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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently don't have a horse in my life, but that doesn't mean that my life is totally horse-less.

Screenshot 2020-01-10 at 12.49.08 PM.jpg

Meet my neighbors! From Left to Right: Bay Boy, Gray Girl and The Leopard.


Those aren't their actual names, but I haven't met whoever owns them and they don't have name tags on their halters, so that's what I call them in lieu of whatever their names really are. They mostly live in the big pasture right down the street from my house, theirs a big barn further along the property and I occasionally see a young man there. I assume that he's either the owner or has been hired by the owner to take care of them and the property.

All three are friendly and come over to see me whenever I walk by their pasture (I never go in their pasture, I'm not that stupid). They certainly like it when I scratch them behind the ears, under the chin and all over their necks anyway, probably why they keep coming back to visit with me since I don't feed them. (I realize that's a big no-no when it comes to other peoples horses.)

After visiting with them for nearly two years now, I have some understanding of their personalities and herd dynamics. The Leopard is The Boss, he's always the first to come over to see me and he'll pin his ears down and give the other two an ugly look if they try to push in and get some pettings from me before he's satisfied. He's very polite with me though, always stays still and lowers his head when I pet him.

Bay Boy appears to be number two and is a sweetheart. A little pushy through, as he's tried to nibble on my clothes and even my hair before, although he does back off when I tell him to do so. He's the youngest of the three, clearly hasn't been taught good ground manners and I suspect that someone at some point during his life fed him treats from their hands, as I've seen the same kind of rude, nibbling searching behavior before in horses who were habituated to being hand-fed treats.

Gray Girl is the low mare on the totem pole. Both The Leopard and Bay Boy boss her around and she's always timid to come over to me. She's very gentle whenever she does pluck up the courage to see me though, as I've been able to de-tangle burrs out of her forelock and mane with no problems.


Interestingly enough, I think Bay Boy is a Mustang! He has a freeze-brand on the left side of his neck and since Arabians and Standardbreds are typically freeze-branded on the right side of their necks (Not to mention how he looks like neither an Arab or and Standardbred) it's more or less the "default" option for his breed. One day I hope to get him to stand still long enough so I can write his brand down so I can decode it later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They are all very cute and must love getting scratches from you! I personally don't like halters left on horses, are they ever not out in the pasture?
They are and they certainly do! :) Sometimes The Leopard even nickers when he spots me and brings the others over.


I don't usually care for halters on left on horses either, but their halters are all leather, which would break under pressure or if it got snagged on something. I live in the bluegrass region of Kentucky, so seemingly every horse is turned out with leather halters here. Even foals! So it seems to be a regional "thing", because back in Florida I never saw any horse ever turned out with a halter on (And I'd never seen a leather halter too for that matter!)

Occasionally they won't be in their big pasture, but I'll see them in individual small paddocks down by the big barn. Usually by the next day they'll be back in the big pasture again though, so I assume they're only brought down to the barn for the farrier or for vet work.

Otherwise they seem to be left alone. Their always in good shape, I've never seen them look the slightest bit skinny -Even in the dead of winter- but their owner doesn't seem to actually do anything with them.
 

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This time of year, I envy you living in Kentucky. Our winter is just starting and we get most of our snow in March and April, even sometimes in May. While you'll be greening up.

I remember it being standard to pasture horses with leather halters. I only have nylon web ones now. I miss the leather. And I don't turn horses out with them.
 

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This time of year, I envy you living in Kentucky. Our winter is just starting and we get most of our snow in March and April, even sometimes in May. While you'll be greening up.

I remember it being standard to pasture horses with leather halters. I only have nylon web ones now. I miss the leather. And I don't turn horses out with them.
I have a couple of very nice leather halters from my showing days. The are hanging up in my house :smile: sometimes I wonder why I don't use them...but the nylon is so easy to care for, and is the barn/trailering halter. I use a biothane or rope halter with my snap on bridle.

So no real use for the leather except to rub and admire :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This time of year, I envy you living in Kentucky. Our winter is just starting and we get most of our snow in March and April, even sometimes in May. While you'll be greening up.

I remember it being standard to pasture horses with leather halters. I only have nylon web ones now. I miss the leather. And I don't turn horses out with them.
It certainly has been looking pretty green around here lately. But honestly, I'm actually a little disappointed! I grew up in Florida, so snow is still a novelty to me and I rather enjoyed the odd snowy day we had last year.
 
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