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Tripping can be caused by toes being too long, for one, and more importantly, can be caused by pain in the back of the foot.. Heel pain may be caused by a bad case of thrush, or assorted internal issues, such as navicular syndrome. A horse that moves correctly will typically land heel first, then roll over the toe and lift the foot off the ground. It is also common for a horse that is walking to land flat. Only a horse walking uphill should typically land toe first. A horse that has pain in the back of the foot will avoid landing on the heel and stab the toe into the ground first, which can result in a trip. Long toes delay the breakover too much. If her feet are in bad shape, these are prime concerns. Makes me crazy when people blame tripping horses on laziness. I don't think too many horses are so lazy that they'll allow themselves to fall on their faces deliberately. If you can watch the horse move, perhaps on a lunge line, you should be able to observe any toe first landing.

As for potassium, I wouldn't worry too much. Grasses tend to "accumulate" potassium and it's more likely to have too much than too little, IMO. If the hay being fed has been fertilized, one of the prime ingredients in the fertilizer will be potassium. Good luck with this poor horse.
 
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