other systematic injustices, and just this week we're moving ahead with constituitional recognition of our First Nations people and new parliamentary arrangements to ensure representation. It is all taking far too long and blocked at every turn by right-wingers, which is one of many many reasons I am a social progressive. In Australia, as in Ireland, it's not very helpful to justice matters to back the people who profited and continue to profit from the unfair allocation of power and resources. The punks saw that too, on a musical note, but they made awful music IMO and were more about the rebellion than about offering solutions.

Here's an excellent spoof which turns the tables on Australian history, made in 1986 and shown in schools ever since to help people understand what it would be like in the shoes of those who were disenfranchised historically:


Our own teacher showed us this - there were so many openly racist kids in my middle school forever making "jokes" about Aboriginal people, not to mention immigrants (me, for example) and LGBTIQ. It's good that we are making progress in this area. The current generation of kids is much more egalitarian and inclusive.
 

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@SueC, we are in the same boat as you & Brett. Lovely husband went on a work trip early this week, and came back with a gnarly cough. Obviously that only meant one thing. He tested Covid negative from Wednesday through Saturday, but is now testing positive. So far I am not but who knows why or when that will change. I would never say this to him because he already feels bad enough, but I am trying not to feel annoyed…he didn’t have to go on this work trip but did to make some political people happy, which makes it irritating. We’ve made it this far without being infected, but I suppose it was just a matter of time. Some sobering news today though, a colleague that was supposed to be on that trip didn’t make it because he was hospitalized with Covid-and today news came that he had died in the hospital over the weekend 😥 This disease is still so scary with the way it hits people.
 

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Thank you, @Knave. We went to town to get things from the pharmacy because paracetamol wasn't cutting it - he didn't sleep a wink last night with nonstop coughing. He's finally sleeping tonight, doped up to his eyeballs on cough suppressants and drowsy antihistamines. Miraculously I am as yet unscathed, but just telling you this will probably jinx it. I've never not caught a respiratory infection from him, but then this is the first time we're both religiously in our N-95s from the go-get, including to sleep, and eating socially distanced, and airing the house well, and the ill person showers last then airs the bathroom etc etc.

Tasmania is indeed spectacular; it's hard to fathom when you go there what an awful history it had as a brutal penal colony less than 250 years ago. Here's a song about that...


If you were Irish and fighting against the oppression of the British invaders to your country, even just by writing for an Irish newspaper, you were sentenced for treason - oh the irony. True to form over their invasion of Ireland, the British did the same to Australia, except here they didn't even recognise that there were human beings already present and declared it terra nullius. In Van Diemen's Land - Tasmania's first European name - the Indigeous people were systematically exterminated, just like the thylacine. For a long time, Australian native peoples were administered under the Wildlife Act. They didn't get to vote until 1962 and had their languages and culture suppressed just like the Irish had. In 2008 there was finally an official government apology for the Stolen Generations and other systematic injustices, and just this week we're moving ahead with constituitional recognition of our First Nations people and new parliamentary arrangements to ensure representation. It is all taking far too long and blocked at every turn by right-wingers, which is one of many many reasons I am a social progressive. In Australia, as in Ireland, it's not very helpful to justice matters to back the people who profited and continue to profit from the unfair allocation of power and resources. The punks saw that too, on a musical note, but they made awful music IMO and were more about the rebellion than about offering solutions.

Here's an excellent spoof which turns the tables on Australian history, made in 1986 and shown in schools ever since to help people understand what it would be like in the shoes of those who were disenfranchised historically:


Our own teacher showed us this - there were so many openly racist kids in my middle school forever making "jokes" about Aboriginal people, not to mention immigrants (me, for example) and LGBTIQ. It's good that we are making progress in this area. The current generation of kids is much more egalitarian and inclusive.
Greetings from Babakiueria!
Food Kitchen appliance Outdoor grill rack & topper Cuisine Home appliance
 

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Discussion Starter · #238 ·
@SueC, we are in the same boat as you & Brett. Lovely husband went on a work trip early this week, and came back with a gnarly cough. Obviously that only meant one thing. He tested Covid negative from Wednesday through Saturday, but is now testing positive. So far I am not but who knows why or when that will change. I would never say this to him because he already feels bad enough, but I am trying not to feel annoyed…he didn’t have to go on this work trip but did to make some political people happy, which makes it irritating. We’ve made it this far without being infected, but I suppose it was just a matter of time. Some sobering news today though, a colleague that was supposed to be on that trip didn’t make it because he was hospitalized with Covid-and today news came that he had died in the hospital over the weekend 😥 This disease is still so scary with the way it hits people.
How are you doing? I'm livid because the cause of the trouble for us is the usual suspect - Brett's father, who the rules never apply to apparently. Said he had a chronic cough from some lung condition and wouldn't wear a mask. I was, "Oh wow Brett, why did you even go in the house, you don't allow this at work!" but families have their own brainwash. Brett wore his N-95 but also had to eat. With someone coughing at the table. FFS. Of course I'm livid. It doesn't matter they tested negative, for one thing these antigen tests depend on how well you swab and often come up negative for the first few days, and for another there is a whole host of respiratory infections back out there with restrictions lifting which are also not fun to get, especially while you are supposed to be recovering from all your hard work on your precious annual leave. Thanks a lot. Great holiday for us. All because a person who purports to care about Brett can't be bothered to tell him he's got symptoms before Brett makes the long trip, and then won't take any precautions. And because the family are under this old man's hypnotic spell - he can never do any wrong - so Brett doesn't leave.

How hard is it to wear a mask? We've got record numbers of people dying in this country since mask mandates lifted, and at least one in twenty infections resulting in long COVID. The virus is mutating all the time and immunisation is only partly effective, just as with flu vaccines. So why at the very least can't sick people stay home and inform others not to visit, and wear masks if they absolutely have to go out? We wear masks in any public indoor situation or crowd as a matter of course, and it's not like it's a huge sacrifice. I wear pants too, wow, but what if I want to air my behind? What if I want to let it all hang out? It's so childish. Do I care about the health and wellbeing of my family and other people? Yes I do. Others don't, or have their heads in cloud cuckoo-land. And everyone suffers because of it. We're all interconnected.

Brett is still testing negative but whatever it is, isn't spreading it. He stayed in the car today as a precaution when I did the shopping. We both had N-95s on and though not symptomatic myself, was meticulous about hygiene and distancing everywhere I went. Brett only hopped out when we took the dog to the harbour, outdoors, no other people, still in his N-95 (which is also great for preventing secondary infections from the general environment and getting cold air in your compromised lungs).

It's actually not hard to do these things, and how much misery could we prevent if we all just did this. It wouldn't prevent all of it, but most of it. But then being asked to do small things out of commonsense and decency is clearly too much for a lot of people. I just need to look at the litter in our rural roadsides to have another demonstration of that attitude. Or watch yet another person cough on the fruit in the supermarket today. Wow, how excellent. :mad:
 

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I just got through my second round of covid. I thought we were all better, but big girl is just showing symptoms starting last night. She fell asleep bailing hay at midnight. She was told to take 15 minutes, and when she woke up the wheel fell off her tractor. Happy birthday to her this morning.

I went to work for her this morning, and she’s just laid around today. We can’t stop when we get sick, but we do stay away from town and other people. Isolating is easy when one is always isolated. Lol. I believe I got it from our vacation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #240 ·
Well, give her a hug and tell her happy birthday from me, @Knave, and sorry that she's ill on her birthday. From what you've said you've had a rough time with health in general of late so I am sending you good wishes and a pathogen-free octopus hug. 🐙

And also to you and lovely hubby, @egrogan. 🐙🐙
 
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