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I'm new here too, but I'd really like to know what you guys think of my jumping position? Bearing in mind this was a bad jump for my boy :p and he hasnt been jumping for too long. He kinda tends to stretch his neck out a bit when he lands :p He's a 12 year old, 17.2hh TB gelding :D
 

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I can't really see how high the jump is but it looks to me your foot isn't down. heels down and your leaning to much on his neck. Hes a beautiful horse. Love bay tbs.
 

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The first thing that needs to be mentioned is that the ground line is on the wrong side of the fence, and that your horse had gotten in *really, really* close. This makes it difficult to evaluate either of yours' form, as he hasn't had adequate time/room to roll his shoulder and lift his forearm. Without considering the fence and the bad spot, some would say that he's hanging his knees pretty badly. He looks like a nice athletic horse that's trying to live to see dinner, so let's give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he can jump in good form if he gets to the fence in the appropriate balance and rhythm. Help him by rolling the ground line out on the take off side of the fence the same distance as the height of the fence. Be mindful of ground lines even when warming up in the schooling area.

I have a similiar critique for you - you look like a capable, athletic rider who's done herself no favors by posting this particular photo. Hard to maintain position when a horse chips and pops a fence like this. So, the obvious - your lower leg has slipped back, robbing you of necessary support. Your stirrup could be a hole or two shorter, so your knee angle is more closed and your leg stays firmly underneath you with a perpendicular stirrup leather. Closing your knee angle and securing your lower leg would allow you to wait with your upper body and bring your torso up and away from the neck.

Considering the circumstances, your release is good, you're looking up, and your back is admirably flat and relaxed.

Please post a photo of your horse jumping from an appropriate distance and you'll get a more useful critique.
 

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You are a bit "perched" - leaning too far forward. Nice crest release - as you and horse improve work on the release where your hands are in the middle of his neck (aka George Morris style for advanced riders).

So stabilize your lower leg - bend from waist don't throw upper body forward (not bad now just needs work).
 
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