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Kunekune pig question?

437 Views 10 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  stevenson
We're looking to buy some kunekune pigs, and a friend has a pregnant, registered sow she is looking to sell. She said she has always birthed really well and is an excellent mother.
She wants $600 for her. Just curious if that's a decent price for her?
Thanks.
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Look on the internet for the breeders of these pigs or for sale, But for me there would be no way in Heck I would pay 600.00 for a pig, they are super cute as all get out, but 600.00 that pays for feed or hay for my horses, lol..
 

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@My Salty Pony, I know, that seems like a lot but looking on breeder's websites they are normally around $800- up to $3000 and even higher! 😱 Just depends on what you get and if it's registered or not.
This won't be just a farm pet, it will be kind of starting a little breeding business.
 

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@My Salty Pony, I know, that seems like a lot but looking on breeder's websites they are normally around $800- up to $3000 and even higher! 😱 Just depends on what you get and if it's registered or not.
This won't be just a farm pet, it will be kind of starting a little breeding business.
Then I would keep shopping. Apply the same thing to buying a breeding sow as you would to buying a breeding mare. Buy the best you can afford, look at the sow with a really critical eye and pick her apart. If you're going to breed, only breed the best to the best and be ready to cull (eat) anything that doesn't measure up. If what you're seeing is $800 low end and this sow is $600 and even given that you'd be getting a 'friends and family discount' she's still at the very low end, that would indicate she's probably and 'eater' not a 'keeper'.
 

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As someone who has recently gotten into Idaho Pasture Pigs my advice is to look at the Sow's lines and research them. Do the same with a boar you plan to get.
Does she meet the breed standard? How old is she? Is she currently bred to a registered KuneKune boar?
What are your plans for raising KuneKune's? Are you planning on breeding them for feeders or breeders? What is the demand in your area for them?
I paid $500 each for my registered IPP's and they were 8 weeks old, but there are not many IPP breeders in New England and I had to travel several hours to get a breeding trio that were not related.
 

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are these pets ?
I don't know what the OP is planning for the pigs, but the ones I have gotten are not pets. They will be used to produce feeder pigs for both sale and personal use. My trio is very friendly which is a good thing since you don't want any ornery boars around or sows that will not let you touch the piglets. There is only one other IPP breeder in New England and they are in Vermont with a years long waiting list. The IPP's meat is a bit darker than your typical commercial pig and they can get to market weight in less than a year mainly from just being on pasture. Their snouts are turned up similar to the KuneKune pigs that allows them to graze.
 

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I don't know what the OP is planning for the pigs, but the ones I have gotten are not pets. They will be used to produce feeder pigs for both sale and personal use. My trio is very friendly which is a good thing since you don't want any ornery boars around or sows that will not let you touch the piglets. There is only one other IPP breeder in New England and they are in Vermont with a years long waiting list. The IPP's meat is a bit darker than your typical commercial pig and they can get to market weight in less than a year mainly from just being on pasture. Their snouts are turned up similar to the KuneKune pigs that allows them to graze.
I did not know the snout angle made a difference. I see kune kune pigs for sale near me, and micro pigs and mini pigs.lol. Got into a huge arguement with a person about pets or food. They are food as far As I am concerned, because no pig is going to stay small if it is fed a lot of good feed. I have seen some really large sows before. A few hundred pounds and my gr grandfather raised hogs per my Dad. Most pigs are slaughtered before they become hogs. I saw one in the mountains by a fountain when we property searching, I said to my hubby look at that fountain its neat and look at the cement hog near it. Well that hog moved. Huge huge oinker. lol. He laughed and laughed .
 

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I did not know the snout angle made a difference. I see kune kune pigs for sale near me, and micro pigs and mini pigs.lol. Got into a huge arguement with a person about pets or food. They are food as far As I am concerned, because no pig is going to stay small if it is fed a lot of good feed. I have seen some really large sows before. A few hundred pounds and my gr grandfather raised hogs per my Dad. Most pigs are slaughtered before they become hogs. I saw one in the mountains by a fountain when we property searching, I said to my hubby look at that fountain its neat and look at the cement hog near it. Well that hog moved. Huge huge oinker. lol. He laughed and laughed .
This is my boar Spud the Stud my husband named him. He's just about 9 months and about 200lbs. He should get to 350lbs which is what the boars get to. Besides getting fresh grass all day, he gets a mix of grain, chopped hay, and minerals twice daily. He's so friendly and loves scratches. You can see his snout isn't very long and slightly upturned. This makes it easy for him to eat the grass when he's out in the paddock.
Plant Fawn Wood Terrestrial animal Grass


These gilts are Sunday and Suzie Q They are just under 8 months. The girls are different lines from the boar. You can see Sunday's snout it short also which is a trait of the breed that is very desired. We are hoping to have our first litters in April of next year.
Terrestrial animal Snout Dog breed Soil Natural material
[/QUOTE]
 

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This is my boar Spud the Stud my husband named him. He's just about 9 months and about 200lbs. He should get to 350lbs which is what the boars get to. Besides getting fresh grass all day, he gets a mix of grain, chopped hay, and minerals twice daily. He's so friendly and loves scratches. You can see his snout isn't very long and slightly upturned. This makes it easy for him to eat the grass when he's out in the paddock.
View attachment 1136483

These gilts are Sunday and Suzie Q They are just under 8 months. The girls are different lines from the boar. You can see Sunday's snout it short also which is a trait of the breed that is very desired. We are hoping to have our first litters in April of next year.
View attachment 1136485
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hmm, Wild pigs do not have turned up noses and graze okay. Or do the root less than a wild pig with the more upturned snout.
 
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