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Mustang owners what are they like? what the most common colour for them. I don't own one. but id like to again what are they like please reply
 

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They are amazing and very loving. They come in every color of the rainbow! Mine is a complete doll, very intelligent and even a bit jealous of any other horse that come near. They seem to bond really strongly with you when you get their attention. He is around 15 hands, bay, gelded.(he is my avatar)
 

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They are wild and not best for beginners.
 

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They are not for beginners! They have high self preservation and are great thinkers!
With that said, I truly enjoy working with Mustangs! They are strong, sturdy, easy keepers, retain almost anything you put to them immediately...good or bad! They have no quit! Which also could be good or bad.....hence the not for beginners!
IMHO...they can't be "cowboyed" once you loose their trust... you might as well hang up your hat!
If you really want to get involved with Mustangs, take the time to learn how they communicate with body language! Learn how to be the "boss" by their standards not ours!
Find a Mustang trainer who may be willing to coach you from the ground up! If the trainer really cares about the breed, they will be more than willing to help out another Mustang enthusiast!
Good luck!
 

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Agree with all the other posters, certainly not for a beginner unless you find one that is older and has been very well trained. They can be found in every color though some colors are more common like bay and sorrel. They are sturdy horses and their conformation may not be perfect compared with domesticated horses, but they are bred for soundness. Normally, those with confo faults that create an unsoundness don't survive the wild.
 

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Well I would have to disagree with the above post, I have had and trained quite a few mustangs that came from the blm right off the range and yes it does help to have some experience, BUT I have also seen newbies get one, and through thrust and a gentle manner end up with a totally awesome horse... So to say that they are ONLY for experience people is wrong.... Can they hurt you, of course, so I say you need to have common sense and understand a little about a horse, and also when you go get your 1st one, talk to the BLM employees to have them help pick out one that has been known to have more of a calmer personality... also take someone who knows how to read a horse when in a herd, that way you make sure you do not pick a dominate one, which usually tends to be a mare.... gelding usually come around way soon, but it really all depends on the horse... my 12 yr old daughter gentled one in 3 days, and was riding her within the month... I only gave a few suggestions here and there but she did it all herself .. experienced yes, but only as much experience as any 12 yr old can have that was raised with horses.. she just has a way with them.. but as a former BLM volunteer compliance person, I have seen many people adopt them that had little or NO experience and did just fine.... Just remember the can hurt you like any other horse and until you gain their trust, some can be downright aggressive when you start working with them, but it only comes from their survival instincts... patience, time, and teaching them that you are the lead horse by getting their respect through pressure and release will get you a lifelong loyal mount!!
 

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i have wild horses! check out my blog the wild horse project

the actual first steps of getting them haltered and handled are probably not for beginners but once they can be handled they are the calmest and most sensible and versatile horses i have ever worked with!

really awsome it is just such a thrill working with them

probably if you were to get one your self and are novice get a younger one or a mare, keave the colts to proffessionals

i say go for

there are also lots of people who train them then sell them this could be an escellant option for you
 

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They come in EVERY color and all sorts of conformations and dispositions. I disagree some mustangs are great for beginners (granted that they are trained first not my first horse the unbroke out of the wild mustang). You can get any type you want, draft, light, stock they're all represented in different herds.
 

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I agree with uppidycowgirl. Not all mustangs and "NOT for beginners." Especially if you have one trained by a professional or work with a professional. I worked with a trainer who specializes in mustangs and while I had had some experience with horses before this, it was mostly 'get on and go' kind of "experience." - I rode some of her mustangs that she had in for training on their first trail ride and never felt more comfortable on a trail horse.

Of course, get help, but do not be turned off on all mustangs Just because you're a beginner.
 

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What I said was "certainly not for a beginner unless you can find an older one that is well trained". A beginner has even less business with a mustang fresh from the prairie than they do an unbroken stock horse. Once in a while, people get lucky and get them broke without any serious injury or issue, but they are just what I said........lucky. What I was trying to avoid is someone who is new to horses going out and adopting one that was just captured by the BLM. That type of thing is a catastrophe waiting to happen.
 

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What I said was "certainly not for a beginner unless you can find an older one that is well trained". A beginner has even less business with a mustang fresh from the prairie than they do an unbroken stock horse. Once in a while, people get lucky and get them broke without any serious injury or issue, but they are just what I said........lucky. What I was trying to avoid is someone who is new to horses going out and adopting one that was just captured by the BLM. That type of thing is a catastrophe waiting to happen.
Agreed!

i agree with the other posters. We have 3 mustangs. All adopted from the BLM. Our newest one a gelding named Foster was adopted as a yearling and we got him as a two year old hes coming 5 now and I just love him! Our other two we got from a BLM auction. One is a 3 yr old dark gray gelding named Jackson and the other is a 7 yr old dun gelding my hubs bought for himself named Dusty. They've all been super to work with and very very smart!

But as everyone else has said they are not for beginners or everyone for that matter. When they bond they generally only bond with ONE person. Dusty is 110% Matts horse but he does let me love on him and ride him (since im his trainer XD) but we dont have the same connection that I have with Foster and Jackson since hes very tightly bonded with Matt.

I have to also agree that they are easy keepers! I have yet to have any kind of medical problems with our 3. And they can go every other month for the farrier with NO problems! I was surprised!

If your set on owning one I would suggest getting one that is already gentled and started. Or if you REALLY want a wild one get with a good and reputable mustang trainer. And keep in mind it could take hours, days, weeks, or month before he allows anyone to touch him let alone throw a saddle on him. Mustangs fresh off the range are not for you if your impatient! Trust me it dosnt work. You cant force them into accepting you. But the moment they FINALLY allow that first touch its a feeling so amazing! Its worth the wait! So be ready to take it slow. As with all horses, they are allllll different so what might take months with one might take days with another :)

It took Jackson 5 months before he would let me touch his hip without him pinning his ears and cocking a back leg...But the first time he let me touch his rump I pretty much burst into tears lol Prime example of patience paying off!

If these guys have taught me anything as a horse women/trainer is to have patience! No reason to get into such a hurry and rush a horse into something new. especially with the wild ones.
 

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As in all other topics, this one is no different, people should just agree to disagree.. :) I have seen unhandled domesticated horses act worse then most of the mustangs I have gentled.. And know many beginners that have done wonders with them... I don't think they were lucky, they were smart in what they chose to take home from the BLM and they did their research... and most of all they were will to listen and learn from more experienced horse people.. Like I said, yes they can hurt you, but so can any horse, and I have found that very few actually will challenge you once you establish that you are the leader.. it all depends on the attitude of the horse you choose.... the wild horses need all the help they can get and if matched with the right person whether that person is a beginner or an experience horse person, they are amazing mounts!!! As far as bonding with one person, I would have to disagree, I think the more they are exposed to different people they tend to adjust well to more then one handler... but then again, it all depends on the horse and how it is introduced to new things and situations...the following is a post from a different topic about mustangs...

My daughter and I have adopted 8 wild ones, all untouched, other then when they were branded by the BLM.. All were different when it came to gentling, some took longer then others, their ages ranged from a yearling to a 5 yr old mare.. most were 3 to 5 yr old mares and I did adopt two geldings... all gentled out really nice and were placed in good homes.... I still wish I would had kept a couple of them, but feel that it was my mission to get them started so they could go on and become nice horses for a deserving owner...
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I absolutely love my "wild" mustang! She is an easy keeper, has nice large bones, very sure foot, rock hard hooves and will push through anything! I also love how much forward momentum she has out on the trail. I feel like I don't have the typical mustang because she isn't flighty at all and would rather stand her ground than back away from something that is scary. To me, she is worth her weight in gold!
 

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they are one of the most beatiful horses (i think) my mustang Camanche is very high spirited, head strong, & he has made himself the leader of the head lol! but when it comes down to rideing, he is one of the best cattle driving horses, & very sure footed!





I love my mustang Camanche <3 :)
 

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How tall is Camanche? He is such a stocky, beautiful beefcake:) Cameo is a great and driving cattle as well. She really enjoys cutting.
 

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How tall is Camanche? He is such a stocky, beautiful beefcake:) Cameo is a great and driving cattle as well. She really enjoys cutting.
he is about 13.2. and camanche also loves cutting, hes ur all around cattle horse, altough he does have his days where he likes to be the boss lol (hes my head strong dude :) <3
 

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when i first got him he was far from beefcakes, you could see his ribs :/
 

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Depends on the type, I have a Sorraia Mustang and they are very weirdly built and are always supposed to be Grulla. The are amazing athletes but can have horrible attitudes. They are a very rare breed and mine is from South Dakota, check out my horses, his name is Straight Shooter.
 
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