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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone contacted my barn owner about half leasing a horse. This person wants to trail ride once a week and just have some horsey time (grooming, etc.). What she doesn't want, apparently, is lessons. She says she owned horses for over 10 years. My barn owner is also the instructor and isn't interested in leasing a horse out without lessons, so she referred this person to me. I was thinking that either Moonshine or Pony might work for this person.

What I'm wondering is, what should I look for when/if I meet this person? How can I tell if she would be a good match for the horse, or a conscientious rider / lessor? I'm thinking to ask the barn owner to make her take one or two trial lessons to be sure that she knows what she's doing. I also understand the need for a contract. What else do I need to know?
 

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A contract drawn with very clearly defined limitations to what is permitted and what is not.
Cause the person rode 10 years ago...big deal.
I've seen trail riders who rode the legs off a animal, were very rough and aggressive riders and then saw those who rode with great care and thoughts of the horses abilities and limitations...you could have either.
Me, honestly... if I did not need the $ help so I could keep the animal "mine" the answer would be no.
Neither of your horses mind hanging out days off from work...
You might mind though having some of that time and work you put on each animal to have them ride as they do undone and that is a great possibility, regardless of what you see in a ring...
Out on trails, unseen could be a very different person emerge with your horse....yea, no.:frown_color:
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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1. What they ^^^^ both said - take it all to heart:)

2. I know a couple people who claimed they “had been riding for 30 years” and I would not put either one of them on any horse of mine.

3. Not “no but heck no” and “heck” is not the word I have in mind.
 

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The more I think about your instructor and B/O reaction is dead-on...


If the person is just looking to ride once a week on trails she can go to local hack barns and rent a horse...
Once she has been around a few times she will be allowed to do more with less supervision...they learn her and how she treats the animals and what she as a rider is capable of...
She wants grooming time, time to just be with........
I bet you there are rescues around who would love to have someone come and just love on and groom horses as well as riding for handicapped riders programs where her grooming skills could be put to great use...


If it were my horses, my answer would be no, my horses are not for lease or to be ridden by any other than their owners. Thank-you for inquiring but no.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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I've put too much time and training into my horses to make them what I want. I don't want to take the chance that Sally-on-the-Side will be too handsy, too rough, too timid, too green or too stupid and make more work for me to have to go back and fix any problems that she causes. No thanks.

-- Kai
 

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I'm glad some horse owners are willing to take a risk , instead of just a cart blanch 'heck no". if not, I'd never have been able to have 21 years of successful half leasing. 21 years , 8 different horses.


The owners knew to trust me because they watched me ride, once or twice. They heard me talk, saw me around the barn, read my references. I had signed contracts with some, not with others.


That said, I suggest you do have one that delinieates who pays for what, including injuries that might happen while riding.


I can proudly say that the worst injury I ever 'caused' to a horse was a stone bruise. But, I caught several colics, did my turn at hand walking, midnight check ups , etc. a good leassor can be of great benefit to both of you.
 

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I definitely think some supervised riding is in order and for you to meet the person. I'd at least do that because if you're thinking of sharing you need to expose yourself and get used to trialling people so YOU know what you want. Let's be real if this person refuses some lessons or supervision you have your answer right there. You can't just let anyone on. When I was open to shares in the first year a lady came saying she was VERY experienced. This woman didn't know how to put a saddle on, hold the reins and was just... so inexperienced. The instructor put her through her paces and it was a huge shock for this woman who thought a few backyard gallops were enough. You just can't take people at face value not when your babies rely on you <3
 

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I'm glad some horse owners are willing to take a risk , instead of just a cart blanch 'heck no". if not, I'd never have been able to have 21 years of successful half leasing. 21 years , 8 different horses.


The owners knew to trust me because they watched me ride, once or twice. They heard me talk, saw me around the barn, read my references. I had signed contracts with some, not with others.


That said, I suggest you do have one that delinieates who pays for what, including injuries that might happen while riding.


I can proudly say that the worst injury I ever 'caused' to a horse was a stone bruise. But, I caught several colics, did my turn at hand walking, midnight check ups , etc. a good leassor can be of great benefit to both of you.
I think you are the exception to the rule:)

At my age, I can say that I have only known five - FIVE - people I would trust on my horses, out of my sight, and one of those five was my son.

I am also one of those “neither a borrower nor lender be” people, lollol. If someone need help, I will operate my equipment to help but nothing leaves my driveway without me:):)
 

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Heck no is the correct answer. A big no.

Especially someone who is not from your barn, who you don't know already, and who doesn't want to lesson. There is no person in the world who is too good for lessons.

If some time down they road you do go into leasing, iron clad contracts that are approved by lawyers is a must. A must.

I would also suggest some kind of liability insurance, because hold harmless waivers sometimes won't hold up, and you want to have the money to take things to court if - god forbid - someone got hurt or killed on your horse. Accidents happen, you have to be ready when you're blamed for them.

Technically if you leased out, too, I'd consider selling the horse to an LLC in your name (you can do it for like, $5...) so that if a lawsuit came to be you could not be held liable for personal assets, but again, I'd get a lawyer.

The equine industry is a messy one, and just like car accidents/people slipping in stores or tripping places, everyone's looking for a lawsuit and some money.
Be careful. Be prepared for the absolute worst.

Or, honestly, just don't lease. Leave that to the professionals and enjoy your ponies yourself!
 

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I, for one, do not share well. I don't even want to share my manure fork. So my answer would be no. I can think of TWO people in my horse world that I would be willing to share either of my horses with.
 

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lol Same. I keep my forks locked in my trailer when I'm not around. The only person I can think of off the top of my head who I'd trust to ride my horse when I'm absent is R, and that's only because I know him very well and I trained one of his horses so he knows how to operate Dreams. When I still had Thunder, R had a standing invitation to come steal him whenever he wanted - but then Thunder was an exceptionally easy horse to ride, and had such an easygoing temperament that any idiot off the street could tack him up and take him for a spin with next to no risk of an incident. But Thunder was special - if R wanted to borrow Dreams tomorrow I'd be okay with that, but I'd want to know when he was riding and where he was going and I'd probably suggest he lunge him before climbing aboard. With Thunder I didn't even need to know he was getting stolen beforehand lol. He could just take him and go.

But, yeah, no one else. There are a small handful of folks I would trust to ride Dreams if I were there as well, but only R would be able to take him without me being present. But I will freely admit that I am very particular about people touching my horses and/or using my stuff.

-- Kai
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, she came out and groomed and rode Moonshine. I would say she's not the best rider, but she's quiet and calm and has gentle hands. Moonshine liked her just fine. She also brought a carrot and two apples for her, and has plans to get cookies. So I think Moonshine is going to like this arrangement. And, she really thinks she might just come out and groom her and not even ride, half the time. Afterwards, she had that "horse happy" aura about her. Having my own horses, and seeing them whenever I want, I had sort of forgotten how happy it can make us feel, just to be around them. It was nice to see someone else so happy from just spending time with a horse.

I wrote up a lease and sent it to her. She agreed to the price. So hopefully everything will work out.
 

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To protect you, too you’ll want her (her parents if she’s a minor) to sign a release of liability. Even she she is just grooming.
 
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