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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so the BO said my horse needed his hooves trimmed...apparently they did but I didn't know because I thought they only needed done every 6 weeks and it hasn't been 6 weeks yet...but whatever. Anyway, I rode wednesday, she said the farrier was coming out so she'd have him do mine's hooves while he was there (he's done them before), I go out friday and get him out of the pasture and he's about falling over himself! My heart about jumped out of my throat watching him walk, I couldn't figure out what was wrong with him. I thought maybe he had gone blind, he was stepping real high with his front legs, but then he wasn't walking straight either, I thought 'jeezus he's got a neurological problem!' Well, there was another woman at the barn who saw how he was walking and said 'are his feet sore?' I don't know, I couldn't very well ask him. But he was ok on the grass between the pasture and the barn. But once in the aisle, he was walking weird again. She said his feet were sore, that probably something the farrier had done had made his feet hurt. Sure enough, on soft ground he was ok but the compacted dirt and the hard aisle he was limping and refusing to move foward and such. So I'm wondering, should I be mad? Is this a common thing? Would there have been a reason for him to 'over trim' his hooves and it be unavoidable that he was sore?
 

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Its common if its a horses first time being shod, or the first time being shod for the season. However, I would say a horse should NOT be ouchy on hard ground from a normal trim. Ice had his feet done yesterday, he even had the tip of his frog cut out all the way to the white because he had thrush, but he wasn't lame on it.
 

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No - your horse should not be sore due to a trim. I would be furious if my horse was ever sore due to a farrier.

Have you picked up the hooves to look at the bottom? Anything there look obviously wrong? Maybe ask a another horseperson to take a look and see if they see anything.
 

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Oh my gosh. I don't think that's common except like in corrective trimming and things along those lines. Is he in shoes, or is it the sole that is to thin or what? Have you checked them? Were you there when he was getting trimmed? I think I would be mad!! but I guess you should check it out and see what is actually wrong.

It sounds like maybe he shaved the sole too thin.
 

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I would be mad at your farrier, especially if you're not absolutely certain that's the problem. Usually horses with sore feet will appear to be stiff-legged, and limp when they hit a rock. I'm wondering about the horse picking the feet up higher than normal, that doesn't seem to fit with a foot-sore horse, to me.
I would keep an eye on it tomorrow and maybe give some bute if he's still sore, and call a farrier you trust to come out and give you their opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I had two other boarders look at his feet that night and they said something to the effect of him trimming too much off - the sole maybe I don't remember. They both said a couple things, I'm all new to this stuff. In any case the one woman gave me some turpentine solution and told me to put it on the bottoms of his hooves to help 'harden them up' and I kept him in a stall (with bedding) overnight. I'm not using him again and that's the end of it. I was thinking I should switch to someone else because I've never seen or heard of that happening before. There are two other farriers that come to the barn so I will speak to one of them about doing him next time.
To answer an earlier question, he has been trimmed before...been barefoot since I got him (about 4 months ago) and had no problems. He DID have a chip it the front of one hoof which this farrier told me was cosmetic and would probably come out in the next trim (this one) so my only rationality is that he HAD to trim them shorter to 'fix' the chip??? I don't know but I'm mad just the same! DON'T HURT MY HORSE!!!
 

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Does he have shoes, that were reset? If so, you need to have a farrier come out and remove and reset (if they can be)...

If he doesn't have shoes, the farrier may have trimmed too close to the sole, or got his angles messed up, which would make him feel weird on harder surfaces.
 

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Yes the farrier probably did wrong. But you should also have been there to make sure things were going correctly. If you are new to it, have someone who knows horses come explain things and make sure your horse is being treated properly. Get a well recommended from your barn or vet and chalk it up to a learning experience.
Poor Pony :( Sucks that it happened.
 

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I woiuld be po-ed too. I would definitely find a new trimmer/farrier. I'd also call the farrier who trimmed him and inform the farrier on just how lame your horse is in both front feet. Ask him if there was a reason he cut him so short. Tell your barn owner or trainer what happened, and tell him/her that you don't want that farrier to touch your horse again...

I trim my horses every 3-5 weeks, depending on the horse. I do it myself because of bad experience with farriers in my area.
 

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Going shorter to get rid of the chip! Wow! That sounds scary. I'm sorry to hear your horse is sore! Probably your farrier trimmed too short and touched the sensitive tissues. Turpentine indeed helps to harden the hoof (I used it for while), but it doesn't do a magic (unfortunately).

If you'd take some pics of the hoofs I'm sure number of people could tell if they look too short trimmed.
 

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Sounds like he removed way too much sole. Barefoot horses need their soles left intact, no cutting down to live sole or they will be sore for days. I would be livid. He's trimmed him to be shod. If you can give him a small amount of bute and keep him on soft ground. You can also use boots with pads to help him on hard surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
tried to take some pictures today, the one of the bottom came out really blurry though. It was hard to hold his hoof up, bent over, and take a picture with my camera phone. He was better today but still 'ouchy' as the other girl said. I rode him in the pasture, on the grass and mostly just walking. He would trot but a little stiff on the front legs and I felt bad cuz you could tell it was uncomfortable so I didn't make him. Put some more turpentine on it when I was done riding.
It is the BO's farrier, SHE was there when he got his feet done. She said he probably just got sore because he has white hooves and the grass was dewey the night after his feet were done

 

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That one pic is blurry, but if I am seeing what I think I'm seeing - he trimmed sole which could lead to soreness in a barefoot horse. A friend of mine's farrier constantly did that and so she though it was normal for a horse to be sore after a trim. Different farrier - no more soreness after trims. What some farriers tend to do is trim a barefoot horse just like they do a shod horse, which doesn't always work.
 

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LOL White feet are the same as black feet.. Old wives tale on the softness/hardness thereof. Looks like a decent trim other than the tell tale white around the inside of the whiteline. This means he either scraped it out or used a tool to remove some of the dry/hard sole. That is what a farrier did to mine while "trying" to do what I asked, which was do not remove sole. She did it with a rasp. I had another farrier who would snag it with her nippers and scrape off/out the dry sole. So.. basically your horse will be tender for a bit. Just tell the farrier to NEVER remove any sole and YOU be there to insure it. :)
 

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I agree with other people, sole was definitely trimmed. But other then that it looks like a decent trim to me, actually. I'd just give your horse a break for several days, and he should be OK.

BTW, I'm not positive farriers trim the sole for the shoes. I guess it depends on hoof/farrier. When I took a class on trimming/shoeing the guy just touched the sole, but didn't really trim it even though he was putting shoes on.
 

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Ok so the BO said my horse needed his hooves trimmed...apparently they did but I didn't know because I thought they only needed done every 6 weeks and it hasn't been 6 weeks yet...but whatever..... So I'm wondering, should I be mad? Is this a common thing? Would there have been a reason for him to 'over trim' his hooves and it be unavoidable that he was sore?
Every horse is different. Some need to be trimmed every 4 weeks, some can go 8 weeks or longer, and a lot depends on how much you ride and over what type of surface.

Taking off too much from the toe or the heel, or too much sole is not at all uncommon in my experience, and any of those can make your horse sore for a couple weeks.

Should you be upset, yes.....of course, but my advice is not to necessarily change farriers, but to become more involved with understanding the needs of your horse and discuss/work with your farrier/trimmer and not just accept what your BO or even your farrier says/does if it doesn't work for your horse.

After all the talk about angles, rollover, etc. and various trimming methods and philosophies (of which there are many), the bottom line is that your horse needs its feet to be comfortable in order to work, and your horse should be able to work every single day.

Our lead mare is thin soled and if she is trimmed too short in the toe or has sole removed, she will be sore every single time. I trim her with just a rasp every 3 weeks to keep her at the length that works best for her and never touch her soles. On the other hand, it would take a real butcher job to make our two younger mares sore....that's just the way they are.
 

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How long ago were his feet done? The walls look too long and the balance is not good. It looks like he's due for another trim now. I'd call another farrier or barefoot trimmer right away.

Dew and white feet having nothing to do with soreness after a trim... White feed are NOT any weaker or tender than black feet.

Tell the Barn Owner that you will be managing your horse's hoof care from now on.
 

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I don't know that I'm jumping on the sole-too-short bandwagon, after seeing pictures. I'm no expert but the sole doesn't look overly trimmed to me - you can see the cracks from exfoliating sole all around the interior, and the edges looks "scraped" to find the sole plane rather than actually cut out and removed to any great extent. There is even still some excess hoof wall, I'm not inclined to think anything was cut too short.

The picture is blurry so it's hard to tell, but it looks like there is some separation of the hoof wall on either side from the quarters back. The hoof does not seem overly short and he doesn't appear to have been quicked.

I am wondering a little about the BO's involvement and her insistence for you to get your horse trimmed early when he had typically been on a 6 weeks schedule. I wonder if she knows something you don't? Did you see your horse in between the time she recommended an earlier trim and the time he was actually trimmed? Did you notice any lameness or hesitation on him then?

The extent of the limping you describe is severe for the appearance of the trim and the shape his feet look to be in. I'm wondering if there is some minor founder, or some abscessing something going on and the BO was being proactive while trying not to worry you at the same time?
 

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Should you be upset, yes.....of course, but my advice is not to necessarily change farriers, but to become more involved with understanding the needs of your horse and discuss/work with your farrier/trimmer and not just accept what your BO or even your farrier says/does if it doesn't work for your horse.
Yes. Instead of abruptly changing farriers - I would ask questions. If this farrier trimmed your horse the time before this one and he was fine - I would be tempted to see if something else has changed in the days leading up to the trim.
 
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