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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Long story short, we have lots of hay left from last year, do you/would you feed it? We have two native types (though one is a baby so have no issues with weight control with him right now) and one appyxtb. I'm slightly worried about the reduced calorie/nutrional value of it as I know people feed it to their laminitic/native types.
Would it be best to sell it and buy new (would love to have large rectangle bales but the way our barn was built we can't get them in :( ) or to use it and supplement with haylage if needed?
If it makes a difference, I couldn't tell you what 'type' of hay it is beyond (presumably?) standard British meadow hay. I know the grasses in it are a varied mix but thats about it. Maybe I should pay more attention to it in retrospect.
 

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I think it really depends on your horse's specific needs and current conditions, as well as any supplemental feed (either hard feeds or quality pasture) they get for vitamins and minerals. For my prone-to-obesity very easy keepers, it might be a good choice. I think you're in the UK, so I'm not sure what your options are for sending the hay out for analysis, but for about $20US I just recently sent in a sample of last year's hay (which I bought as a bridge between spring and summer) and was very happy to see the results indicating it was very safe for my insulin resistant retired mare. Here's an example of the information in the report I get from this particular lab, so you have a sense of what you might look for: https://equi-analytical.com/resources/as-sampled-vs-dry-matter-results/
 

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after 6 months or so of being baled and cured hay loses very little nutritional value. I am still feeding last years hay and will feed it until it is gone
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
after 6 months or so of being baled and cured hay loses very little nutritional value. I am still feeding last years hay and will feed it until it is gone
It will have been about a year by now, we have a lot of welshies around here and often a fair few people who want to get some of last years so it may actually be worth selling it but it would be a bit of a hassle, if this is the case after a bit longer too then I'll stop worrying, I can always get them some haylage if they need anyway
 

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As long as it was stored inside and isn't moldy. I have about 35 big rounds from last year. That's what horses will be fed this coming winter.

Will put up another 30 or so bales this year. Always have a years worth ahead on hay. Been caught with only on Bale in barn going into cold months. We buy our hay from a hay supplier.

If bad hay season I don't have to worry how I'll feed my horses this winter. My horses eat year old hay most winter's. They do just fine.

No way no how would I sell hay I have in my barn now.
 

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As long as the hay is baled tightly then it is safe to feed, has lost no more nutritional value than hay 6 months old.
Dust, dirt, feces and moisture needs kept out of the bales or it is junk...
But would I feed it to my horses...you bet if it is clean yet.
Unless you watched your hay being baled, stacked on a cart and then in your barn...do you really know how old your hay is...any of it you are feeding?
I'm positive I've fed hay 3 years sitting in storage barns when there was a hay shortage...
My horses did fine with it and loved that hay actually...it still was fresh and green when the bales were opened and smelled nice yet too.

I would not "sell" your hay unless you positively have a guaranteed new supply waiting to go in the storage area and would not sell it for less than what you spent to purchase it...
:runninghorse2:...
 

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As long as it has been cured, baled and stored properly, no dust or mold I would keep it. I always keep last years good hay as I don't know what this year will be like, if it is a bad, wet haying season I am better off with last years hay than poor hay from this year.
 

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So, where I live, we get water in a "feast or famine" each year. It's a crap shoot. In the "feast" years, I buy hay cheap, and I buy extra because next year could be a "famine" year, and there may be only 1 cutting of hay and the price is astronomical. I store my hay on pallets in a covered barn, and put a tarp over the open door that gets sunshine (it has 3 bays and no doors) - it's high desert here, very arid, and the sun is murder. So, if you store hay properly, you can feed it next year. I always buy my hay from the same people who are actually my neighbors and I get to see them cut/cure/bale it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Having a temperate climate we're lucky to have fairly consistent hay yields yearly but I do get the point, definitely wouldn't sell it before getting any more in but probably won't, I think I'm just fussing for no reason, clearly got too much time on my hands!
 

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Having a temperate climate we're lucky to have fairly consistent hay yields yearly but I do get the point, definitely wouldn't sell it before getting any more in but probably won't, I think I'm just fussing for no reason, clearly got too much time on my hands!
As long as the hay has been properLy stored, it’s nutritional value is still good:)

I still have ~70 bales of last year’s hay and boy am I glad. The 2020 test hay I brought home was worthless and “worthless” is being kind.

Two bales of one hay went back because it was moist even with a drying agent on it.

One bale of the other two bales got eaten by one horse and not the other, but the second bale turned into smelly rotten white mold and had to be thrown out. If I would have bought 125 bales of that stuff ——- well —— the feed store would have gotten it back.

The guy is supposed to be doing second cut this week. I hope he didn’t cut yet because we have had so much humid moisture, this hay won’t be fit for winter storage either.

Feed your 2019 hay, there’s nothing wrong with it:):)
 
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