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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys.


Last winter was extremely muddy. It was my first winter here. I'm not expecting it to be much different this year. The barn owner is working on some things to make it less muddy around the yard this winter, but I expect to have the same issues.


My mare grows a crazy thick winter coat. She gets very hairy, to the extent of having mild feathering on her legs (which is non-existent in the summer). On these areas especially, the mud gets really matted in and dried in thick clumps that are nigh impossible to get out. The legs are the biggest issue for me, as it made trimming her hooves difficult, and that's mainly what I'm looking for a solution for.


We're approaching that time of year again, so I'm trying to plan and prepare ahead of time. My barn is pretty bare bones, the only real issue for me there is that there is no hot water.


Some things I've thought about:
*Clipping: This I've pondered, but what keeps coming to mind for me is that the problem areas on my horse are usually the areas people leave unclipped - belly and legs. I'm concerned about any possibility of her catching a chill if the belly and legs are clipped. She wears a 200g turnout blanket, so the bulk of her stays mud free.
*Bringing hot water: I've thought about hauling maybe a gallon or two of hot water to the barn, mixing it with cold to make a warm bucket, and then attempting to sponge and wash the worst of the mud off.


To a small extent last winter, working on the mud clumps with a boar bristle brush helped, but only to a minute amount. It takes ages and I still end up ripping out some of her hair in the process. And any areas that I do get cleared up are usually just as bad as they were by the next week (FYI, I can only get out to the barn once a week).



Advice and suggestions appreciated, thank you!
 

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I would take a pair of sissors and cut the long hair. I wouldn't clip the legs as the horse needs the hair to keep warm but just trim off the long stuff that collects the mud. That should help with keeping the fetlocks free of mudballs.

I have taken an electric kettle out with me and just boiled up some water to mix with cold for washing; a thermos of boiling water can warm up water as well.

Goood luck, I am not looking forward to a muddy year either, it was pretty bad last year and I do feel sorry for the horses as they slog through the mud, we do put "manure pathways down for them after the ground freezes enough as the ground is so deeply rutted and they do appreciate those, they just have to go through the barnyard and then out on pasture it's not muddy.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Unfortunately, those did not work for me. They made almost no dent in the mud mats, and of course were painful for the horse when I really dug in with them. Without ripping out huge chunks of hair, it just wasn't possible, on dried mud anyway. And then with wet mud, it's even harder to get out without water.


I'm sure the shedding blades work very well on horses with a moderate winter coat. My horse is half-mustang though, and has one of those that can only be described as a 'woolly mammoth'.

This is not my horse, and her coat isn't quite that long (look at his funny beard!), but I feel that it emphasizes my point well enough.


 
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Discussion Starter #5
@Woodhaven


Thanks, I don't know why I didn't think of just using scissors to trim up the long parts. Makes perfect sense. I will do that.
 
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I’m was born in Ohio and lived there until my early 30’s, with horses.

1. I would not use the clippers on her legs or whatever other lengthy hair she grows, but I would take a sharp pair of scissors to everything and cut the hair short enough that ice balls can’t form.

No ice balls, not much mud and it will be easier to clean.

2. I bought one of these dog detangling mitts at the local Pet Smart. It’s great for bathing a horse and it’s great for cleaning the legs & manure that might be stuck on the butt:):)

https://www.petsmart.com/dog/groomi...ing-dog-grooming-glove-47346.html?cgid=100280

3. Believe it or,not, this Tigers Tongue is also great for some mud removal. Especially in the nether areas and especially for horses who are sensitive to brushing, like my horse with the fractured sacrum:)


Both horse love the massaging action on their faces.

I got one free, in an order from Jeffers or I would have never bought the next one. It is also great for bathing and well worth the seven dollars:)

It expands to about 2-1/2”

https://www.jefferspet.com/products/tiger-tongue-horse-groomer
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
@walkinthewalk
The tigers tongue looks sort of similar to steel wool? What's the texture like in comparison?


ETA: It actually looks a lot like those black shedding blocks. Is it the same or different?
 

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——-

@walkinthewalk
The tigers tongue looks sort of similar to steel wool? What's the texture like in comparison?

Not at all like steel wool, lollol


ETA: It actually looks a lot like those black shedding blocks. Is it the same or different?
Not at all course like shedding blocks either.

I have run it across my face without scratching myself:).

It is rougher than a regular sponge but conversely not rough at all.

As I said, I would have never bought one, had I not received one free when I bought something else from Jeffers. Now I have three of them:)
 

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We had plenty of mud and it was clay based.

I would hose their legs off.

As for removing mud elsewhere I found that buyin the stainless steel pot scourers unraveling them (from the middle) and then braiding several of them together.

That worked really well and even the very fit TBs didn't mind it being used even on their ticklish bits.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We had plenty of mud and it was clay based.

I would hose their legs off.

As for removing mud elsewhere I found that buyin the stainless steel pot scourers unraveling them (from the middle) and then braiding several of them together.

That worked really well and even the very fit TBs didn't mind it being used even on their ticklish bits.

Hose their legs, with just cold water from the well/tap?


Walkin's special sponge had me thinking of steel wool, so it's interesting that you had success using that very thing.
Thanks for the tips!
 
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Ditto on the tiger tongue groomer - I bought mine on a whim and it's been worth every penny. I've found it easily does the job of a curry comb and hard brush in most situations without being abrasive. It will certainly not snag and pull on long fur like a shedding blade will. It might take a while but I imagine it will slowly break up those big mud spots. No biggie if you get wet mud in it, it rinses out incredibly easy unlike a sponge or hard brush.
 

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I just looked at the Tiger Tongue Groomer, very similar to what I suggested - which works out a lot cheaper!

It must be the stainless steel pot cleaners, the steel ones are more brittle and I would worry that parts might stick in the horse.
 

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I just looked at the Tiger Tongue Groomer, very similar to what I suggested - which works out a lot cheaper!

It must be the stainless steel pot cleaners, the steel ones are more brittle and I would worry that parts might stick in the horse.
Except the Tiger Tongue is able to multitask, and there’s zero worry about buying the stainless steel wool and getting a piece stuck in the horse - or me the way my luck runs:smile::smile:

As I mentioned above, it is GREAT for sensitive skinned horses and horses with injuries. I can easily and quickly clean Joker’s nether areas, or bath him there, without him being uncomfortable:smile:

Both horses love their faces massaged with it:smile:

Also, both my dogs also like to be massaged with it but the dog with hair you can barely grab hold of, really appreciates it

As @Aprilswissmiss commented, it’s worth every penny for all the things it can do that I would have never expected it can do:thumbsup:
 
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