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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently brought at qh and i really want to teach her to jump but im not having much luck because she wont pick her back feet up when she goes over the jump.I dont want to show her or anything i just want to beable to take her out on a trail ride and if i see a log jump over it.
I was just wondring if Qhorses can jump or if you have to teach them diffrently because of the movement :)
Hope someone can help :)
 

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Hey there, im just getting started on this site but read your post and thought i might be able to help. Try lunging your horse over some jumps while increasing the height. I had the same problem with my QH mare. She takes jumps great now. Also what are you jumping it over now? Some people use plastic like polls, i have a friend you is a jumper maniac and when she helped me with my mare we used heavier round wooden polls so if she clipped them with her feet they dont fall right away and she knows they are there. This does not hurt her at all just sort of lets her know how high they are. hope this was a little helpful.
 

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My qh jumps just fine (in fact better than a lot, she's going solid at3'3" and wants them higher) so its not a matter of the breed, they're just as capable.

You should start your horse off over ground poles so she can get comfortable going over poles to start with and can get her legs all going in the right direction. Give her a couple days of being able to do that before you even move her off the ground, it is so easy to destroy a horses confidence by raising the jumps too quickly.

Once she can easily find her distance to the pole at the trot and the canter in both directions she is ready to move on. This means she is not kicking the pole 99% of the time, she splits the pole between her legs (preferably between front and back) and doesn't try to leap it with all 4 at the same time. Then you can raise one side 6-8 inches off the ground and continue (we use the white cavaletti blocks on their lowest side).

And then when she is going over that in the same way she is going over the ground pole you can move it up a little making a small x with the sides up to 1ft (the middle height on the white blocks).

This is the hardest part: let her figure it out. At this height if she crashes through it she's not going to hurt herself. You might, however, want someone there who can put the rails up if she knocks them down.

When she can do that then you can ride her over them but again get your butt out of the saddle and let her do it.

Ther are only a few reasons why horses will plow through jumps, they were either trained poorly, they aren't strong enough, or it could just be good old fashion human error. The last stride before the jump she needs to have her head and you need to be up off her back so she can jump, if you're doing this than it is one of the first two and the above steps should help with both along with consistent work focusing on strengthening your horses hindquarters.
 

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I recently brought at qh and i really want to teach her to jump but im not having much luck because she wont pick her back feet up when she goes over the jump.I dont want to show her or anything i just want to beable to take her out on a trail ride and if i see a log jump over it.
I was just wondring if Qhorses can jump or if you have to teach them diffrently because of the movement :)
Hope someone can help :)
I'm new to this forum & using the mobile version, so I apologize if this post looks weird.

I've always evaluated a horse's ability to jump by free jumping. Honestly, horses learn to jump well when we can be quiet and get out of the horse's way. It can be hard to stay out of your horse's way, especially of you're concerned about not making out over the jump. Make sure you have someone help you if you haven't free jumped before. There was a great article in Practical Horseman a few months back about it.

Quarter horses can jump just fine. My first horse was a quarter horse, and we even did cross country and horse trials to 3'6 before I outgrew him.
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Like the others, my first horse I used for jumping was a QH. Purebred and only 15hh, so it's not a matter of breed. Is there a chance it could be a pain issue? Sometimes they won't or can't pick up their back end very well if they are sore or their back is out. Maybe have that checked out too if you haven't?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all your help i went out to her yesterday and done some mor work with her and she is getting better she has been a broodmare for the past 10 years so she is supre unfit and her back leg is a bit stiff so i think it will just take some time for her to get her back in to work :)
 

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There is no such thing as a 'Quarter Horse Type' any more. The American Quarter horse is actually about 5 or 6 different types of horses that could be 'stand alone' breeds.

There are the Cutters, reiners and cowhorses. Most are not real big and they are very quick footed and athletic. Most do not have a lot of bone or endurance but they can handle themselves better than any other horse in the World.

Then there are Quarter Horse race horses. They are 75 to 95% Thoroughbed with mostly sprint breeding instead of 'route' horses than run over 6 furlongs or a mile or more.

There are the older 'Foundation-bred' ranch type of horses. They are usually coarser and heavier made than the modern cutters and reiners and probably the most versatile horses for everyday ranch use, roping and general purpose riding.

The Pleasure Horse industry is another specialty with horses bred for slow, low movement and bred to be pleasure horses.

The hunt seat horse is another specialty horse that is bred for hunt seat and over fence classes. They have TB conformation but not the big motor and desire to run like the racing horse.

You will find good 'over fence' horses from all types. Obviously, like any other horse bred to be great in a certain specialty, there are horses bred for jumping. About any horse can jump low jumps. Horses that fold their front feet tightly against their elbows and raise their knees high and also tuck their hind feet up high over a jump are 'naturals'. These horses will show this talent from the first jumps they go over. It is really neat to find one of these individuals because like the talented cowhorses, these horses can jump better on their worst day than some horses will ever jump in their lifetime.

When I used to look for horses with jumping talent, particularly horses coming off of the track, I would set up one or two jumps in a big round pen and let horses find their own way over them. The talented ones would let you know very quickly that they were special.

I used to jump horses over a lot of solid fences early in their schooling. I did this both under saddle and on a longe line. They were not real high, but they were real solid. If a horse did not learn to lift and tuck his feet, I found him a different job. He was probably not going to make a very good jumping horse and would not be real safe -- particularly if he dropped one or both front or hind legs when jumping.

So, Quarter Horses can come from World Class to very limited in ability.
 

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Here's to the small little QH cow bred horses. My QH mare is 14.1 hh, and has dabbled in a bit of everything. We have jumped small courses, competed in junior rodeos, and cut cattle. I think that the most important thing for any horse is a good foundation. Start with ground poles and work your way up. I am also a huge pattern fanatic. Riding through some patterns will really help you once you start jumping courses. (i.e. walk to center, halt, trot... canter circle... etc)
 
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