The Horse Forum banner
1 - 20 of 269 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
I just wanted to say that the after looks great. We struggled with a farrier who had been doing my horses feet for 20 years. His Motto was always slap a shoe on it. Well hubbies horse became Navicular (proven with x-Rays) we he trimmed and shoed her according to how he felt it should be (underrun heels push her up on her toes) she got thrush so bad that she could not walk at all. He then told us to put her down or drug her and take her to a sale! I was done. Found a fantastic barefoot trimmer - who did just as your farrier did - explained everything. We had her do feet for all 4 of our horses and the difference was amazing! I then took a class and do my own trimming. She comes out every 6 weeks and checks them and makes corrections. Our Navicular mare is doing fantastic barefoot and with her boots- and my gelding has not had an abcess since we switched (we used to get 2 a year at least) Good for you for looking for a better solution!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Some Sr horses go down hill pretty quickly when things are not quite right. I am experiencing that with my 23yr old paint mare this spring. I have almost doubled her grain since Feb and have most definitely doubled her hay (and she eats in a Hay CHix slow feeder net) She is just now starting to show a very slight gain in her weight. I know her teeth etc are fine - I had this happen with another older mare I had who was about 25 when she became harder to keep weight on. My advice is to keep adding grain or a weight builder supplement and get on the barn about the hay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Not an expert but her hinds still look long in the toe and this could be because of under run heels. Can you do bottom shots when you are at the barn next?

I have always been told that the angles are determined by the horse and not a "set angle for every horse" her angles from the front look OK but the backs look off to me. This could cause tripping and dragging in the back and cause her back and hips to get out of whack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Hay belly is just dense fiber build up so I would not worry too much about that.

I was just going back in the post and read about the Bells. I for one am anti-bell. Most wildlife will hide in the brush - birds included and bells do nothing more than make them hide more. It will not flush them out.

We have had some terrible experiences on the trails with riders with bells and how other horses reacted to them. Unless your horse is desensitized to the bells it can be very scary. Our vet was on a trail ride this spring and asked the person behind him to remove the bells as it was causing issues with other riders on the ride. If you ride a lot on your own I don't think it is much of an issue - but for me personally I ride at a lot of state parks and meet and pass other riders and many of us have had Bell issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Egrogan- I am glad your encounter went well with the hunter. We too stay out of the fields etc when hunting starts. We have had many dead horses and cows in my area of the years - hunters from Chicago come out and shoot anything that moves- and we have a lot of landowners that rent to big city hunters. Bow hunting starts here this weekend (deer) we are still in quail season as well. We all wear orange vests when we ride.

As for bells - my horses will startle in place and get very high headed snort and try to go the other direction very quickly. Most wild animals will take to cover when something strange approaches - and will flush out. I am really on the fence on if I believe that bells will make them run before my horse and I get there to flush them out. But I also ride almost exclusively in state parks in my area and surrounding states. The deer and turkeys there are so used to horses that we have ridden close enough to almost touch them!

When riding in fields in my area it is usually not a time when they are out grazing so we are pretty safe. Fall is here and the fields surrounding my home are going down 1 by 1 - I am looking forward to some great rides around home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
I need to move to PA! We allow hunting all days during hunting season. And the state parks will mark off some trails with tape saying do not pass this point Hunting in Session. We all wear orange vests when riding this time of year.

And as others have said it is not the "local's we have issues with it is those from the big cities (Chicago- Iowa City-Madison) that come out "to the country" and think we all love people to hunt on our land. Not True!!!

I live in a small rural village (150 people) and my pasture is within the village (8 acres) and we have had hunters walking the fence line of our property. When asked what they were doing they just said trying to track deer. No one pays attention to the purple fence posts (no trespassing sign) they just walk around.

It can be scary here in the fall!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
When I worked with my gelding on side passing I worked from the ground first using a dressage whip. Tap tap tap to get him to disengage the hind quarter, then same for the shoulders. Once we could do it from the ground I worked with him from his back still using the tapping method - once we got that solid from the saddle I removed the dressage whip and used my legs to tap and used my inside rein to stop forward movement and outside rein to tilt nose the direction I wanted to go. I rewarded every teeny tiney step.

My gelding caught on pretty quickly and we could sidepass within a few training sessions. He never became really fast sidepassing (Ala Clinton Anderson) but was proficient enough to get us out of any issues on the trail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Keep up with the tapping - it took my geling a bit to do it away from the fence. once we mastered the fence and away from the fence I used the tap from the saddle with the crop and then eventually my leg.

Is it possible they are rough with her legs. It is hard to hurt the bottom of the hoof unless you pick at the frog sulcus. But fall pastures can be very rich.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Agree with Phantom on all points. Our horses wear fly masks while in the trailer. Since she does not trailer a lot you may not be able to load her with the mask on. Go ahead and put it on once she is in the trailer.

We generally drive an hour or slightly more each time we trailer and do not use leg protection. We have a slant load trailer but do tie all of our horses and use a "clip" or a trailer tie that will unsnap if the horse struggles.

Don't over think this. She will do just fine - the more nervous you are the more nervous she will be.

And I like that the new BO reached out to you. This is a good thing! Just try to relax
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
So happy for the Izzy updates! No help on blanketing as we go the woolly mammoth route at our house. All horses have a 15 X 15 run in shed but more often than not they are standing out in the weather at the end of their runs when it is feeding time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
I would personally cut back on her grain a little and talk to the BO about weight. She is an older mare that did not winter as well as you would have liked last year. Explain that to the BO and ask for suggestions or have her keep an eye out on her weight.

for me personally - I prefer my oldsters a little too round than a little too thin. I have an 18 and 19 yr old now. One an easy keeper and the other not. I find it much easier to ride some extra weight off in the spring than to constantly adjust feed to keep the 18yr old at a decent weight.
 
1 - 20 of 269 Posts
Top