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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone.

So my 8 year old TB is always the scruffy looking one in the group these days. He wasn’t before when we lived in Florida but now we live in Virginia for the past 3 years and he’s had all types of skin issues (rain rot without rain lol, lice from another boarder, scratches, fungal issues, etc). All those became preset at a barn I started boarding at and I had to move him because of it and he got so much better. Now he’s just scruffy. However, still not how he was in Florida.

Everyone else’s horses look super shiny and these people don’t even feed them grain; they are all on grass at this one barn. They’re nice and fat and shiny without trying lol. My gelding can’t survive on just grass alone.

I’m one of the few who went and fed my horse and groomed him often. So here’s my horse, scruffy with his VERY early winter coat (he gets it in like September and everyone else in November or December), always missing patches of hair, always muddy lol.

He is on Purina Strategy and Farriers Formula due to feet that aren’t great either.

Is there anything I can do to keep him looking shiny and healthy? He doesn’t even look healthy because he’s dull looking. He’s UTD on everything. He’s getting a fecal next vet visit per the vets recommendation.

Just would like to know if anyone has any recommendations for me or has been through this. Thanks!
 

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Have you wormed him lately? If not I would worm him, and give him a little oil on his feed. Flax seed or you can use horseshine.
It might have to do with the weather also, Im sure its colder in VA than in FL, if hes native to FL, he might be trying to grow a thicker coat, which he might not know how to do being a FL native. I have noticed that my horses that were born and raised in FL don't have the coat that the ones I got from Northern states. Just my thoughts.
 

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Although you are feeding good feed are you feeding enough of it for the horse to meet daily minimums in vitamin & minerals along with amino acids in large enough supply?
A article by Purina about glossy coats and some ways to achieve them...
www.purinamills.com/horse-feed/education/detail/feeding-horses-for-a-shiny-coat

There are several styles of Strategy, maybe using one with a higher fat content is what you need?
As climate changes so do requirements of a animal change...
As ground sources, hay and pasture change with location so does what your animal derive from eating plants grown on local soils...
Another article and one of the points made is a worm load will dull a coat...you might not want to wait for that vet visit since having worms is really not good for any animal and can create serious issue if left to long.
https://www.horsejournals.com/feed-horse-shiny-coat
Besides doing that fecal, if the horse just doesn't look healthy I would be having blood drawn and sent out for a chemistry to find definitively what is lacking, what is not and if a balancing act needs done.
A full blood chemistry tells many tales...good and bad. :neutral:

:runninghorse2:...
 

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I would do a fecal ASAP. Also, flax, and oil added to the diet can help with shine. And I agree with horselovinguy above, if all of that checks out, I would have blood drawn to determine what is going on, whether it is a lack of nutrients or a medical condition. Good luck OP!
 

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Take a fresh fecal sample in to the vet's clinic. You should have the results within hours. You don't need to wait for the vet to come out.
 

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Take a fresh fecal sample in to the vet's clinic. You should have the results within hours. You don't need to wait for the vet to come out.
This. Just take a glove and a baggie and put a few "apples" in it. Take it to the vet and you should know within a couple of hours whether your horse has worms or not. And they can tell you what wormer and at what intervals (if they suggest more than 1 worming to help get rid of them), to use and do. My vet only charges $35 to bring him a fecal sample and check for worms. I do have fecal checks every 6 months at my regular vet visits, but if a horse is doing poorly, has a dull coat, losing weight, or having issues, I will bring one in as well.

Worms can become immune to worms. When I was younger, everyone suggested worming every 6-8 weeks, on a certain rotation of types of wormer. Now studies have shown that worms are becoming resistant to the wormers. So I only worm when necessary, if a fecal check shows that they need to be. I am not sure what sort of worming schedule you are on, or if you do the same, but something to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Take a fresh fecal sample in to the vet's clinic. You should have the results within hours. You don't need to wait for the vet to come out.
This. Just take a glove and a baggie and put a few "apples" in it. Take it to the vet and you should know within a couple of hours whether your horse has worms or not. And they can tell you what wormer and at what intervals (if they suggest more than 1 worming to help get rid of them), to use and do. My vet only charges $35 to bring him a fecal sample and check for worms. I do have fecal checks every 6 months at my regular vet visits, but if a horse is doing poorly, has a dull coat, losing weight, or having issues, I will bring one in as well.

Worms can become immune to worms. When I was younger, everyone suggested worming every 6-8 weeks, on a certain rotation of types of wormer. Now studies have shown that worms are becoming resistant to the wormers. So I only worm when necessary, if a fecal check shows that they need to be. I am not sure what sort of worming schedule you are on, or if you do the same, but something to think about.
Thanks everyone. He is wormed regularly.
But...
This is exactly what we were thinking.

I had been on a “rotation” of certain wormers so he’s definitely been wormed in that sense, but my vet says now the best way is to do fecals regularly and work it out from there, as suggested by your replies. He didn’t express any concern over my thoughts above, but I think I will get the fecal done sooner as per the replies here. Thanks, you guys!
 

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For skin problems, I'd mix up a spray bottle half full of Apple Cider Vinegar and 20-30 drops of tea tree essential oil and fill the rest with water. It helps skin problems and improves the quality of the coat. Also make sure that you are giving a very thorough curry when grooming. I highly recommend getting a pair of grooming gloves. If you want to make the spray like a natural show sheen also, add some fractionated coconut oil to it. I use it at shows and you can massage the spray into the hoof for infections. Always contact a farrier first though for hoof problems.


I agree with everyone else's responses and think that you should give those a try.
Feeding coconut oil is great too.

Thanks for listening yall!
 

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Thanks everyone. He is wormed regularly.
But...
This is exactly what we were thinking.

I had been on a “rotation” of certain wormers so he’s definitely been wormed in that sense, but my vet says now the best way is to do fecals regularly and work it out from there, as suggested by your replies. He didn’t express any concern over my thoughts above, but I think I will get the fecal done sooner as per the replies here. Thanks, you guys!
1. Yes to the fecals - especially since worms are developing a resistance to worm meds. De-worm your horse according to what the fecal results show -- do NOT de-worm the horse on a regular basis "just because":)

My horses are on big pasture so only get de-wormed twice yearly. I do fecals every spring and their egg counts are always very low, so the vet tells me to keep doing what I'm doing:)

2. You might think about adding some extra Vitamin E to the diet. I use pure Vitamin E with NO selenium added as we are a tch high in selenium in my area.

Both horses get 3,000 IU daily. The horse that is not insulin resistant also gets half cup of Omega-3 Horseshine daily. He's the guy with environmental allergies. While the Omega-3 Horseshine has helped a lot, he may very well have been hairless by the end of this hot/humid summer without the extra Vitamin E.

The IR horse gets the Vitamin E because he is IR and has foundered in the past. I need to keep his immune system bolstered.

Vitamin E is some good stuff for a lot of health issues:)
 
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