The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys! My mare as three white socks and mud fever on those three pasterns. Anyone have experience with treating mud fever? I tried picking the scabs off and shaving the hair around it, treating it with blu-kote anti-fugal and rubbing alcohol but it hasn't worked. What should I do? Does mud fever hurt horses/hinder performance? Thank you all. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Welcome to the club! I'm in the same boat but thankfully only one hoof to treat. I tried an antifungal spray for a while and then ickthammol cream and that cleared it up for the most part. I'm having trouble getting the last few spots cleared up though. Someone suggested washing in ivory soap. Let damp dry and coat with baking soda. I'm only two days in so I don't have any results yet for that.

I didn't have luck taking the scabs off. My mare is SENSITIVE! I have not seen any lameness issues because if it but her case wasn't extremely bad.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
Uh bummer, hate dealing with this problem. The area will become raw and tender if you cannot protect it and dry it out. The best solution I have found is to wash the area, the scabs that don't come off just leave them, let it dry and then apply a product called nu-stock. It has sulfur in it and oils that that will help protect and soften the scabs. The sulfur acts as an antibacterial and antifungal. If you cannot find nu-stock then you can mix vaseline with sulfur powder and some tea tree oil if you want. Good luck to you and your horse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Sorry to hear about your horse's problem. I've dealt with a few situations myself and here is what I found worked.

First off Mud Fever is just another term for Rain Rot on the lower portions. It's an opportunistic bacterial/fungal infection that is naturally in the environment so winter is not the only time it occurs. It's just more likely.

Aside from the wet muddy conditions of winter the other primary factor is likely a vitamin and mineral deficiency. Vitamins A, D, E and, copper are neccessary for the immune system to combat the infection. Treating it topically is only half the battle. You also need to treat it from the inside out. Otherwise it will be an ongoing struggle.

You can do a liquid vitamin A form or you can just feed a bunch of carrots. I prefer the carrot route and it has worked miracles! No issues with getting them to eat their medicine either. hehe Plus, with vitamin A there is a toxicity level whereas with carrotine (carrots) there is not.

Carrots- Look for the "juicing" carrots in the 25lb bags. You can feed those liberally and he won't OD. You'll see a marked improvement in his skin, coat and eyes etc.

Trace minerals- get a mineral salt lick but not the red colored ones. They have way too much iron which interferes with uptake and impacts the hooves negatively.

As for drying and topicals, I'm a fan of Diomataceous Earth, Gold Bond Medicated Powder, Bentonite Clay and Oregano powder.

Diomataceous Earth (*food grade) -50 lb bag at the feed store for apx. $30 You'll have it for a long time. I sprinkle it all over their stall floor and even dust them and the house pets for pest control. Wiped out the dogs fleas!
Gold Bond Medicated powder -any grocery or drug store *you may not want to use this is there are open sores as it may sting a bit.
Bentonite Clay - the feed store may carry it or you can check with herbal and suppliment stores, price varies but it's pretty darn reasonable.
Oregano Powder - try the same places as the bentonite clay, or just smash up some dry "seasoning" oregano from the grocery.

Mix the ingredients together and "powder" the afflicted areas.

diomataceous earth is great for about a million things and can even be sprinkled on their food for internal parasite control. It will act as a drying and sanitizing agent. Look it up to find out about it.
Bentonite clay will draw the moisture out and away from the skin.
Oregano is an incredibly powerful natural antibiotic.
Gold Bond Medicated- it's kind of the dry replacement of Listerine. Which in this situation, you want dry as much as you can get.

helpful info on the basics
Mud fever: Recognise, treat and prevent it | Features | Farmers Guardian

Best of luck for you and your horse!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Thank you very much! I will try that.. Did the scabs fall off on their own at all while treating?
They did but it took awhile. She was very sensitive if I touched them while they were dry. I find that during washing they will come off a bit more but i haven't been pulling them off. Just gently sliding off any loose ones.
Posted via Mobile Device
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top