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I have an intact APHA colt. Nice breeding, GREAT personality, unique color, well built. I've been wrestling with myself lately though with the fateful question - To geld, or not to gelding?

We've had sincere interest in him already - from the pictures where he looks like absolute rubbish when we first got him - and people seem to love him. So obviously, there's already a market for him, and he looks ten times better now.

However, if gelded, he could go on to be a kick butt show horse. Though he could do that and be intact all the same. But the economy sucks, and quite honestly I'm not the type to say "Hand me $500, and I'll let him breed anything that neighs", there would definitely be an approval process - and I have no idea how well that would go around these here parts.

There are just as many pros and cons on each side. What I have decided to do, is let him show his yearling year in longe line and halter, keeping him intact, and seeing how many people are really interested in him at the bigger shows like Paint-O-Rama, etc. If not? He'll be gelded. No harm, no foul, right? If he starts going looney tunes, he'll be cut. That's that.


So I just have a question for everyone out there who might be in a similar situation as myself, or any current stallion owners - What ultimately makes you decide to geld (or not to geld) a colt?
 

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I've never had a colt to geld, but I would look at him in the most unbiased light I possibly could and say "is he awesome enough that his genes deserved to be passed on?". I would also have my trainer and experienced horse friends check him out to get their opinions.

Do you have pictures of him?
 

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Is it the colt in your barn? He's beautiful! What a story on him! I can't believe he didn't have a big old scar on him after that wound. Pretty boy : )
 

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I would seek an unbiased (no family, no friends, no one who "knows" the horse) opinion on his breeding potential and quality. Someone who doesn't love his personality, know his story or feel obligated to you will have the most critical eye.
 

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Now, I don't breed, but I know breeders and they generally get the colt inspected up the wazoo by all different types of registries to see if there's a bite.
If the colt is showing promise, they leave him until about 3-4 and see how he is performing under saddle and take him to some licensing events. If he gets accepted they keep him a stud and if he doesn't then he gets gelded.

So, if your colt can make it into the APHA, etc.. registry AND studbook, then you're in business.
 

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I have a four year old that is intact. I have been riding him and he is great and that is one of the reasons I am going to geld him this spring. I want to ride him more and the more I breed him the harder he will be to handle around other horses. There is also not nearly as much money in standing a stud as there was 5 years ago. He is going to enjoy being a gelding much more than being a stallion and my kids and I can enjoy him a little easier.
 

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It does take a lot of good training to keep a stud levelheaded after you begin breeding him. That being said, I can't comment on whether or not I think you should geld him because I don't know the horse, his breeding, his confo, or how he moves. I think you have a pretty good game plan but I would keep him intact until he is at least 2, maybe 3. Sometimes it is hard to get interest in a yearling because so many of them look so wonky all the time. Give him some time, get him started under saddle, and wait to see if his temperment will stay the same after all that testosterone hits his system. If he keeps his mellow attitude and does well in some of the under-saddle classes, then consider leaving him a stud.
 

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This is all my opinion.

From never even looking at the horse I would say geld him. Do you know how many really nice paint studs there are out in the world? (alot). There is alot that goes into breeding and quite frankly with todays economy and horse market no one should be breeding. Unless there will never be another really fricken amazing paint stud like him again (which I doubt, no offense) just geld him. But then again this is your horse, so do with it what you please. I just know around where I live the QH, paint, and ap market is down in the dumps. And the sad thing is I know people who are still breeding when they can't sell the other 20 horses they bred to begin with.
 

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Up until that last post I think there was some insightful things said.
I would most definitely get allot of opinions and keep him intact till he starts performing. If you don't think hes quite the quality its easy to just snip snip. You can always geld but you cant make him a stud again! :)
 

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Just for informational purposes based on a previous post on this thread--

APHA does not require inspection of performance testing of potential stallions. Colts are registered with full breeding rights just from having 2 registered parents-- he is a registered Paint and still a stallion, so he can be bred and sire registered Paint babies. So its a "free market" type thing as far as standing a Paint stallion- anyone can do it.

The stallion owner has control over most everything-- the better his pedigree is, the more accomplishments he earns being shown, the better he is marketed, the more his foals are shown and the better his foals do themselves, the better for his stallion career--it all can contribute to how well he will "do" as a stallion.

After that, its basically all up to the mare owners how well he will be received---they decide if they like him enough to bring their mares, how much they will pay, what quality of mare they will breed, etc.
 

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I have an intact APHA colt. Nice breeding, GREAT personality, unique color, well built. I've been wrestling with myself lately though with the fateful question - To geld, or not to gelding?

We've had sincere interest in him already - from the pictures where he looks like absolute rubbish when we first got him - and people seem to love him. So obviously, there's already a market for him, and he looks ten times better now.

However, if gelded, he could go on to be a kick butt show horse. Though he could do that and be intact all the same. But the economy sucks, and quite honestly I'm not the type to say "Hand me $500, and I'll let him breed anything that neighs", there would definitely be an approval process - and I have no idea how well that would go around these here parts.

There are just as many pros and cons on each side. What I have decided to do, is let him show his yearling year in longe line and halter, keeping him intact, and seeing how many people are really interested in him at the bigger shows like Paint-O-Rama, etc. If not? He'll be gelded. No harm, no foul, right? If he starts going looney tunes, he'll be cut. That's that.


So I just have a question for everyone out there who might be in a similar situation as myself, or any current stallion owners - What ultimately makes you decide to geld (or not to geld) a colt?
I gelded my boy because and only because of his attitude. He has A LOT of spunk, so we gelded him around 3yrs and he still acts the same but in a more orderly fashion lol. He's easier to control and more rideable.
Basically I would keep yours a stallion if he's a sweetheart, but if he has some issues, geld him and it may help (and make him easier to show)
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If you need or want a colt you keep a colt, if not you get him gelded.

All I would say is that I personally believe that gelding a colt after the age of 2 at the very latest is WRONG. We have a gelding who was castrated at the age of 3 (we have been following him since he was 2 but bought him when he was 5 before he fell ill). He is now 5 and critically ill. Vets and homoeopaths believe that one of the causes is a trauma in his childhood. We believe that this trauma was being gelded at the late age of 3. There are probably lots of people out there who will disagree with me but I stand by what I believe in! The sooner you get them gelded, the better!
 

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i bought a stallion at 10yrsof age and had him gelded i don,t think it matters what age they are,but to go back to the ops thread,unless you want a foal from him for yourself, i would cut him,you know yourself, the world is flooded out with horses and for as long as i an remember there was a saying ,,you will always sell a good one ,,well that may have been true,but there is that many good ones now every ones in the same boat
 

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If you need or want a colt you keep a colt, if not you get him gelded.

All I would say is that I personally believe that gelding a colt after the age of 2 at the very latest is WRONG. We have a gelding who was castrated at the age of 3 (we have been following him since he was 2 but bought him when he was 5 before he fell ill). He is now 5 and critically ill. Vets and homoeopaths believe that one of the causes is a trauma in his childhood. We believe that this trauma was being gelded at the late age of 3. There are probably lots of people out there who will disagree with me but I stand by what I believe in! The sooner you get them gelded, the better!
I agree with the sooner the better - however - our clinic has gelded many, many older (10+) aged stallions. Due to economy, abandonment issues, etc. While it is not ideal and certainly not as risk free as a younger horse, it does not cause any more "trauma" than any surgery.
 

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I'd like to know what reputable vet would say a horse was ill because of 'childhood trauma'.

Horses don't process things like humans do. I hardly think being gelded at 3 y/o was so traumatic for him that it made him ill to the point of death. Anthropomorphize much, dear?

Change 'lots of people will disagree with me' to the MAJORITY of people, and you'll have it right.
 

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I'd like to know what reputable vet would say a horse was ill because of 'childhood trauma'.

Horses don't process things like humans do. I hardly think being gelded at 3 y/o was so traumatic for him that it made him ill to the point of death. Anthropomorphize much, dear?

Change 'lots of people will disagree with me' to the MAJORITY of people, and you'll have it right.
LOL i, agree
 

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If you need or want a colt you keep a colt, if not you get him gelded.

All I would say is that I personally believe that gelding a colt after the age of 2 at the very latest is WRONG. We have a gelding who was castrated at the age of 3 (we have been following him since he was 2 but bought him when he was 5 before he fell ill). He is now 5 and critically ill. Vets and homoeopaths believe that one of the causes is a trauma in his childhood. We believe that this trauma was being gelded at the late age of 3. There are probably lots of people out there who will disagree with me but I stand by what I believe in! The sooner you get them gelded, the better!
That's not always true. My boy was gelded at 3 and is perfectly fine. He didn't even drop until almost three. It mostly depends on the horse
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