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Discussion Starter #21
We are at a bit of a disadvantage. We are a bit spoiled. We have the ability to feed pre-bagged feeds up here. They are all made up and balanced with protein/fat and vitamin/mineral ratios clearly marked for us. Do you have something similar to that or do you feed raw materials?

Corn is typically thought to be a very hot feed with a high NSC ratio.
i think it exists here, but its imported, and will break my bank account too much to start with that. I've looked into it but its something id rather leave as a last resort. of course if its necessary i will do it, but another cheaper way would be very nice lol. Its also not something people regularly use here, apart from maybe at sporthorse breeders (for the mares) and professional riders. They dont seem to have a lot of variants either, ive just found a basic one, a broodmare one, a foal one and one for racehorses. The basic one is for horses in 'light work' and 'young horses that are just starting training' so it doesnt really sound like it would help that much with weight gain on a 'senior' horse (he's 19, not really senior but getting up there) that gets ridden daily and jumps twice a week (low jumps, but still)
@cbar ill look into beet pulp! no idea if thats used to feed horses here or if you can even get it. I'll try to find out whats it called in spanish first :p
 

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Discussion Starter #23
You need protein, fat and balanced vitamins and minerals. That gets complicated with raw materials.
I agree, but on the other hand, balanced feeds are quite a new thing, so people must have fed horses something all those years right? ;) I'll ask my vet to see whats available and recommended here for weight gain :)
 

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Yes, but up until recently horses did not live anywhere near as long and were not pets. If they were not thriving, they were passed on and were often considered elderly at 12-15. They did not have the tooth care, veterinary care and would die without antibiotics. We have moved beyond that.

Making balanced feed with raw material is possible, but more serious math is required.
 

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Yes, but up until recently horses did not live anywhere near as long and were not pets. If they were not thriving, they were passed on and were often considered elderly at 12-15. They did not have the tooth care, veterinary care and would die without antibiotics. We have moved beyond that.

Making balanced feed with raw material is possible, but more serious math is required.
I know, i was half-joking. What I meant is that we have high-performing horses here, at my barn and around where I live, without feeding balanced feed. They are not thin or showing signs of malnourishment (though they might be missing minerals etc, i havent actually tested them, but they look healthy and perform well), so there must be a local formula for nutrition that works! I will ask my vet and report back here :D
 

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A computer program is normally recommended to figure it out. Type In Raw materials available and it tells you what to feed.

Soy can be a good option. Pea. Oats. But ca/phos balance needs to be considered.
 

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feeding a type of cut-up corn, soaked and drained, to get his weight up. According to her those would be cold calories (which i'm not sure i believe!). My trainer and i think its better to avoid hot calories as it makes him really hard to ride,...
I would ask the vet before changing his diet like that as well of course
Hi, I think you are very correct to be cynical about that! It is about the 'hottest' feed you can get! I wouldn't feed corn at all, unless there were absolutely no alternative & only if the horse was in very hard work. It is a 'high octane', very high sugar/starch grain, which unless well processed(cooked for eg) is also extra hard for the horse to digest. I wouldn't just be worried about excess energy making him hard to ride, but health - gut problems, laminitis, etc. High NSC 'hot' feeds such as grain, due to causing gut upsets, can actually cause horses to waste away - lose more weight, esp if you're feeding a lot.

**NB 'hot' feeds, even grain such as corn which is ultra high, is not *necessarily* problematic, but it does need to be fed very carefully, to avoid those issues. If your horse is stabled 24/7, already has a problem keeping condition - so highly likely a gut prob already, something like corn would make further problems more likely/risky.

And why I quoted your bit about asking a vet - never a bad idea, but may be better to find an equine nutritionist to consult, as unless the vet has made a point of specialising or learning extensively about the subject, they may not be very knowledgeable about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
And why I quoted your bit about asking a vet - never a bad idea, but may be better to find an equine nutritionist to consult, as unless the vet has made a point of specialising or learning extensively about the subject, they may not be very knowledgeable about it.
This is a good point, and the main reason I'm trying to do my own research as well to be in a position to ask the right questions and not just blindly follow vets orders. I've googled for equine nutritionists and the only one that comes up is an actual feed company (the same importing the feed I mentioned above) so that might be a biased party? Not sure how helpful they would be, at least in finding solutions that dont involve breaking the bank. I guess I might be able to consult someone remotely, but then we're back to the issue of the advice possibly not being area-specific :/

Either way I'm not dead-set on making anymore changes to his feed right away as he is gaining weight and getting more energy just with the extra alfalfa, but just looking into options!

I did some research on beetpulp, and have found extensive information on it in spanish, but most of those pages seem to be from either Spain or Mexico, and there is no Argentina-specific information, and I havent been able to find anyone selling it among the online people selling different types of horse feeds... Might not be a thing here, but again, I'll ask my vet.

Vet's supposed to come out tomorrow or saturday for vaccinations, so hopefully I can ask her then!
 
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i think it exists here, but its imported, and will break my bank account too much to start with that. I've looked into it but its something id rather leave as a last resort. of course if its necessary i will do it, but another cheaper way would be very nice lol. Its also not something people regularly use here, apart from maybe at sporthorse breeders (for the mares) and professional riders. They dont seem to have a lot of variants either, ive just found a basic one, a broodmare one, a foal one and one for racehorses. The basic one is for horses in 'light work' and 'young horses that are just starting training' so it doesnt really sound like it would help that much with weight gain on a 'senior' horse (he's 19, not really senior but getting up there) that gets ridden daily and jumps twice a week (low jumps, but still)
@cbar ill look into beet pulp! no idea if thats used to feed horses here or if you can even get it. I'll try to find out whats it called in spanish first :p
It's the by-product of the sugar beet after getting the sugar out if that helps you.

Definitely a good option and I'm also a little skeptical on the corn.
 

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My experience with the equine nutritionist was actually very productive. Yes, they do have a vested interest in you using their product but she was very straight forward about what thought the animal I called about needed, looked at what we had tried in the past, considered pasture conditions and the co-op report for the hay we were feeding and made her recommendations. As in, your horse needs this percent protein, this percent fat, this type of fiber and specific mineral recommendations for our area and our specific situation. Then she gave us a list of the products they carry that would meet our needs. It was easy to look for alternatives from other suppliers and instead of a complete product we went with separate sources and mixed our own. It is worth a try if they are willing to come out. This dealer also provided us with samples and coupons/rebates. Some of which we used; others that we did not.
 

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@QtrBel thats good to hear! Might be worth a shot then :D

I took a picture today, maybe not the best angle, but his ribs are a lot more padded, as is his butt (the bone is not sticking out so much on top!) So I'm seeing progress at least, even if he still needs to fill up behind the wither, and the rest of his butt/hips.
 

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Hey guys,

He's been getting extra hay since i ztarted this thread and is slowly (slowwwly..) improving. His energy is back to his normal hyper, slightly spooky, self at least! Happy to see him be cheeky again. I had attributed it to the heat in summer, but i now see that him being thin and losing weight probably played a role in that as well.

Anyway, i just wanted to hear some opinions. Someone whose opinion i value (her horse looks great and is the best cared for at the barn, and she has loads of experience) told me about the option of feeding a type of cut-up corn, soaked and drained, to get his weight up. According to her those would be cold calories (which i'm not sure i believe!). My trainer and i think its better to avoid hot calories as it makes him really hard to ride, and he needs to work 3 times harder to get the excess energy off, which isnt ideal for a horse thats getting up there in age obviously. He's unfortunately stalled 24/7 as there is no turnout at my barn (in the city :( )

Has anyone fed cornflour before? I was reading up on it and keep seeing things about high-energy, makes horse nervous, and can cause colic... so im pretty sure its not a route i want to go with him for now. I would ask the vet before changing his diet like that as well of course, just hoping to hear some opinions from people who have used it to see if its even worth considering!
Corn is hot calories.No, do not feed it! You can also feed soaked beet pulp, which has a calorie value higher then forage, but is digested like a forage, so has none of the associated risks of feeding hot calories, directly in proportion to amount fed (mood highs, colic laminitis)
If you want to feed cool calories, you feed fats, like flax and canola oil
 
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