The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone...I just bought a mare that I have known for about a year and a half; she was at my place for training last summer and I fell in love with her. She just came up for sale finally and I was able to buy her and I absolutely love her. She had some western pleasure training that I had done with her the summer of 2013 but not very much as the owner couldn't afford that much training for her. Her previous owner jerked on her mouth and held on her face too much, so she is hard mouthed. She's a very nice mare and has her walk and jog down very well in a loose rein, but when you give any indication that you are going to pull up on the reins to make her slow or stop, she instantly pushes her head out and down to get away from the bit. I started working on her with a snaffle and a VERY light touch to let her know that nobody is going to jerk on her anymore but I feel like I should maybe be doing more. I don't really want to use any contraptions on her but would love some advice on what would be the best option for me to get her to stop doing that. She has done it so hard that she actually pulled me with her a little bit. Thank you in advance for anyone that would be kind enough to let me know what their opinion is!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,981 Posts
She needs more lateral bending, more of your legs and seat and weight shifts to encourage her to reach for the contact and be comfortable with it. Lots of flexing, two tracking, but try to only use 20% rein, the rest should come from the rest of your body so she can become softer and reach for contact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,433 Posts
Obvious answer, stop pulling on the reins to slow or stop, use your seat:wink:

OK, she needs to accept contact, without being scared that she is going to get jerked on. What sort of snaffle ore you using on her now? not all are created equal.

AS Wares says work with lateral bending, I MAY (depending on many factors) consider her working in side reins, on the lunge for a while, ggives her a chance to play with contact without the possibility of rough hands, or even good hands jerking her mouth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,860 Posts
Might want to have vet check bars of mouth too, as former owner could have damaged those, or broken teeth for that matter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Obvious answer, stop pulling on the reins to slow or stop, use your seat:wink:

OK, she needs to accept contact, without being scared that she is going to get jerked on. What sort of snaffle ore you using on her now? not all are created equal.

AS Wares says work with lateral bending, I MAY (depending on many factors) consider her working in side reins, on the lunge for a while, ggives her a chance to play with contact without the possibility of rough hands, or even good hands jerking her mouth.

I have been trying to do that but that's how she's trained so she will slow down with the seat but eventually you do have to pull up a bit to get her to actually stop...I'm using a d ring snaffle with a copper mouth.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Might want to have vet check bars of mouth too, as former owner could have damaged those, or broken teeth for that matter?
Just had our equine vet out and floated her teeth and checked her over and he said the rest looked good after he finished.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
Good advice on the lateral work. Get the left side good, the right side good, and then she should improve in her straightness. I'd also add that "it's in the feet". The response of the feet trumps the head position, at least for now. Get those feet right and the head-slinging may evaporate without any extra effort. She'll have to re-learn confidence in the rider's hand and that could take awhile, but just keep being consistent with how -you- present your hand to her. If she's going to get it, that's probably how it'll happen. Patience! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good advice on the lateral work. Get the left side good, the right side good, and then she should improve in her straightness. I'd also add "it's in the feet". The response of the feet trumps the head position, at least for now. Get those feet right and the head-slinging may evaporate without any extra effort. She'll have to re-learn confidence in the rider's hand and that could take awhile, but just keep being consistent with how -you- present your hand to her. If she's going to get it, that's probably how it'll happen. Patience! :)

Ok thank you. I've just been working with her on trust but was just wondering if there were any other options that I should be considering doing with her that will help!:) thank you
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
Ok thank you. I've just been working with her on trust but was just wondering if there were any other options that I should be considering doing with her that will help!:) thank you
Posted via Mobile Device
You're welcome. It's a good strategy what you're doing, gathering many different ideas, techniques and points of view from different people. That'll make you broad-minded and develop a big arsenal of knowledge to draw from when you're with a horse. There's actually no limit to the things you could do to improve her overall. Sometimes when I'm riding a horse and things aren't working out, I'll just start oscillating between all the techniques and strategies I know until something starts working again!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top