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Moving my horse to be on 24/7 turn out (with run ins) and I am looking for advice on how to make this a smooth transition for her. When I first got her she was on ALMOST 24/7 turn out however it has been about 6 years since then. I usually never blanket her in the winter because she grows such a nice thick coat but Im considering purchasing a blanket just in case we get multiple days of REALLY cold weather since she will be out all the time now.

Would love advice on transitioning her outside all the time and blankets! thanks!
 

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My horses are free to come and go 24/7. They have stalls and a covered overhang.
If your horse has a good winter coat, and is not ill or very thin, I would not blanket. It mashes down the hair and the natural insulation is lost. If you start blanketing you will need to continue through the winter. However, I think every horse should have a blanket available for emergencies. It's part of the equipment needed for basic horse care.
 

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She'll probably be just fine. Turn her loose and just keep an eye on her, but I'll bet she likes the freedom again.

If she normally grows a good winter coat and she has a run-in, you probably won't need a blanket either.
 

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I think she will adjust quite fine. :) She will probably enjoy it. :D More time to enjoy being freee! :lol:
A blanket would be OK depending on how cold it is. You can keep a watch on her & you'll know when she needs one. If her coat is really thick it may not always be necessary.
 

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Open the door and let her go. As far as winters and blanketing, Ohio, I'm sure has tougher winters than south Missouri, but I think she'll be alright as long as she has places where she can get protection from the north wind and ice. I have noticed some of my horses will shiver the first cold morning, then they seem to get use to it.
 

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What are your winters like? Rainy or snowy mostly?

Horses seem to do better in snow than in rain. The snow can sort of sit on top of the coat, but rain tends to soak through and they can get really cold.

The other issue is the run-in shelter; does your horse have to share it or does she have her own? If she is sharing the shelter, how many horses have to use the same one? Many times I have seen one horse be in a shelter and not let any other horses in.
 

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What are your winters like? Rainy or snowy mostly?

Horses seem to do better in snow than in rain. The snow can sort of sit on top of the coat, but rain tends to soak through and they can get really cold.

The other issue is the run-in shelter; does your horse have to share it or does she have her own? If she is sharing the shelter, how many horses have to use the same one? Many times I have seen one horse be in a shelter and not let any other horses in.
I agree with this. Yesterday, we had crazy weather. It rained and went up to 17C in the afternoon, then the temps plumeted to below freezing. I blanketed both horses, which is rare for me! But a) we've had a really warm fall so they're not used to the cold yet and don't have a thick winter coat. b) they were very wet from being rained on all day, and that water was going to freeze on them, chilling them to the bone. Tonight, the temps are just as cold, but I didn't blanket because it's a dry cold.

I have often seen my mare with a crust of snow on her, and she couldn't care less. She will stand out in a blizzard. My Arab gelding on the other hand, barely pokes his head out of his stall door (their stalls stay open so they can come in and out as they please). Every horse is different, and conditions vary so much. Wet cold is much worse than dry cold, or even snow. You really have to monitor the situation and adapt accordingly. As @AnitaAnne says, watch the other horses, if any, to make sure they are allowing your horse in the shelter. Same with food and water. The new horse is often the odd one out.

As for being out 24/7, I don't know any horses who would have a problem with that. It's how horses were meant to live in my opinion.
 

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I've taken in dozens of horses who were used to being stalled most or all of a day and they never had trouble with going to full turn out. On the other hand, taking one who is used to being on full turn out and having to stall them... I have to watch for 'stocking up,' changes in appetite and bowel habits, boredom, bad attitudes.

I only stall a horse if absolutely necessary (medical reasons) and then watch them closely.
 

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Our oldest halter mare was born in a show barn and spent a lot of time stalled in her young show years. After her show years, she was turned out 24x7 as a brood mare. The only difference in her behavior compared to our other horses is that she LOVES her shelter when it's raining, running to it when the drops start. If it rains for a long time, her stomach does finally tell her to head back out, though..there are priorities, after all ;-)
 
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