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i was hoping i could get some constructive criticism on my riding.. i have been riding for about five years. I rode english for about a year and turned western. i want to come back into the english world.. i have had one jumping lesson and that was about four years ago.. my friend and i was practicing jumping.. yes, i realize i absolutely have horrible two-point and form and a ton of other issues.. please critique and point out all the errors or problems you se.. My horse also is not a jumper but about two years ago we figured out that he can actually jump high(he jumped a lil pony with a rider on the pony's back. that was not on purpose but it is a long story so i wont go into details) anyways i know my horse can jump.. i just have never jumped him before..

please tell me anything i need to fix..which im sure is alot..lol.

thanks!
 

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sooo, honestly your position is terrible, the first thing I noticed is that your heels arent down and your leg is too far back.. it should be lined up with your girth. Alot of the pictures your either "behind" in the jump or your pirched too far up, meaning you really dont have a good grasp on the whole two point concept, your all over the place. As well you look to be very hunched over. out of a scale of one to ten Id give you a three. Any horse can jump, but there are those who you'll find are natural jumpers, they will tuck their legs up very neatly when going over, fairly collected, instead of flailing all over the place like your horse is doing.
 

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i would suggest taking a step back & practicing a lot of 2pt on the flat or over ground poles. also practicing your 2pt along with a release on the flat, so hold your 2pt & practice moving your hands up his neck, & holding for a moment, & then back to their regular position.
 

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I don't really agree with what brighteyes said about your horse. A lot of horses won't really try that hard over a small jump, and will tuck up a lot neater when going over higher jumps.
 

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I agree with gypsygirl- work on your two-point position on the flat, really concentrating on sinking your weight down into your heels. Also, make sure that the stirrup irons are on the balls of your feet. It looks like you could also go a half or full hole down with your stirrups in the flat pictures, but if it's comfortable for you, then I guess it's fine :). I just like longer stirrups better for some reason haha. Have you done trot poles before? They can really help with your balance and centering yourself over the saddle. Good job looking up in most of the pictures!
 

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I think Brighteyes is a bit too hash.....

I think, as a beginner, you are doing a good job of avoiding hurting your horse. While you are not keeping contact over the jumps, you are wisely giving more than you will later give as you gain experience. The worst thing you could do is "snatch" your horse over the jump. You are doing a good job, there. That release will keep you from hurting your horse while you gain your jumping balance. Good job.

You do need to use time in the half seat learning to stretch your heels down. I don't know your horse. You may need to use a lot of leg getting him over the little jump. If not, you may be grasping with the back of your calf. Try turning your toes more forward and turn them out just to use your heels to urge him forward. Then turn your toes back forward.

As you start keeping your heels down, the stirrups will not creep back on your foot when they are down. They will stay on the balls of your foot, where they belong. If the stirrups creep back, it will make it impossible to get those darn heels down.

Keep at it. I have seen far worse on very experienced "seasoned" riders.

And yes. as said above, most horses will not use themselves well over smaller jumps. They have no reason to. I wouldn't worry about "poor form" until the horse really has to use themselves ( around 3-3'3" at least).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks everyone for your help and the encouraging words.
i know im horrible at the moment. but i have only jumped about 8 times and last weekend(when these photos were taken) was the first time i had jumped in about two years.. lol...

i did ask for critiques so i really dont care how harsh you are or not. rudeness is a different story and could have been prevented but o well it shows the person's personality and it will come back and bite them in the butt oneday..
everyone starts somewheres..some are naturally good and others like me need lots of help..there is no need to discourage someone.

i hope noone takes that offensively but it the only way i could put things into words without sounding harsh myself.lol
but anyways, thanks again to everyone who gave me advice! :]
 

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aye aye aye... first step: get a trainer. there are so many things that need improving..just make sure you get some lessons and fix those problems as a beginner! sorry, but i agree with brighteyes, theres alot to work on. however, its good that your giving plenty of release! welcome back to english world, cute pony! good position takes ALOT of work and practice, but keep trying youll get it soon! :)
 

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As said previously, practising your 2-point, crest-release and doing transitions in these positions during flatwork will improve your position and balance overall :)
 

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keep up the good work!

I agree with Allison Finch as well. Good start, and it is good that you are taking care of your horse so he has a good start into jumping.

Don't worry about him not "being a natural jumper". He's fine! My big gelding rarely puts his legs together over jumps this small. It is more natural for them to simply make a larger canter stride.

In my book, it is better if your horse is relaxed and casual over jumps this size. It means he is comfortable and I am sure your caution with release to his mouth is a large portion of why this is.

Keep up the practice:lol:

*tip* go to Toys R Us and purchase one of those basketball sized rubber bouncy balls, and go home every night and squeeze it between your legs. This will help you strengthen your legs so they stay in place.
I do this all the time! It's great for everyone!:D
 

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Eh. Your position is messed up. Heels down. Get up over his neck a bit more, and sit farther forward. You aren't gripping with your calves very well.
 

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I agree with brighteyes08. I don't think she's being too harsh. She's just critiquing.
As a riding instructor myself, you need to turn your toes inward so that you grip with your upper leg and thigh. Not your calf. Also, bring your shoulders back and let your horse push you up, don't jump ahead of him. I think you need to lengthen your stirrup one hole. You aren't getting the flexibility you need in your calf and ankle at that length.
 

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I agree with what the other have said. Also try some grid work, and to get some stability, do some sessions without stirrups. If you are planning to get serious with jumping, then I suggest getting an intructer or trainer to help you progress further. Good luck. :smile:
 
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