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I have already posted this in the western section, but english is no better. There are many ways of mounting english, the most common I have seen is to grab either the mane/neck, which is much better than holding the clearance of the pommel, and the cantle and swinging up. This method is still incorrect.
An example of mounting incorrectly:
badmountA.JPG

Mounting this way pulls the saddle out of place and causes all the riders weight to push against it. It pulls the horses skin, puts excessive pressure on the withers, and can even cause damage to the spine.

To reduce the risk, mount by placing the left hand on the lower neck and the right hand either on the pommel, or holding the panel on the opposite side. Place the left foot into the stirrup and use the right leg as a spring, pull with your left arm, using it to help prevent pushing into the stirrup too much and distribute the weight. This method uses all four limbs to help balance and distribute weight, making it easier on the horse, the rider and even the tack.

Here the rider is mounting correctly (it is difficult to see, but her right hand is reaching to the opposite side):
goodmountb.JPG

This method is one of the best to use for mounting from the ground, even so, I highly recommend using a mounting block. It is one of the best tools to help keep horse and rider safe while mounting. Another excellent tool is having someone hold your opposite stirrup, or getting a leg-up. If no one is able to help you, and there is no mounting block, dropping the stirrup can be helpful.

I hope this is useful.
 

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Hello i am shocked at that because i have to admitt i do that alot! at least i know now the right wat! it was very intreqing ThankYou!
 

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i learned at a riding clinic that if you mount from the ground it takes your horses back muscles 15 minutes to return to their normal state

i never mount from the ground unless i have to ! i normally dont even put a foot in the stirrup to get on with a block, but my mounting block is also really high.
 

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^^ I love the tall mounting blocks. They're soo much easier.
I never mount from the ground, ever. I actually cant do it lol. I need at least a stump or something.
 

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I find mounting correctly and incorrectly is a bunch of crap, no offense. I think every horse should learn every different way a person could mount or dismount.
 

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If a horse is in pain then you should be more careful. But if you are mounting and dismounting carefully then it won't happen. I mount from both sides and even from my horses butt. He has never, nor has any horse I've ever ridden had a problem with pain while mounting/dismounting. And by no means do I mount and dismount by the book.
 

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I agree with the above poster... I get on quietly and softly, grab a little mane (hardly use it though), left foot in stirrup and swing up. I do use a mounting block, but it's only a small step stool. It's hard for me to image that the seconds it takes to get on can really do all that.

I may be wrong. But I have never heard of this, and find it hard to believe. For me it falls into the same category as the the advise i got from a parelli lady at my old barn, who told me that my rubber d snaffle was hurting my horse's mouth.
 

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obviously they all have to learn how to be mounted from the ground, but that doesnt mean you have to do it every time you get on. imagine being a horse & having someone [who is probably over 100lbs] get on from the ground, how would your back feel ?
 

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I always mount the 'correct' way you described - Any other way and the saddle slips. I can mount a horse with a reallllly loose girth and not move the saddle to the side by mounting the way I do.
 

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I weigh 110 pounds and my horses have never had a problem with their backs. Horses are stock/pack animals, 100 pounds properly distributed to a healthy horse is nothing.
 

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But the weight isn't properly distributed when you are mounting.

My horse had back issues from a badly fitting saddle and overweight rider. One way I could tell when it was getting sore (before we completely fixed it) was when he would dip his whole bacl end when I mounted. I would immediatly get off and stop riding - But it shows that mounting does affect the back, as he could be ridden 'seemingly' normal for a while before showing his soreness during normal riding.
 

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I would think this is something like an article I read recently on how to do barn chores so as not to hurt your back. (This may seem completely off-point but bear with me.) Repeated twisting motion with weight (such as twisting to toss dirty shavings into the wheel barrow) is bad for your back. As is carrying weight unevenly (ie carrying a full water bucket in one hand so that all the weight is on one side of your body). Can we do these things? Sure. Does it hurt at that time? Maybe, maybe not. But if you continue to do these things you'll probably end up with back problems. So even if you think your horse can handle you mounting from the ground "the wrong way", it might end up hurting him in the long run.
 

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I weigh 110 pounds and my horses have never had a problem with their backs. Horses are stock/pack animals, 100 pounds properly distributed to a healthy horse is nothing.
I'm 104 pounds but I still worry about bothering my horses back. I can't mount very well from the ground, for that reason I almost ALWAYS use a mounting block.

There ARE right and wrong ways to mount.
 

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Actually, if you want to get technical about properly mounting a horse, according to a lot of trainers out there you should be facing the REAR of the horse, not the front when you get on.

George Morris writes, "By facing the rear, you are in a position to watch the horse's actions and judge the time t mount and also to brace against him and prevent him from moving forward if necessary. I do not agree with those who advocate facing the front or the side of the horse when mounting. This position, I've found, diminishes the rider's strength and agility, often resulting in an unsuccessful attempt to mount or worse yet, a loose horse."
 

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I mainly always get legged up, is this OK?
Its when we dismount, my mare sometimes sidesteps or looks a little nervy.
 

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getting legged up is fine =]

do you use the stirrup when you get off ?
 
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