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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our new place has generally poor fencing, except for one smallish paddock, which is about I'd guess about half an acre or a little bigger. It is triangular and has a really nice wooden fence on two sides. The other side is a chain link fence that's maybe 3-4 feet high. It's a newer fence and is nice and solid. I'm wondering if there is any way I can modify it, rather than having to replace it. My horses are not inclined to wander, and at any rate the land on the other side of the fence is uninviting overgrown forest, so I don't think they'd try to go over it. I'm just worried about the top of it since, in typical chain-link style, it has those bare wire poky bits. Could I maybe just bend them over? Any other way I could make it horse safe?
 

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Is there no top-bar to it?
I have chainlink in my backyard to keep my dogs in but not where it concerns my horses.
My ends are all bent over back onto themselves, then there is a top rail along the entire fence that the fence actually "ties" to so it doesn't sag I guess and there is also a wire stretched the entire base so it is held tightly and firmly in place and nothing can shimmy under unless they dig a hole under the fence.

My thought would be if it is 3' high, the animals are going exploring as it is just to easy and something is going to catch their attention they just have to taste or investigate...
So, can you electrify the top ?
I've seen long plastic {don't know what they are called} but they are about 4" - 6" long, ones I saw were yellow plastic in color "extensions" that would give space between the wire and fence itself to keep animals further away..
In your case, I would be investigating installing them straight up to give added height if the fence is only 3' high or don't care how big or small...the ponies are going on a adventure, the temptation is just to great to miss for them.
Somehow to me you have to figure a way the fence appears larger to them and that it will "bite" as in electric charge if they reach, lean or get to close they can feel/sense the bite without actually touching and getting bit.
Did that make sense... :rolleyes:
馃惔...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, it does make sense, and a bright visible electric wire on top of it was the first thing I thought of. I guess I'm a little intimidated by electric fencing still.

It does have a top bar, but above that is an inch or two of exposed wire.
 

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Ouch...sounds like what I classify as industrial type fence where if someone scales it they are going to get skin ripped...

I would be really careful in what you do with that fence.
If, if you have wood posts that are higher than the fence you could nail actual wood top-board and screw a type of hanger that would prevent separation to protect your horses from piercing their skin..
Sadly, this was not engineered as a horse paddock for anything larger than a mini it sounds like. :cautious:
馃惔...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sadly, this was not engineered as a horse paddock for anything larger than a mini it sounds like. :cautious:
馃惔...
True. I think the paddock was created by the people we bought the place from. They had show dogs. The guy that built it raised minis, among other things.
 

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Mini in chain link is one thing. Horse totally different. My old neighbors kept a mother and foal in the chain link back yard and when they tried to get out the injury was horrific enough the vet had the horses confiscated. You could perhaps run the same strip used on the bottom on top as well and then slit pool noodles and cover or get wire and sew the top over and down to the top pole. I'd still run electric across the top.
 

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You also don't want tight corners for a horse to get trapped in if being chased by another. 90 degree is bad enough especially in a small space - any less and I would put a horse in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah, there is a spot where there is an angle. I could always just fence that little spot off and plant a tree there.

In my mind, the paddock would be used for (1) a rare and honestly unimaginable situation where I couldn't have them in the barn, the dry lot, the pasture, or the woods, (2) a spot for someone who needed to be isolated, say if I ever get a rescue, or (3) a spot for one of them if they have an injury that warrants it. I guess (4) when I need the grass cut down, LOL. But I guess I wasn't clear that I wasn't planning on using it a lot.
 

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We have done that to several corners even in the big fields it makes two obtuse instead of the one 90, smoothing it out so there is no spot to trap them. My SIL reminded me her doofus TB hung himself up on the 6 foot chain link their HOA insisted on for front perimeter fencing. They are in a residential neighborhood zoned so they can have up to 2 horses if they own 2 acres.
 

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One thing comes to mind is if you had a source of plastic pipe, roughly 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Pipe could be plumbing or electrical. Using a table saw set blade about 1/2" high then rip a slot along it. That pipe could then be slipped down over chain link.
If the concern was it coming off zip ties are cheap, places like Harbor Freight...zip tie every 5ft or so.

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I would put hot fence over top of chain link to make it higher. I'd also have hot wire about mid way down on fence, to keep horses away from it.

With hot fence over top of chain link make sure horses ,can't stick head neck between hot wire and chain link fence.

All my woven wire fencing has hot wire running along top of it. We have done boards along top, and horse just break them or chew them in half.

Hot wire is only way to keep horses from leaning on fence. Every fence line here for horses has hot wire along top an mid way down fence. It's on 24/7 horses can hear fencer unit clicking, and stay the heck away from fence.
 

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In my mind, the paddock would be used for (1) a rare and honestly unimaginable situation where I couldn't have them in the barn, the dry lot, the pasture, or the woods, (2) a spot for someone who needed to be isolated, say if I ever get a rescue, or (3) a spot for one of them if they have an injury that warrants it. I guess (4) when I need the grass cut down, LOL.
Your reasons for using it with the exception of mowing all concern me..
Isolating one from the rest, can near guarantee you are going to have someone going over, or through that fence to get back to everyone else.
Horses needing isolation often need stronger, better fencing cause if they are used to being part of the crowd they are not going to be happy being anything but..
Even mowing the grass is a time for caution as they will not be familiar with the area and fencing and alone possibly...get a goat or sheep and let them mow and keep your horses safely behind horse intended fences would be my sincerest suggestion.
馃惔 ...
 

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You have a lot of advice.
As far as the top of the fence if you still go that route I鈥檝e seen plastic drainage tile used. It comes is long flexible rolls and is about six inches in diameter and is relatively inexpensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks HLG, you've given me something to think about.

Thanks to everyone else, too.
 

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Why not run electric fencing next to it about 12 feet away? Then you can use the paddock without fear of the horses getting injured. 2-3 strand electric fencing should be sufficient.
 
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