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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi so I am looking at a few weanlings and trying to pick the best one for purchase. I am okay-ish at conformation on an adult, but really lacking in the younger horse department. I know as they age the butts and pasterns come down. These are just some ranch bred horses that I was looking at. From my understanding they just brought them in off of 500 acres to wean them from their moms and took some pictures. I think they also brought in their cows too.
 

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Not an expert in conformation, but they're cute looking at least.

Nice silver dapple coloring too. What breed are they? What state is the ranch in?

Because I'm not sure that the Quarter Horse has the silver gene, but Morgan's are one of the breeds that do and they were once upon a time used quite prominently as ranch horses. Especially in California.
 

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These are some Hancock bred quarter horses. I think there are 2 lines that carry the silver dapple gene. These are either silver black or blue roan silver.
You're right, just did some googling and came across this guy. Rare Silver Gene | AQHA Stallion | Hancocks Silver Boy

So there definitely are silver dapple Quarter horses and the Hancock line is one bloodline that produces them. Perhaps this shouldn't be so surprising, Morgans are known to have influenced the Quarter Horse ((Quite extensively it turns out! http://creamridgemorgans.com/documents/justinmorgan_contribution_qh.pdf & http://creamridgemorgans.com/documents/MorganQuarterHorseconnection.pdf )) and ol' Joe Hancock himself is rumored to have had Morgan in his background ((Alongside the infamous Percheron)).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In their pedigree its from Bar U Champ Binder the breeder just got a mare from that line and bred with their hancock stock.
https://www.allbreedpedigree.com/bar+u+champ+binder

The other line is easier to trace and it goes all the way back to a stud that was a stud for both Morgans and quarter horses.
https://www.allbreedpedigree.com/ms+barbarella


https://www.silverequine.org/american-quarter-horse.html

I find it all very interesting. A little disappointing that the quarters dont seem to express it very cleanly. The babies I have pictures of look pretty sharp but it fades as a adults a bit it seems.
 

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In their pedigree its from Bar U Champ Binder the breeder just got a mare from that line and bred with their hancock stock.
https://www.allbreedpedigree.com/bar+u+champ+binder

The other line is easier to trace and it goes all the way back to a stud that was a stud for both Morgans and quarter horses.
https://www.allbreedpedigree.com/ms+barbarella


https://www.silverequine.org/american-quarter-horse.html

I find it all very interesting. A little disappointing that the quarters dont seem to express it very cleanly. The babies I have pictures of look pretty sharp but it fades as a adults a bit it seems.
That all is very interesting, is this ranch specifically breeding for silver dapple horse then? Breeding for color ((In addition to longevity, soundness, no genetic disorders, good conformation, etc and so forth)) has become increasingly common in the last decade in the horse breeding world it seems.

Can't say that I blame any breeder looking to wrap their horses in a pretty color. The public loves color and with the horse market being what it is, anything that adds value to potential foals would be seriously looked at by any business-person.

Especially since these are fillies.

Since geldings are the traditional working ranch horses out west --Particularly among the Buckaroo sub-culture of the Cowboy it seems-- mares aren't usually used for riding on the big ranches. Some ranches even forbid mares altogether! Mares are used as broodmares almost exclusively and only so many fillies are needed each year to replace their aging mothers, so plenty of fillies end up as surplus that needs to be sold.

Not that no mares are ever ridden on some of the west's largest cattle ranches, but the tradition seems to hold strong in some regions of the US even today.

That's what I assume is the case with these fillies anyway.
 

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They are all just too stinking cute! Sorry I'm not a lot of help, but they all look similar and I would be interested in their personalities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am not exactly sure how they got start on the silvers. The impression I got is that they have had the silvers for a while without knowing, then it became a known thing. Then they started producing several in the past 10 years or so. They do seem like a typical ranch and the mares are just broodmares, the owner is older. They have some geldings and stud colts for sale too. I just have a preference for mares.

I was planning to ride the filly I buy so I was hoping to get whichever one had the best conformation, which is why I was asking here for some feedback.
 

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They're all very similar. What's jumping out to me is that all three look like they may be back at the knee, which is quite a flaw in a saddle horse-- it may just be winter fuzzies, but worth looking at closely. Are they all by the same sire? Maybe ask for photos of the dams, and choose the one that came from the best dam conformationally/temperament-wise. Hopefully the ranch broke all their mares to ride, even if they don't use them a lot. It really tells you a lot about that dam's temperament and what she will produce. If one mare sticks out as being the best-built and they said she is easy to handle and work with, that's the foal I would choose. If I had to pick off these photos, I would go for filly #1 or #3. If #1 isn't back at the knee and doesn't always stand with a foreleg extended, I would go for her. If she is, go for #3. #2 isn't as well-balanced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
They're all very similar. What's jumping out to me is that all three look like they may be back at the knee, which is quite a flaw in a saddle horse-- it may just be winter fuzzies, but worth looking at closely. Are they all by the same sire? Maybe ask for photos of the dams, and choose the one that came from the best dam conformationally/temperament-wise.
They are out of the same sire, I think. The third one they have listed as a different sire but he doesn't have silver so I think it might be a typo. I have asked about that but I havent gotten a response yet. I am attaching some younger less fuzzy pictures if it is easier to tell if they are all back at the knee still.



They have pictures of the dams I can get those in a second and attach those. I was hoping to get a better ranking and narrow it down a bit before asking about dam personality again. I think I overloaded him with questions earlier and he got to the questions I asked last.
 

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Hopefully the ranch broke all their mares to ride, even if they don't use them a lot. It really tells you a lot about that dam's temperament and what she will produce.
If this is a large working cattle ranch like I think it is, that's pretty unlikely. The mares on those sorts of places are usually judged going off of their ((Male)) relatives --Sires, Grandsires, brothers, sons, ect-- characteristics and temperaments, not on what their own abilities are. Frankly it would be impressive if the broodmares are even halter broken.

I'm really not kidding when I say that mares in a ranch situation where geldings are the preferred work horses aren't valued highly. Their handled basically like cattle:- Only handled once or twice a year at the very most, run into chutes and stocks to be vaccinated or doctored ((Hoof trimming for breeding stock is basically unheard of)), turned out into large pastures during spring with a dozen other mares and a stallion to foal and then be re-bred, nursing their foals throughout the summer, having their foals weaned abruptly come fall and then turned out into a large pasture with every other mare on the ranch to wait out the winter.

Now repeat that for the mares entire reproductive life, up until they can't produce anymore and are hauled off to the nearest auction house to be sold. These ranches are not breeding for pleasure, but for working animals and to make money off of their excess stock and culls. They don't handle their breeding stock more then the bare minimum because they don't see it as worth their time or money.
 

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^ Not always. Some of the best ranches have realized that the dam contributes a lot to the foal, and break all of their mares to ride-- not only so they can weed out the ones that are problematic, but so the mares have a chance at a career if they don't produce well. It's really not that hard to put 30 days on a mare and teach her the basics, and if she's not trainable, then there's no way I'd breed her. Thankfully, a lot of ranches are now getting out of the dark ages and realizing that, too. As more ranches downsize and try to breed better horses that sell for higher prices, rather than just quantity and hope they get some good ones in the bunch, riding the mares is more and more common and they have to prove themselves under saddle and/or in the show pen, too.
 

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^ Not always. Some of the best ranches have realized that the dam contributes a lot to the foal, and break all of their mares to ride-- not only so they can weed out the ones that are problematic, but so the mares have a chance at a career if they don't produce well. It's really not that hard to put 30 days on a mare and teach her the basics, and if she's not trainable, then there's no way I'd breed her. Thankfully, a lot of ranches are now getting out of the dark ages and realizing that, too. As more ranches downsize and try to breed better horses that sell for higher prices, rather than just quantity and hope they get some good ones in the bunch, riding the mares is more and more common and they have to prove themselves under saddle and/or in the show pen, too.
Maybe on the King Ranch or the 6666 Ranch in Texas. Lol, but that's not really likely on say "Uncle Earl's Ranch" in Nevada.
 
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