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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My Clydes has been lame off and on for roughly a year. Originally it was thought the farrier was the cause. We have changed farriers and the new one has been doing her feet for the last 3 trims (Since August). He comes every 6 wks. I called the vet out at his suggestion because he didn't see anything that would cause her lameness. The vet did x-rays and said she has a medial sesamoid bone cyst. We treated it with Osphos and are now giving her Equi-bone. We will repeat x-rays in about 6 mos. The vet consulted with another vet and they both agreed that this shouldn't cause the lameness. Christmas day I was picking her foot and she immediately went lame. I walked her out of it and she was fine. I even rode her with someone observing her and she looked completely normal even at a trot. As soon as I got off she was limping again. I called the vet Saturday and told him what happened and he is baffled. The vet doesn't think her back is out or that she has thrush. Oh and she was running and bucking (she was having fun) with my daughter on her a few days before and was just fine. I'm at my wits end. I hate to see her limping around the pasture. Does anyone have any thoughts?
 

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1. Did the vet also x-ray the hooves? If not, I would want them x-rayed.

2. Assuming there were hoof x-rays and they were clean, Unless the vet physically had hands on the Clyde’s back, he/she can’t possibly know whether or not something is out.

Were this my horse, I would spend the money on a first class chiro to examine her:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
1. Did the vet also x-ray the hooves? If not, I would want them x-rayed.

2. Assuming there were hoof x-rays and they were clean, Unless the vet physically had hands on the Clyde’s back, he/she can’t possibly know whether or not something is out.

Were this my horse, I would spend the money on a first class chiro to examine her:)
No hoof x-ray. He examined her hooves and didn't seem to think her hooves were the problem. The ferrier and vet have both hoof tested her. Maybe I will call another vet and get a second opinion. She never stays lame long enough for the vet to get out here to do a block. This is making me crazy and waking me up all hours of the night. Could tendons be rubbing on the bone cyst and that is causing the lameness? She was only swollen from it once. The lameness seems to happen right around the time she is due for a trimming.
 

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I can say from experience, hoof testers don‘t always speak the truth.

In 2012, my IR horse passed the hoof tester test with flying colors one week before he foundered so bad, I thought I might lose him.

I am not saying you’re dealing with laminitis, but I am saying it’s entirely possible there is some sort of on/off issue happening inside a hoof or hooves.

It could be anything from mild laminitis, to a bone fracture, to mild arthritis to ??

If you have another vet (hopefully a lameness vet) nearby, or you can carry her to a hospital, I would spend the money on hoof x-rays.

FWIW, in Fall 2019, I knew my IR horse had some sort of arthritis going on in his right hoof. His last hoof x-rays had been in 2015 and they were clean.

He had developed off/on lameness that was getting progressively worse, mostly when the farrier nailed his corrective package on. He still has good hooves for all he’s been through. I can’t ride him, so he at least only needs two nails on each side of the hoof and no clips.

The 2019 x-rays revealed two spots of arthritis in the right hoof. One at the top of the P3, the other at the coronet band. Even though I knew bad news was coming, I still wasn‘t prepared to see two places.

He has to have shoes, pads, and packing on the front. When my farrier (who is a therapeutic farrier) saw the x-ray, she suggested plastic shoes as they are flexible. Smartest thing I ever agreed to.

If your horse needs to be in shoes, look at the EasyCare “Versa” shoe; there are several models. There are also other brands of flexible plastic shoes on the market. Even if nothing shows In hoof x-rays,if your horse needs to be in shoes, the flexible shoes may be a big help in reducing jarring in the legs:)

Having said that ^^^^^, I would still want to eliminate everything, so I would still look for a high caliber vet (can be a holistic vet/chiro. One that also does acupuncture would be a huge benefit.

My IR horse also has a twice-fractured sacrum and now has Cushings. The untrained eye wouldn’t know there’s anything wrong with him but I have spent a lot of money for things that do work — and things that did not. His quality of life is better than mine:rolleyes:

She is a big girl. It is possible that, dealing with bone cyst, could even be triggering mild laminitis. My IR horse developed mild laminitis on his hind hooves after he fractured his back the second time — this after having foundered on the front from metabolic issues. It’s a lot of stress on those little hooves, when one comes side res all the weight they have to haul around:)
 
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No hoof x-ray. He examined her hooves and didn't seem to think her hooves were the problem. Maybe I will get a second opinion. She never stays lame long enough for the vet to get out here to do a block. This is making me crazy and waking me up all hours of the night.
I can say from experience, hoof testers don‘t always speak the truth.

In 2012, my IR horse passed the hoof tester test with flying colors one week before he foundered so bad, I thought I might lose him.

I am not saying you’re dealing with laminitis, but I am saying it’s entirely possible there is some sort of on/off issue happening inside a hoof or hooves.

It could be anything from mild laminitis, to a bone fracture, to mild arthritis to ??

If you have another vet (hopefully a lameness vet) nearby, or you can carry her to a hospital, I would spend the money on hoof x-rays.

FWIW, in Fall 2019, I knew my IR horse had some sort of arthritis going on in his right hoof. His last hoof x-rays had been in 2015 and they were clean.

He had developed off/on lameness that was getting progressively worse, mostly when the farrier nailed his corrective package on. He still has good hooves for all he’s been through. I can’t ride him, so he at least only needs two nails on each side of the hoof and no clips.

The 2019 x-rays revealed two spots of arthritis in the right hoof. One at the top of the P3, the other at the coronet band. Even though I knew bad news was coming, I still wasn‘t prepared to see two places.

He has to have shoes, pads, and packing on the front. When my farrier (who is a therapeutic farrier) saw the x-ray, she suggested plastic shoes as they are flexible. Smartest thing I ever agreed to.

If your horse needs to be in shoes, look at the EasyCare “Versa” shoe; there are several models. There are also other brands of flexible plastic shoes on the market. Even if nothing shows In hoof x-rays,if your horse needs to be in shoes, the flexible shoes may be a big help in reducing jarring in the legs:)

Having said that ^^^^^, I would still want to eliminate everything, so I would still look for a high caliber vet (can be a holistic vet/chiro. One that also does acupuncture would be a huge benefit.

My IR horse also has a twice-fractured sacrum and now has Cushings. The untrained eye wouldn’t know there’s anything wrong with him but I have spent a lot of money for things that do work — and things that did not. His quality of life is better than mine:rolleyes:
Thank you. I will call another vet to see what he thinks. I am so confused how she can run and buck and is fine, and a few days later comes up lame from picking her hoof?
 

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Thank you. I will call another vet to see what he thinks. I am so confused how she can run and buck and is fine, and a few days later comes up lame from picking her hoof?
That sort of on/off lameness is more often associated with sub-clinical laminitis - often not even detected with x-rays as there may be zero rotation of the coffin bone - yet.

She is a Clyde and they are prone to metabolic issues:confused:

EMS is often undiscovered until the horse or pony develops laminitis (“founder”). “Laminitis” means inflammation of the lamina, which is the tissue that attaches the hoof to the coffin bone in the foot. Mild episodes of laminitis can be confused with sole bruising, arthritis, or foot soreness following trimming or shoeing. Clinical laminitis results in lameness and sometimes changes in the coffin bone of the foot on radiographs (x-rays). Subclinical laminitis (horse may not be lame) is characterized by divergent growth rings on the hooves, separation at the white line near the toe, or rotation of the coffin bone on radiographs in the absence of lameness. Laminitis is frequently triggered by a dietary change, such as sudden pasture turnout or during the spring when the grass is green and growing rapidly. The link between insulin resistance, equine metabolic syndrome and laminitis is currently not completely understood.

Copied from this link. https://www.equine.umn.edu/research...quine-metabolic-syndrome/laminitis-or-founder

You can google “equine sub clinical laminitis”. And get quite a few hits. This one happened to be a .edu link.

You will notice the article comments x-rays often won’t show anything when laminitis is in the early on/off stages. That’s how so many people miss it and sometimes wrongly accuse the farrier of bad trimming; that can be the case sometimes but not always:)

This means you may possibly be dealing with metabolic issues, along with whatever else she is b3ing treated for or examined for:)
 
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I’m so sorry! I was in a similar situation 2 years ago. My guy came up lame and got the vet out. Diagnosed as abscess, treated accordingly, became sound, simple fix, right? Little did I know I was about to be in a battle for his life for the next year and a half. He was in a never ending cycle to seem okay then come up lame again. The limping seemed worse if it was wet out, and his feet were softer and more sensitive. Multiple vet visits, xrays, farrier and always told abscess, thrush etc. FINALLY a 3rd set of X-rays revealed P3 osteomyelitis (bone infection) Looked like a shark bite out of his pedal bone! Nobody could really pin point the original cause but one vet suggested there was a possible keratoma (tumor) that the pressure and growth of it was irritating and allowed infection to take hold, and without removing the keratoma the infection would just come back after antibiotics. Is it possible the cyst is irritating the area and causing an underlying infection not visible on X-ray? With my guy he ended up dropping pus eventually but took over 6 months, and nothing showed on X-ray until the end. Sadly he succumbed to the infection :( Don’t lose hope. There is an answer so keep trying. Get as many different vets/farrier involved as you can. Had I been more adamant about my feeling that SOMETHING bigger was going on, I may have been able to save my horse before it got to a point of no return.
 

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I am so confused how she can run and buck and is fine, and a few days later comes up lame from picking her hoof?
Sure they can. Horses can good days and bad days with chronic pain; just like humans. On the days she's feeling good, she plays. On the days she is not, you see the lameness.

My old horse Beau was 14 when I decided to put him down. Most days, he couldn't even trot on his own, due to severe hock and pelvis arthritis. But some days, he was out bucking with the yearling colts.

My Clydes has been lame off and on for roughly a year. Originally it was thought the farrier was the cause. We have changed farriers and the new one has been doing her feet for the last 3 trims (Since August). He comes every 6 wks. I called the vet out at his suggestion because he didn't see anything that would cause her lameness. The vet did x-rays and said she has a medial sesamoid bone cyst. We treated it with Osphos and are now giving her Equi-bone. We will repeat x-rays in about 6 mos. The vet consulted with another vet and they both agreed that this shouldn't cause the lameness. Christmas day I was picking her foot and she immediately went lame. I walked her out of it and she was fine. I even rode her with someone observing her and she looked completely normal even at a trot. As soon as I got off she was limping again. I called the vet Saturday and told him what happened and he is baffled. The vet doesn't think her back is out or that she has thrush. Oh and she was running and bucking (she was having fun) with my daughter on her a few days before and was just fine. I'm at my wits end. I hate to see her limping around the pasture. Does anyone have any thoughts?
How old is your horse? Did I miss that?

This is clearly a chronic long term problem, if it has been going on a year.

Your horse doesn't need to be obviously lame for a GOOD equine vet to do flexions and (if needed) nerve blocks to isolate the source of the lameness. So find the BEST lameness vet you can in your area, and haul your horse in.

As already suggested, it could be a low grade laminitis that comes and goes.
It could also be navicular type problems. Now I understand you have a Clyde but my horse Red (quarter horse) also has on-and-off type lameness too. While his x-rays are perfectly clean, he has heel pain in both front feet. His left one is worse. He would have good days and bad days. And his lameness was never bad. Just a very, very slight head bob once in a while.

I agree that chiroproctors can be very helpful as well, but I would start first with a good vet. It can be helpful for your chiro to know what issues were discovered as they can possibly better treat your horse.

Lameness is a ******. All three of my horses have things going on, and currently trying to figure out Shotgun at the moment. Set up for back x-rays in a couple months (since it's the off season with winter anyway).
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’m so sorry! I was in a similar situation 2 years ago. My guy came up lame and got the vet out. Diagnosed as abscess, treated accordingly, became sound, simple fix, right? Little did I know I was about to be in a battle for his life for the next year and a half. He was in a never ending cycle to seem okay then come up lame again. The limping seemed worse if it was wet out, and his feet were softer and more sensitive. Multiple vet visits, xrays, farrier and always told abscess, thrush etc. FINALLY a 3rd set of X-rays revealed P3 osteomyelitis (bone infection) Looked like a shark bite out of his pedal bone! Nobody could really pin point the original cause but one vet suggested there was a possible keratoma (tumor) that the pressure and growth of it was irritating and allowed infection to take hold, and without removing the keratoma the infection would just come back after antibiotics. Is it possible the cyst is irritating the area and causing an underlying infection not visible on X-ray? With my guy he ended up dropping pus eventually but took over 6 months, and nothing showed on X-ray until the end. Sadly he succumbed to the infection :( Don’t lose hope. There is an answer so keep trying. Get as many different vets/farrier involved as you can. Had I been more adamant about my feeling that SOMETHING bigger was going on, I may have been able to save my horse before it got to a point of no return.
I called the vet who has been treating her. He does want to do a block when she is lame again and I asked him to do a hoof x-ray. He said of course. 😊 I do want to give him a chance to figure it out. Our appointment is tentatively Monday afternoon. She is back to normal today running and bucking with her pasture mate. 🤦‍♀️ It rained all day, so the wet doesn’t seem to bother it. The ferrier comes Friday, so I suspect she will come up lame from the stress of all her weight on it while being trimmed.
 

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So, firstly, don't ride her any more, until she is sorted out. That she bucked with your daughter riding her was very possibly not 'just for fun'. From the info you've given, can't give more than wild guesses here, of what it might be. If you could post pics - both confo & hoof pics(see link in my signature line for what's needed of hoof pics), and if you have rads, post them too. That might give us some clues.

So...to make sure I got it right, the horse has been on/off lame for a year. Initially you thought it was farrier error, so after around 6-8 months of her lameness(?) you changed farriers. What made you think it was farrier error? Did you ever have a vet in, in the first half year of lameness? Any other equine practitioners to see her? Were you riding her in that time? Was she lame, or more lame in certain situations or certain movements, like circling?

Second farrier couldn't see anything obviously wrong & he told you to call in vet. When was that - back in August, or only recently? What did the vet do exactly, & why he decided to take a radiograph of the horse's fetlock(?), but not hooves or anywhere else? Is he specialised in equine bodywork, to tell you that he told you her back is not out? As he diagnosed the sesamoid cyst, I'm gathering he thought that was THE problem, until he consulted with another vet to discover they're not generally a cause of lameness?

So... What's done is done now(& possibly what you've told gives the wrong idea), but for future reference, it is not appropriate to just leave a chronically lame horse for months without any attempt at diagnosis/treatment. This may well mean that something that could have been minor, easy to fix back when, is now a major, permanent issue. For eg. soft tissue injuries if left untreated with start to ossify(become osteo-arthritis) within only 6-8 weeks!!

So, I'd go all out to try to find & correct whatever the problem is now, and sounds to me like your vet may not be all that knowledgeable, but even if he is, if he's 'stumped' and (apparently) hasn't done many diagnostics on her, I'd want a second opinion, from a lameness expert vet - as opposed to just any old vet. Start with a full lameness work up & hoof rads, and go from there. **If getting hoof rads, ask/ensure the vet marks the hooves with something radio lucent; mark the dorsal wall, from the hairline, and the apex/point of frog. That will help give a much more accurate idea when viewing them later.
 

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He examined her hooves and didn't seem to think her hooves were the problem. The ferrier and vet have both hoof tested her.
Unfortunately that means nothing much. Many vets - and even farriers - don't really have an indepth knowledge of hoof form & function, and they're also so used to seeing ill feet, as to take that as 'normal'. So they often don't recognise problems until they're really bad. And 'hoof testers'... can indeed be helpful to get an idea. But they're not a reliable diagnostic tool. For one, horses are stoic by nature & also training, may well try to 'ignore' pain, so not respond obviously to hoof testers. Also remember that anything in between the pliers can be the cause of a reaction, they're not very specific.

The lameness seems to happen right around the time she is due for a trimming.
Horses commonly get lame around this time for a few reasons. Number one is that the hooves have been left to get overgrown between trimming, and by 6 weeks, they're significantly so, which may bev causing tearing & strain at every step. 'Low grade laminitis' can be due to mechanics only(as opposed to metabolic), and this can be one 'symptom'. I know 6-weekly is the common 'norm' for a farriery schedule, but this is simply too long for most horses in most situations IME, to keep the hooves in good functional form. Instead they have become overgrown & distorted by then & started doing further damage. Also if there were existing problems needing to be 'corrected', it will be hard/impossible for a farrier to make any great changes, when every visit he's having to 'chase his tail' & get back to square one. So I'd suggest 4 weekly trims, to keep feet in good shape, as being about as long as you'd want to go max, between trims. Depending on the situation/horse, you might want to do it even every 2-3 weeks, if there are problems needing gradual correction.
 

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I called the vet who has been treating her. He does want to do a block when she is lame again ...
The ferrier comes Friday, so I suspect she will come up lame from the stress of all her weight on it while being trimmed.
If the vet does indeed know what he's on about, he will be able to do a number of diagnostic checks, and yes, including a nerve block, if she is not actively lame.

So the second sentence above... sounds like it's immediately after a trim that she is lame. So assuming it's not 'direct', due to farrier error - for eg. commonly farriers pare sole & frog routinely, which can make horses tender - 'low grade laminitis' is a very common reason for this to happen. The other option is, if she has joint pain, the farrier flexing & making her hold herself in certain ways may cause her to be sore. And you said she came up lame when you were cleaning her foot, but came good soon after - which sounds like it could be due to joint pain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sure they can. Horses can good days and bad days with chronic pain; just like humans. On the days she's feeling good, she plays. On the days she is not, you see the lameness.

My old horse Beau was 14 when I decided to put him down. Most days, he couldn't even trot on his own, due to severe hock and pelvis arthritis. But some days, he was out bucking with the yearling colts.



How old is your horse? Did I miss that?

This is clearly a chronic long term problem, if it has been going on a year.

Your horse doesn't need to be obviously lame for a GOOD equine vet to do flexions and (if needed) nerve blocks to isolate the source of the lameness. So find the BEST lameness vet you can in your area, and haul your horse in.

As already suggested, it could be a low grade laminitis that comes and goes.
It could also be navicular type problems. Now I understand you have a Clyde but my horse Red (quarter horse) also has on-and-off type lameness too. While his x-rays are perfectly clean, he has heel pain in both front feet. His left one is worse. He would have good days and bad days. And his lameness was never bad. Just a very, very slight head bob once in a while.

I agree that chiroproctors can be very helpful as well, but I would start first with a good vet. It can be helpful for your chiro to know what issues were discovered as they can possibly better treat your horse.

Lameness is a **. All three of my horses have things going on, and currently trying to figure out Shotgun at the moment. Set up for back x-rays in a couple months (since it's the off season with winter anyway).
She is 14. The vet I am using is supposed to be the best in the area and comes highly recommended. If he doesn’t find anything Monday I will contact another vet I have used before.
So, firstly, don't ride her any more, until she is sorted out. That she bucked with your daughter riding her was very possibly not 'just for fun'. From the info you've given, can't give more than wild guesses here, of what it might be. If you could post pics - both confo & hoof pics(see link in my signature line for what's needed of hoof pics), and if you have rads, post them too. That might give us some clues.

So...to make sure I got it right, the horse has been on/off lame for a year. Initially you thought it was farrier error, so after around 6-8 months of her lameness(?) you changed farriers. What made you think it was farrier error? Did you ever have a vet in, in the first half year of lameness? Any other equine practitioners to see her? Were you riding her in that time? Was she lame, or more lame in certain situations or certain movements, like circling?

Second farrier couldn't see anything obviously wrong & he told you to call in vet. When was that - back in August, or only recently? What did the vet do exactly, & why he decided to take a radiograph of the horse's fetlock(?), but not hooves or anywhere else? Is he specialised in equine bodywork, to tell you that he told you her back is not out? As he diagnosed the sesamoid cyst, I'm gathering he thought that was THE problem, until he consulted with another vet to discover they're not generally a cause of lameness?

So... What's done is done now(& possibly what you've told gives the wrong idea), but for future reference, it is not appropriate to just leave a chronically lame horse for months without any attempt at diagnosis/treatment. This may well mean that something that could have been minor, easy to fix back when, is now a major, permanent issue. For eg. soft tissue injuries if left untreated with start to ossify(become osteo-arthritis) within only 6-8 weeks!!

So, I'd go all out to try to find & correct whatever the problem is now, and sounds to me like your vet may not be all that knowledgeable, but even if he is, if he's 'stumped' and (apparently) hasn't done many diagnostics on her, I'd want a second opinion, from a lameness expert vet - as opposed to just any old vet. Start with a full lameness work up & hoof rads, and go from there. **If getting hoof rads, ask/ensure the vet marks the hooves with something radio lucent; mark the dorsal wall, from the hairline, and the apex/point of frog. That will help give a much more accurate idea when viewing them later.
Unfortunately that means nothing much. Many vets - and even farriers - don't really have an indepth knowledge of hoof form & function, and they're also so used to seeing ill feet, as to take that as 'normal'. So they often don't recognise problems until they're really bad. And 'hoof testers'... can indeed be helpful to get an idea. But they're not a reliable diagnostic tool. For one, horses are stoic by nature & also training, may well try to 'ignore' pain, so not respond obviously to hoof testers. Also remember that anything in between the pliers can be the cause of a reaction, they're not very specific.

Horses commonly get lame around this time for a few reasons. Number one is that the hooves have been left to get overgrown between trimming, and by 6 weeks, they're significantly so, which may bev causing tearing & strain at every step. 'Low grade laminitis' can be due to mechanics only(as opposed to metabolic), and this can be one 'symptom'. I know 6-weekly is the common 'norm' for a farriery schedule, but this is simply too long for most horses in most situations IME, to keep the hooves in good functional form. Instead they have become overgrown & distorted by then & started doing further damage. Also if there were existing problems needing to be 'corrected', it will be hard/impossible for a farrier to make any great changes, when every visit he's having to 'chase his tail' & get back to square one. So I'd suggest 4 weekly trims, to keep feet in good shape, as being about as long as you'd want to go max, between trims. Depending on the situation/horse, you might want to do it even every 2-3 weeks, if there are problems needing gradual correction.
My farrier and vet both come highly recommend.
I was going to ask the farrier on Friday if he thought she needed to be trimmed sooner. My horse’s hooves look great since I changed farriers.
As far as your comment about not tending to the lameness sooner, I have only owned her for about 3 or 4 months. I have known her for 6 years. It’s a long and complicated story and I don’t regret at all that she is now mine. I am doing what I can to try and take care of her. I haven’t owned horses all my life, so I don’t know a whole lot about owning one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If the vet does indeed know what he's on about, he will be able to do a number of diagnostic checks, and yes, including a nerve block, if she is not actively lame.

So the second sentence above... sounds like it's immediately after a trim that she is lame. So assuming it's not 'direct', due to farrier error - for eg. commonly farriers pare sole & frog routinely, which can make horses tender - 'low grade laminitis' is a very common reason for this to happen. The other option is, if she has joint pain, the farrier flexing & making her hold herself in certain ways may cause her to be sore. And you said she came up lame when you were cleaning her foot, but came good soon after - which sounds like it could be due to joint pain.
[/
If the vet does indeed know what he's on about, he will be able to do a number of diagnostic checks, and yes, including a nerve block, if she is not actively lame.

So the second sentence above... sounds like it's immediately after a trim that she is lame. So assuming it's not 'direct', due to farrier error - for eg. commonly farriers pare sole & frog routinely, which can make horses tender - 'low grade laminitis' is a very common reason for this to happen. The other option is, if she has joint pain, the farrier flexing & making her hold herself in certain ways may cause her to be sore. And you said she came up lame when you were cleaning her foot, but came good soon after - which sounds like it could be due to joint pain.
Not always after a trim. As hard as I try to pinpoint what action causes the lameness it may not cause it the next time.
 

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Not always after a trim. As hard as I try to pinpoint what action causes the lameness it may not cause it the next time.
I am going to add my two cents based on my deteriorating back, so bear with me:)

I have dealt with trauma damage to my discs and spine my entire life. Now that I am 73 the discs have reached varying stages of deterioration.

Sometimes turning wrong while cleaning stalls can put something out, sometimes simply turning in my sleep can cause me grief the next day. There is no rhyme or reason for my “lameness” but, nonetheless, the damage is there and MRI’s & CT’s show all the damage.

Also, I have sent my IR horse out to pasture for the day, and he goes out feeling on top of the world, yet he has come in at night in obvious discomfort. He could have turned, twisted, pivoted, stepped in a dip in the ground the wrong way.
My point is that is probably why you can’t pinpoint a reason for lameness “today” - it just depends.

There is something wrong with your mare. Hopefully further testing and x-rays will show something. If not, keep looking via other vet, including holistic vets as they can sometimes see issues thru different eyes and pick up on somethin.

Take heed @Shelbye720 thoughts in post #7. Which I am so sorry for her loss, especially when it seems it didn’t have to happen that way, had the vet’s been on the ball.

Please keep updating. Not only do we want to know the outcome of further testing for your sake but mystery lameness issues like this are not uncommon. Knowing the root cause of the lameness can benefit many:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am going to add my two cents based on my deteriorating back, so bear with me:)

I have dealt with trauma damage to my discs and spine my entire life. Now that I am 73 the discs have reached varying stages of deterioration.

Sometimes turning wrong while cleaning stalls can put something out, sometimes simply turning in my sleep can cause me grief the next day. There is no rhyme or reason for my “lameness” but, nonetheless, the damage is there and MRI’s & CT’s show all the damage.

Also, I have sent my IR horse out to pasture for the day, and he goes out feeling on top of the world, yet he has come in at night in obvious discomfort. He could have turned, twisted, pivoted, stepped in a dip in the ground the wrong way.
My point is that is probably why you can’t pinpoint a reason for lameness “today” - it just depends.

There is something wrong with your mare. Hopefully further testing and x-rays will show something. If not, keep looking via other vet, including holistic vets as they can sometimes see issues thru different eyes and pick up on somethin.

Take heed @Shelbye720 thoughts in post #7. Which I am so sorry for her loss, especially when it seems it didn’t have to happen that way, had the vet’s been on the ball.

Please keep updating. Not only do we want to know the outcome of further testing for your sake but mystery lameness issues like this are not uncommon. Knowing the root cause of the lameness can benefit many:)
Thank you for your two cents. I will definitely keep pushing until we figure it out. She is only 14 and I hope to have many more years with her. I’m not what you would call a equestrian. I just recently started riding at a walk. I’m 47. She is the only horse I have ridden. She is so sweet and gentle. I will be fine with having her just as a pasture pet if that is what is best for her. My daughter who is 15 has been riding since she was 7. Through her I have found my love horses.
 
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