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Hi all,
I was wondering how you all dispose/compost your manure.. Next year we'll (hopefully) be building a concrete pad to house it, but we simply do not have the time or space to do it before this winter. I own 3 horses, so it's not an incredible amount of manure, and I'll be using sawdust/ shavings. I have neighbors who are very neat and don't want any 'waste' running of on their property (our land slops off onto theirs). I was just wondering what I could do temporarily to get it out of the way?
Thanks
 

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I don't like keeping my manure pile close to the barn due to it attracting fly's and limited space so I ended up buying a small 4x6 trailer that can be pulled by our 4-wheeler and dumping it on the back side of our property. It keeps it out of the way but is still easy to get to by truck or tractor to remove it later on. It holds about a weeks worth of manure for my 4 horses that are stalled about half the day. I have also delivered it to neighbors who needed it for their gardens... So far it works out really for us and it only takes a few minutes to dump.
 

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Sell it..... no joke people on CL advertise they have the stuff and they have people stopping by asking to scoop it right from the stalls! lol
 
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Have you never built a smudge during insect weather to drive off/kill the bugs using manure? Prairie cattlemen sometimes lay a row of old hay, straw, sawdust, and wet and dry manure and set it on fire. If built correctly it will smolder and smoke all night and the cattle will hang around it. A smaller version can be built in a 45 gal. barrel, building it in layers until about half full. It is cold smoke which rises maybe 20' in the air then settles back down toward the ground, offering animals relief from the insects. This is done during calm weather which often happens during early evening. The remaining ashes make great garden food. And NO, it doesn't have an unpleasant odor. There is almost no odor.
 

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We have a manure pile. We`re actually on our third one now. This one is way out in our field so we use the quad and trailer to haul out to it. Our first pile was closer to the yard so it was left to decompose and was turned into my current garden site - the soil in it is quite lovely for growing. Eventually our second pile will rot down and probably become another garden as well.

In your situation, perhaps you could get by with a neat pile or whip up a three sided fence to contain the manure and make it less visible. The fence would be a fraction of the cost of putting in a concrete pad. Unless your mandated by local regulations to put in a pad, I would think you could be without one. It`s been my experience that surface runoff is virtually nil in a manure pile and would only happen if you had a pelting large volume rain storm that completely soaked the pile.
 

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Have you never built a smudge during insect weather to drive off/kill the bugs using manure? Prairie cattlemen sometimes lay a row of old hay, straw, sawdust, and wet and dry manure and set it on fire. If built correctly it will smolder and smoke all night and the cattle will hang around it. A smaller version can be built in a 45 gal. barrel, building it in layers until about half full. It is cold smoke which rises maybe 20' in the air then settles back down toward the ground, offering animals relief from the insects. This is done during calm weather which often happens during early evening. The remaining ashes make great garden food. And NO, it doesn't have an unpleasant odor. There is almost no odor.
I have heard of people doing this as well with great results but have never had the opportunity to try it myself. This would be great when mosquito's and horse flies are out in full force!!!
 

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In warm weather I use a spreader & spread it on a riding lane around the property.
In cold weather when I can't use the spreader I have a pile that is removed every spring.
I have a friend who can't have a manure pile so she has an old horse trailer she uses & when it's full she empties it at my place.
Some people use a dumpster but that can get costly.
 

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I use a forced air composting system that composts horse manure in 60 days. I have a three bin system and it cost me about 60 dollars in supplies. Basically you have a bin and the blower pushes the air through the manure and breaks it down super fast, about 30 days. They you let it cook/settle/ break down on its own for another 30 days. And the viola(!) compost!

It's minimized my manure pile and my pasture loves all the extra compost!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Building-a-forced-air-composting-system/
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I have no manure, I feed textured feed, and have free range chickens. poop gets scattered as soon as it hits the ground.
 
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