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Oops. I forgot to actually post.
Okay, so the thing is I switched barns and we just decided to use that farrier because it would be much much easier. So we had him shod and the farrier kept putting his shoes on too far back so Jesse kept ripping them off so we decided he would be fine barefoot. (it would be much easier than explaining that he oversteps. Anyway. A little while ago I noticed his feet
were really long and were cracking. Apparently the fArrier said he was fine and that
he could wait another 6 weeks. That's 12 weeks! I told my mom this so she left a note on the board saying that even if the farrier says he can go longer that he should still do them.
The thing is that when Jesse's feet get long they crack (big time) and his feet get sore and he trips.
Just ranting hehe.
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Did you TELL your farrier he oversteps? It sounds like you didn't. That's not the farriers fault then.

As for 12 weeks in between- yes some of my horses have gone that long. My farrier was in a motorcycle accident and we had to scramble to find a replacement. It took over 3 months to find someone. No one went lame, no one was grossly overgrown. In my area a lot of people don't even trim over winter, I usually trim in November and then again they get trimmed in March, then every 6-8 weeks until November again. We don't ride during that time because its so nasty out and cold, and too much ice. If I had an indoor arena (I wish!) that would be different, but they simply don't grow very fast in winter.

Its not the matter of how long, its a matter of how his hooves hold up.
 

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Farriers know what over-reaching is, and will correct their shoeing for it, and it's fairly easy to explain - I guess I'm very confused as to why you wouldn't just say "he over-reaches, you can't leave a heel on the shoe"?
Bell boots can help prevent a horse from ripping shoes off, but it won't guarantee it.
 

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my horse over-reaches...and she has some heel on her shoe,but that's because she needs correctional shoeing kinds thing.
Maybe tell him he over-reaches?
If you decide to look for a new one,good luck :)
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I must have missed something. You are a new client to this farrier and you have not been at the barn so you can tell the farrier your horses history and specific needs?

Make the time to be there when the farrier is there and explain that your horse over reaches. The farrier might even want to see the horse move. I also suggest apologizing for not communicating with him/her more clearly to start with.

Dealing with your farrier is like everything else in life. Communication is the key! Farriers can not read minds.

And as JDI suggested, buy yourself a couple of pairs of bell boots.
 

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Actually the term is "forging". A new farrier, at least a good one, will watch a horse move before starting his work. How can a blacksmith know how to properly trim a horse without knowing how he/she moves and what the horse's job is?
 

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Actually the term is "forging". A new farrier, at least a good one, will watch a horse move before starting his work. How can a blacksmith know how to properly trim a horse without knowing how he/she moves and what the horse's job is?
This was my thought too.

It would not surprise me that the BO/BM, or whoever takes the horses out of their stalls for the farrier, does not want to be bothered to do that part and just tells the farrier to trim them.
 

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Actually the term is "forging". A new farrier, at least a good one, will watch a horse move before starting his work. How can a blacksmith know how to properly trim a horse without knowing how he/she moves and what the horse's job is?

My farrier spent a long time assessing Hunter before she even touched his hooves. He had a lot of problems due to poor trims and she has corrected them all. A good farrier is so important. So glad I found one
 

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It's a good idea to always be there when you horse's feet are being trimmed/shod. It's easy when you are boarding to slack off this responsibility, but you miss out on both being able to accurately pass on important information to your farrier (like the fact your horse over-reaches) as well as miss out on any important details about the trim or things your farrier can teach you about your horses feet. BO's are busy and don't always make this communication a priority - nor is it their responsibility to. Make a point to always be attending your own horse for ANY farrier or vet appointment.
 

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Great post by Indy.

If there was absolutely no problem with the horse's feet, I wouldn't necessarily feel the need to be at the appointment. BUT since you are having isssues, a direct conversation with the farrier is critical.

Farrier day at a boarding barn is a busy, confusing day with lots going on. VERY easy for the BO/BM to neglect to tell the farrier some piece of into or for the farrier to just shoe the next horse brought to him without question.
 

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It's a good idea to always be there when you horse's feet are being trimmed/shod. It's easy when you are boarding to slack off this responsibility, but you miss out on both being able to accurately pass on important information to your farrier (like the fact your horse over-reaches) as well as miss out on any important details about the trim or things your farrier can teach you about your horses feet. BO's are busy and don't always make this communication a priority - nor is it their responsibility to. Make a point to always be attending your own horse for ANY farrier or vet appointment.
Bingo!
 

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Make a point to always be attending your own horse for ANY farrier or vet appointment.
Yep, I have a huge pet peve on people who don't and think they have a bad farrier because of it.... its your fault not his. I work and go to school and still call time off to be there at the appointment. I'm always an hour early and don't expect to be out of the barn by the end of the day lol.
 

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It's a good idea to always be there when you horse's feet are being trimmed/shod. It's easy when you are boarding to slack off this responsibility, but you miss out on both being able to accurately pass on important information to your farrier (like the fact your horse over-reaches) as well as miss out on any important details about the trim or things your farrier can teach you about your horses feet. BO's are busy and don't always make this communication a priority - nor is it their responsibility to. Make a point to always be attending your own horse for ANY farrier or vet appointment.
Can't agree more. You are the one who knows your horse the best to tell farrier about (potential) issues. Or if you absolutely can't make an appointment (things happen) explain the farrier on a phone what you want and what are your concerns as well as to your BO (from my experience good BO will take it into account).

However I also agree with iride - good farrier will always evaluate how the horse moves (especially the new horse) before doing the job. And frankly while I've seen horses, who didn't need trim for 3-4 months on regular basis those were exceptions, most still need to be trimmed at 6-8 weeks schedule (often depending on time of year).
 

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Actually the term is "forging". A new farrier, at least a good one, will watch a horse move before starting his work. How can a blacksmith know how to properly trim a horse without knowing how he/she moves and what the horse's job is?
Sorry - must correct.

When a horse hits the bottom of a front hoof with a rear toe it is called forging.

Over reaching is when the toe hits the pastern or fetlock.
 

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It's a good idea to always be there when you horse's feet are being trimmed/shod. It's easy when you are boarding to slack off this responsibility, but you miss out on both being able to accurately pass on important information to your farrier (like the fact your horse over-reaches) as well as miss out on any important details about the trim or things your farrier can teach you about your horses feet. BO's are busy and don't always make this communication a priority - nor is it their responsibility to. Make a point to always be attending your own horse for ANY farrier or vet appointment.
I am going to partly disagree here.

The majority of my boarders have never met their farrier. They choose to use the barn farrier and he comes every other Tuesday morning.

Our farrier will watch a horse move prior to even picking up a hoof. He introduces himself to the horse, looks him over and then starts his job.

Too many newbie horse owners out there think they should tell the farrier (and vet, trainer, barn owner, etc) how to correctly care for their horse. There are cases when information needs to be communicated but a good farrier can access the situation and adjust accordingly.

In fact our farrier perfers several of the owners to NOT be there. When "Pookie" acts up, owner says 'no no' and Pookie proceeds to become more naughty. BO growls QUIT and Pookie does so - RFN. At $35 a trim, it's so not worth an idiot horse hurting my wonderful farrier.
 

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I am going to partly disagree here.

The majority of my boarders have never met their farrier. They choose to use the barn farrier and he comes every other Tuesday morning.

Our farrier will watch a horse move prior to even picking up a hoof. He introduces himself to the horse, looks him over and then starts his job.

Too many newbie horse owners out there think they should tell the farrier (and vet, trainer, barn owner, etc) how to correctly care for their horse. There are cases when information needs to be communicated but a good farrier can access the situation and adjust accordingly.

In fact our farrier perfers several of the owners to NOT be there. When "Pookie" acts up, owner says 'no no' and Pookie proceeds to become more naughty. BO growls QUIT and Pookie does so - RFN. At $35 a trim, it's so not worth an idiot horse hurting my wonderful farrier.
Oh I get your point and agree - to an extent. In a perfect world horse owners should know what proper farrier work looks like, and know when to leave the work to the professionals. Too many people "giving orders" to either farrier or vet, when said orders are not in the horses best interest - can certainly be a huge headache if you are a BO, no doubt!

But I assume (I know, me being the optimist here) that most people on this board are either relatively well educated about proper care for their horses or are at least trying to LEARN - and this is why I specified your farrier can teach you much about your horses feet, as well - kinda hard to learn when you are banned from the barn while the farrier worked on your horse.

From my personal standpoint, I would never, ever permit a farrier to work on my horse if he had problems with me observing - but then again my horses must behave for the farrier or face consequences for it as well - especially as these days my horses' farrier is me!
 

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Sorry - must correct.

When a horse hits the bottom of a front hoof with a rear toe it is called forging.

Over reaching is when the toe hits the pastern or fetlock.
Which is what I thought the OP was describing since her horse was loosing shoes due to the condition.
 

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Which is what I thought the OP was describing since her horse was loosing shoes due to the condition.
It was my understanding that a lot of times, a horse will catch the heel of the shoe (over-reach, perhaps clip the heel bulb or pastern before sliding down and catching the shoe) that rips the shoe off?
 
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