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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there guys, this is my first post. I belong to another horse site where I have gotten critique for my jumping and it has improved it tremendously in about two months. I thought maybe I could get even more critique here because there are so many knowledgeable people. :)

This is my first picture I posted on the website I belong to two months ago:


This is now!:


Please critique the last picture! :) I really appreciate it and learn from the critique given.
 

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Edit: Didnt see the jump.
You look good. I like your heel. and your release :)
 

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The first picture is acctually about 10 times better than the second. In the first your leg is secure at the grith, in the second, it is way back behind you, which does nothing. Your leg is your base of support, therefore, it needs to be under you, encourgeing the horse forward.In the first picture, your seat and crotch are over the middle of the saddle, staying over the horse's center of balance, therefore, the horse can use itself to the fullest of it's cababilities. In the second picture, you are WAY ahead due to your not-there leg, which makes you use the horse's neck for balance because you can't use your leg. This puts almost your full weight on your horse's neck, which causes them to be thrown off balance, which causes more rails down. Work on getting your leg strong and unmovable underneath you. Lots of two point on the flat and over small jumps, and lots of strenghtening flatwork
 

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The first picture is acctually about 10 times better than the second. In the first your leg is secure at the grith, in the second, it is way back behind you, which does nothing. Your leg is your base of support, therefore, it needs to be under you, encourgeing the horse forward.In the first picture, your seat and crotch are over the middle of the saddle, staying over the horse's center of balance, therefore, the horse can use itself to the fullest of it's cababilities. In the second picture, you are WAY ahead due to your not-there leg, which makes you use the horse's neck for balance because you can't use your leg. This puts almost your full weight on your horse's neck, which causes them to be thrown off balance, which causes more rails down. Work on getting your leg strong and unmovable underneath you. Lots of two point on the flat and over small jumps, and lots of strenghtening flatwork
Couldnt agree more. I was going to say the same thing :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, I definitely agree with my leg and laying on his neck!

Although I do disagree that the first picture is better. Weight in my heels is basically non-existant and if my reins were shorter I would have pulled at his mouth.

But I definitely agree with everything else. Thanks :)
 

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Yea I was going to say the same thing. I think ur leaning to far up his neck.
 

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Thanks, I definitely agree with my leg and laying on his neck!

Although I do disagree that the first picture is better. Weight in my heels is basically non-existant and if my reins were shorter I would have pulled at his mouth.

But I definitely agree with everything else. Thanks :)
I second that the first picture is better. You're jumping way ahead of your horse in the second, and I believe, are jumping too high. You need to solidify your position over smaller jumps, like the first x-rail, before going higher. Also, for the size of the jump in the first picture the release is fine. You do NOT need a big release over small jumps, and a lot of the time that will actually hurt you more than help when you throw the reins away.

I'll let someone else go more into detail. But your position is much better in the first picture.
 

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The first picture is not better because you are gripping with your leg and holding yourself in the saddle, which hurts the horse's back. The reason the second photo is better is basically because you are moving more with the horse. Your leg has slipped slightly back but its elasticity has improved astronomically. The way to fix your leg is to fix your upper body by waiting a little for the jump and not "ducking" down. That causes an automatic movement in your leg to make up for the lack of balance. Keep improving, you are on the right track!
 

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I disagree with the people who think the second photo is better. What is better about having a leg slipped back and being up the horse's neck? The first photo is better because she has her leg under her, her back is straight, and she's not jumping ahead of her horse.

What is good about the second photo is your heel, though your leg has slipped back quite a bit, and your release is good. But laying on your horse's neck is not beneficial for either of you. Try to incorporate those good things into the position you had before.

:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks again every one. I do know for a fact I am improving because everything is much much smoother. We move together way better than I did before, where I was kind of just bouncing all over the place. I agree about my leg and upper body do need tons and tons of work, so we'll be working on that. :D
 

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Ocala.... You're supposed to grip with your leg... It pushes your horse over the jump, keeping the impulsion on te landing side and away. And keepig your leg on the horse does not hurt it's back... Sitting in the tack to much does... But jumping position... No
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