The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright guys, i am having some colic problems.

it all started early on in 2013 when my friend lost her horse, Buddy to colic in February. About 2 weeks later we lost one of our beloved lesson horses Whiskey. From then till April we lost 4 more horses (so a total of 6) Then in May my best Friends horse coliced and we had to put him down as well as another horse on that same day. Then in june we lost another one, so now we are at 9. Then in August 2 of my friends horses coliced, but both made it through after getting surgery. Then in October i lost my horse, and now that i have my new horse, i am deathly afraid of loosing him. We had another horse colic last night and she had to have surgery and it is still unknown what is going to happen to her.

So my question is, what are your thoughts on all this. I know that this is not normal. And i dont know what to do about all of this. Is this a common thing? Should i change barns? Can the quality of the hay be causing this? Any thoughts?

Just some background information, I live in the foothills of colorado, where it is always very dry and according to my barn owner colic is a very common thing where i live but idk if i believe that. I am from New Jersey and i rode there for 5 years and until i moved to Colorado i'd never even heard of colic. Our barn is not the most upscale place, if you want your water buckets clean you do it yourself and if you want your horse to have supplements you feed it to them, yeah that kind of place.

All comment appreciated! Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,170 Posts
I can't really offer any advice, but that's a crazy amount of colic deaths. Are they all at one barn or in the same area?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,059 Posts
I'm no expert but what sort of colic are we talking about? Sand colic? Impaction colic?

If its sand, look at the feeding practices at the barn and if any preventatives are used, or could be added into your routine. ie. psyillium products.

If its impaction, make sure your horse has ready access to clean, quality water and look at salt products to encourage drinking adequate amounts. Check that the water itself is not saline or highly mineralized as this may be having an effect.

Other than that, wiser heads than mine need to weigh in.

Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,913 Posts
Not common and unacceptable. If the BO is saying it's a Colorado thing, shame on her. She's got her head in the sand. I've lived in the front range for 20 years and have never lost a horse to colic nor have I had one require surgery. I can count the incidences of colic I have had on one hand and they have all been resolved with a 1/2 dose of Banamine at most. I will agree that we do tend to have weather related episodes. Typically when a big front moves in you will have the highest % of them.

I'll stick my neck out and say it's a management issue. My place isn't upscale either. They are out 24/7 snow, rain, sun and wind. I know there isn't a ton of affordable options out there but I'd be looking.

What's your gut telling you on why all these horses coliced? Your gut is more often than not right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,047 Posts
What are the horses being fed? Pellets? Long Stem Grass hay? Moldy Hay? Alfalfa? You say if you want clean water buckets you best clean them yourself.. insufficient water intake can colic a horse just like that. Are the horses stalled? Are they out on a dry lot? How many hours a day are they eating hay? Horses need small amounts of feed frequently.. so hay nets and/or hay racks and hay in front of them all the time will do this. Think of a grazing horse. The horse eats a little almost continuously. That and clean water is how you avoid colic.

If the issue is sand, then figure a way to feed your horse off the ground and get something in your horse regularly to bind the sand up and get it to move along. And make sure fresh, clean, palatable water is available all the time. If it is very cold, warm the water some as there are horses who will drink more if the water is warm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,088 Posts
I live in an area that's always been considered to have higher than average colic cases (I don't know why, just what I've heard some vets say) but we've never, NEVER had that many cases and we're FAR from upscale. There is obviously something going on at the barn that needs to be looked at. Are the horses out a lot or stalled? Are they on sand or pasture and how good is the hay/grain? I would look into these things and also be on the lookout for a new barn if it was a viable option. That amount of colic is not coincidental....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
Sorry about he loss of your horse, how awful, that is a crazy amount of colic in just one year. I am in Florida with sugar sand 7 horses and have not had a colic in over 13 years. My horses eat off the ground, graze, during the day and we don't always have the best hay. I know they are ingesting sand, but they are getting what they need to push the sand through.

I would look at management practices. Is clean water always available, are the horses getting enough long stem forage, are they turned out and able to roam around and move enough, what else is being fed ect.. As for your new horse I would make sure he is getting what he needs even if you have to do it yourself. I feed beet pulp as part of my forage, since you have to soak it the horse is getting some extra water into their gut, it helps to keep things moving through the gut, sand for example, and will help prevent blockages. It is also relatively inexpensive. Make sure your horse is getting plenty of long stem forage and his teeth are in good shape so he chews properly. If you need to add some salt to his feed to encourage him to drink more then do that too. I would absolutely minimize the risk to your horse.

What does the vet have to say about all the colic. Certainly if the incidence of colic is that high in the area the vet would have something to say about it. Good luck to you and your horse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What are the horses being fed? Pellets? Long Stem Grass hay? Moldy Hay? Alfalfa? You say if you want clean water buckets you best clean them yourself.. insufficient water intake can colic a horse just like that. Are the horses stalled? Are they out on a dry lot? How many hours a day are they eating hay? Horses need small amounts of feed frequently.. so hay nets and/or hay racks and hay in front of them all the time will do this. Think of a grazing horse. The horse eats a little almost continuously. That and clean water is how you avoid colic.

If the issue is sand, then figure a way to feed your horse off the ground and get something in your horse regularly to bind the sand up and get it to move along. And make sure fresh, clean, palatable water is available all the time. If it is very cold, warm the water some as there are horses who will drink more if the water is warm.
all the horse have been being fed different things, most have been on alfalfa and pellets. Both our hay and pellets are not high quality though. I clean my water buckets every other day. My horse is in a stall and i know that every horse in the barn has access to water at all times. 7 out of the 13 have had some form of sand colic. my horse did not, my horse was dehydrated, and when he was supposed to go to turnout the turnout guy knew something was up but he didnt say anything till a few hours later when he was down in his stall and wouldn't get up
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,653 Posts
How much turnout time do these horses get? They need to be able to move and well be horses. Something is seriously wrong to lose that many horses to colic.

In the 35 years iv owned horses iv only lost one to colic he twisted his gut,by the time it was discovered it was to late. His gums had turned blue and hauling to the u wasnt an option would of never lived through the 4 hour trailer ride.

We never did find out why he coliced so bad but it went from mild colic to severe in an hours time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
Feeding flax seed or something with psylium (think sandclear) on a schedule should help if its sand colic. We had three horses colic one after another a few years ago from sand colic when it was extremely dry and they all lived on dry lots. Two died. We started adding pyslium and so far haven't had any more sand related deaths or colics.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top