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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everybody,
So I went and saw the mare yesterday. She is precious. It is clear she is a mix, but it is also clear she has Morgan in her. I also will say there is def some draft influence in her blood. By looking at the size of her feet and how thick her neck/chest/and body are. She is a tank, no joke. She is also very brave. As soon as my family and I got out of our vehicle, I walked up to her and the rest of my family stood back in the background watching. She walked straight up to me, sniffed me allowed me to rub her head. I have never had a horse be so brave to walk up to me so fast and take so much interest in me like that. I rubbed all over her body, from the tips of her nose and ears to the bottom of her feet. I put pressure where a girth would set and put my arms on her back and put weight on her. She didn't even flinch. She had her one back leg cocked and relaxed the whole time until I walked her around. She leads very nice. She was very nice to be around. The only problem I encountered is the lady who owns her gives all of the horses way to many treats. They all would lip at your hands and pockets searching for a treat. But this is a problem that can be fixed pretty fast and easily. I am making payments on her until March, as I can't get a fence up until then along with a barn/shelter. So I get to go see her every Saturday until I am ready to bring her home. They've told me I could use there round pen and work her every time I go see her if I would like. My question is what can I do when I start working her with her bridle on to keep her very soft, I am very soft with my hands. But anything else that I could do would be appreciated. Also I plan on teaching her direct reining then neck reining, this sounds right, correct?
 

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have you ridden her? you cannot tell much as to what you need to do with her until you see how she is with a bit, and how much she respects the rein and listens to the rider and such. having her be very brave and come up and sniff you and all can be the flip side of a horse that is so very self confident that they think THEY are in charge and they have absolutely no reason to worry about you, since you could not possible pose a threat to their position. maybe not, but that's one way a horse can approach a new human, if they have been allowed to think of people that way.

an aquaitance of mine had a big warmblood that had always been a difficult horse to ride. Very reactive outside, but darn nice in the arena. anyway, when we went to see it, we sat down on a mounting block inside the arena, and she let the horse free into the arena. it charged around , and soon as it saw us, it ran straight toward us with great interest. I stood up as it continued to run toward me, and when it got too close, I leaped forward and flung my arms about to shoosh it off. I did NOT like the way it ran up on us, as if it owned us. I would nto mind if it approached at a walk, with its' nose out , ears forward and a questioning look , like, "ok if I come over and check you all out?". But a "what have we here in my arena?" sort of approach was not acceptable for me. the owner said something like, "oh, he's just curious about newcomers". heck no, he's rude.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have not ridden her it was 11 outside when i went and saw her. It wasn't a dominant approach to say. It was more like an investigating look like a greeting/checking out thing. Ears were forward and she walked up to me at a walk. Nothing came across rude or anything about it.
 

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The key to keeping a horse soft to the bit is not your hands, but the horse's training and submission to your cues. My suggestion would be to take this horse and start as if it were unbroke. Train it from the ground up. Start with a lot of ground training (there are plenty of threads on that), so that when you mount, the horse already knows your language and what you are talking about. Teach her everything she needs to know on the ground, then it will translate easily to the saddle, particularly respect and submission.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I did a lot of ground work with her yesterday. She had not been messed with more then being brushed and led around in a long time. She still did amazing. She yields her hindquarters and forequarters, backs up, and leads very nicely. When lunging her there were two people standing outside of the round pen watching. She was focused on me the entire time. But then again, I made it clear upon the first time I saw her that her respect is needed and disrespect has consequences. When I lunged her she turned in towards me, this is what I like to see :) We did a lot of changes in direction along with speed. After I felt she was 100% focused and ready. I introduced the bridle. Started off rubbing her all over with it from head to tail. That was no problem at all with her. So I slipped it on her face letting the bit go under her mouth a couple times. Still no issue. Then I put the bridle on her with the bit in her mouth. Still no issue. I took it off after one minute. Then put it back on and lunged her with it. No fuss at all. Brought her in to me, attatched the reins, applied a tiny bit of pressure to the left and right, both times she turned. :) Then I asked her to back up with a tiny bit of pressure and she did. I unbridled her, brushed her down. And ended the day on a great note. I could not be more pleased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sounds good, like she's already had some good training. I wouldn't personally lunge with a bit(of course you may just mean she was wearing the bridle while lunging...).
Yes, I mean she was just wearing it while free lunging.
 

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Hi everybody,
So I went and saw the mare yesterday. She is precious. It is clear she is a mix, but it is also clear she has Morgan in her. I also will say there is def some draft influence in her blood. By looking at the size of her feet and how thick her neck/chest/and body are. She is a tank, no joke. She is also very brave. As soon as my family and I got out of our vehicle, I walked up to her and the rest of my family stood back in the background watching. She walked straight up to me, sniffed me allowed me to rub her head. I have never had a horse be so brave to walk up to me so fast and take so much interest in me like that. I rubbed all over her body, from the tips of her nose and ears to the bottom of her feet. I put pressure where a girth would set and put my arms on her back and put weight on her. She didn't even flinch. She had her one back leg cocked and relaxed the whole time until I walked her around. She leads very nice. She was very nice to be around. The only problem I encountered is the lady who owns her gives all of the horses way to many treats. They all would lip at your hands and pockets searching for a treat. But this is a problem that can be fixed pretty fast and easily. I am making payments on her until March, as I can't get a fence up until then along with a barn/shelter. So I get to go see her every Saturday until I am ready to bring her home. They've told me I could use there round pen and work her every time I go see her if I would like. My question is what can I do when I start working her with her bridle on to keep her very soft, I am very soft with my hands. But anything else that I could do would be appreciated. Also I plan on teaching her direct reining then neck reining, this sounds right, correct?

Coming up to you to be greeted is not bravery on her part but could be a horse that has never been mistreated and one that just plain likes people.

But thinking this is bravery? You are wrong.

And you need to ride her too, so you get a feel for her.
 

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The key to keeping a horse soft to the bit is not your hands, but the horse's training and submission to your cues. My suggestion would be to take this horse and start as if it were unbroke. Train it from the ground up. Start with a lot of ground training (there are plenty of threads on that), so that when you mount, the horse already knows your language and what you are talking about. Teach her everything she needs to know on the ground, then it will translate easily to the saddle, particularly respect and submission.

A heavy handed rider will make a nice horse hard mouthed and ruin it.

Soft hands do keep a soft mouth. All of the training and cues in the world do nothing when you have someone hamfisted on the reins.
 

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She walked straight up to me, sniffed me allowed me to rub her head. I have never had a horse be so brave to walk up to me so fast and take so much interest in me like that.
That is typical Morgan. They are generally known to be well natured and interested in people. My mare does the same thing.
 
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