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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I get to see Kiya on Monday! I'm so excited! :D

But, she's had a month off. She's been turned out a decent amount, with and without one of her friends, but the turnout is just a sand arena. When I turned her out previously, she'd just stand there unless there was something exciting happening (i.e. the dog wanted to play, or one of her friends was really up). She didn't have much of a topline to begin with, honestly, though the last day I worked with her she was SO good, listening to my voice and starting to actually stretch at the canter. My giraffe, stretching, at the canter. Ahh!

How should I start off? Just some hand walking around the property, and then ground work, and then start lunging again? I have zero intentions of riding her until she's great on the ground, so it's not like I want to hop back on right away. I just wanted to see if you guys had any good suggestions. :)
 

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Is she completely broke? I've had spells of a few months not being able to ride my boy and I could hop right on and be able to do everything just fine. If this is the case with your mare you should be ok. Sure take it easy, do some groundwork to play around and such but then just get on, do some walk trot work and focus on each other, be nice and calm and you should be fine.

enjoy!
 
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I don't see why you shouldn't expect to ride the first day if she does well on the ground. Heck, maybe I'm insane, but unless he was being a butt during grooming and/or tacking and obviously had more energy than was safe to ride with, I would get straight on. Mostly I would just be careful not to overdo it. For example, I'm not going to get on a horse that has been off for a month and expect him to slide since he's not fit for it anymore. Maybe a few tiny stops from a jog just to practice the movement, but definitely not at speed. It's just not fair since they aren't correctly conditioned anymore and they could hurt themselves.

Is there a reason that you wouldn't be able to ride?

ETA: Whoops, stopped in the middle of a sentence lol. It actually makes sense now! :razz:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She is broke, but before the break I wasn't riding her, either. She knows how to w/t/c both ways, knows leads, but it's hard for her. She's shown some and apparently did a cross rail class, too. But to me, her gaits were all over the place and she just seemed panicked. I learned recently she never had down time after she was off the track, either. In the few weeks I just did ground work/lunging/lunging over poles, she settled down and became a totally different horse. She's five, but even my vet told me she has the mentality of a two year old right now, so I'm trying to take things very slowly, but not make her bored.
 

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Ah, gotcha. That makes a little more sense if she's still mentally immature then. Personally I would still get on at least for a bit after the groundwork as long as you still have her attention, or maybe give her a short rest after working her for a bit and then doing some more if she's still baby-brained. It sounds like she might've been pushed too hard too fast if she rides like that and has been shown already. You might be right that she needs to go back to the basics for a bit. :)
 
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