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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I gave my cousin (8 years old) a ride on Boomer. Now we are having a party and she wants to take a "Lesson" sort of thing. I'm good with kids and I'm good with horses but she cries really easy and when I am teaching some one to ride I can be very straight forward and tell them that they are doing it extremely wrong and show them what to do. I want to make horses a positive experience for her but I don't want her to walk away from them crying because I told her she didn't do it right.
 

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You make everything positive. At eight and just starting then all she needs is to be taught to sit in the centre of the saddle and how to hold the reins.
I believe it is vitally important that beginners learn to find their balance and confidence and you will never get that if you expect them to sit straight up and their heels jammed down.
Get her stopping and starting and if you give her a little trot get her to hold both reins in one hand and with the other to pull the front of the saddle off the horse's back so she isn't bouncing.

Any lessons you give should be positive rather than negative. Criticism should be positive and given in such a way as to be just a part of learning.

If you were to come home with homework and when it was checked over someone said that the writing was terrible and untidy you would soon get down. If on the other hand they were to say that it was some good work, well tried but it would be better if your writing was better, you would take that as positive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks :) I add positive notes to lessons when I give them but probably need to work on how I tell them they are doing it wrong. I think I might start with her just sitting on him with a hackamore while I have a halter and lead on him. Just getting her to ask him to walk stop and turn might be a good way to start?? I don't know.
 

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I put my kids on a saddle on a stand, then go through the various basics first, then put them on the horse...hopefully this will let her learn, make mistakes, without getting anyone hurt, physically or otherwise

good luck
 

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My brother is 5 and has been riding some for quite some time.
My biggest problem is he wants to go fast and so is always clicking/kicking horse in opposite direction. Round pen/ lunge line work great.
Basics first-look where you are going(if likes to look at ground tell them you will end up and ground and thats no fun)
push on saddle if grabbing with hands dont pull on saddle
to keep but pushed into seat tell the to squish the candy in the seat with her bum
-when they do something good asking horse to like turn or trot make sure they pet the horse and tell horse good job and she should enjoy that :)
-if having a hard time(of course after a few lessons) going into faster walk or trot to her to act like theres birthday cake in distance and get excited to go get it

Hopefully those help out. :)
 

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be carful with the "your doing it wrong". I work with LOTS of kids at a summer camp and I could tell every camper they are doing something "wrong" but why focus on what they are doing wrong focus on what they are doing right and keep teaching to fix the things they are doing "wrong". If they are doing something that is wrong and hard on their horse, then I will stop and explain the right way of doing...whatever it is.
I can't remember the last time I told a camper that they were doing it wrong. Teach what is right and just correct without saying they are wrong. Be encouraging of the effort. Remember there was a time when you weren't as good as you are now, and I am sure there are things that you might be doing that could be called "wrong". I teach my wrangler staff that when they are teaching the three things that are needed in riding class is they need to be FUN, SAFE, EDUCATIONAL and yes at camp I put them in order of important to camp. Others might put them in order of EDUCATIONAL, SAFE, EDUCATIONAL.
How do you want your lessons to be viewed?
 

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Sandwich it - I help my boss teach beginner lessons, often with small kids, and if there's something they need to improve (say, they need to keep their hands down while trotting), it'll usually go like this:

"Hey, that was great! Now, you see how he slowed down a little there? If you keep your hands down by his neck it won't pull on the bit in his mouth, and make him slow down. That was so good, did you enjoy that?" All in a very chirpy voice :p

Be encouraging, and explain why you're asking them to do something - they'll often improve a lot faster if they know the reason for doing something.
 

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"Hey, that was great! Now, you see how he slowed down a little there? If you keep your hands down by his neck it won't pull on the bit in his mouth, and make him slow down. That was so good, did you enjoy that?" All in a very chirpy voice :p
This is a great example of what I was saying you are letting them know that they did a good job, but there are some things that will make it better next time.

Be encouraging, and explain why you're asking them to do something - they'll often improve a lot faster if they know the reason for doing something.
This part is VERY important be encouraging and when correcting explaining why, I agree riders will improve much faster the better we encourage and the better we explain why we do what we do.
 

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This part is VERY important be encouraging and when correcting explaining why, I agree riders will improve much faster the better we encourage and the better we explain why we do what we do.
It seems to me that people imagine kids aren't on the same wavelengths as adults. They learn exactly the same way we do, by having it explained to us. I mean, how many times have we as adults, had someone say something over and over and over again and not understood it, then as soon as they say it differently or explain it somehow, the lightbulb goes off :lol:

I'm going through the same thing right now, being in the process of doing a degree. I definitely go to some lecturers more than others if I want a piece of work or some god-awful physiology concept explained to me :lol:
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks :) The party is coming up and I have been prepping Boo and myself. I gave a couple of "Lessons" to my sisters friend and they went pretty well. I will definately use these tips :)
 
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