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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This week i noticed rings around my pony's hooves. I dontknow why i didnt notice them earlier because they start at the coronet band and extend about a third of the way down. She is not lame and ther is no heat in them that i felt. She is fat (probably condition score of 4) so i am always worried she will founder. She has a round bale 24/7 and most of the time, pretty short grass because the pastures are always overgrazed (i board). She gets literally only a handful of grain when her pasture mates are feed. I am tryingto think what is causing them. About 4 months ago i started her on a supplement for "hay fed only" horses and also garlic (for flies). Could that be it? How long does it take from insult to ring to appear? I will try to get pictures tomorrow.
 

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A body condition of 4 would be under weight the higher the number the fatter the horse, 5 being ideal. The ring would be an indication of the new supplement affecting her new hoof growth. Since their feet grow faster in the summer that is a good indication that her hoof growth is being influenced by the supplement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I must have used a different scale. On the hennessey she is probably close to an 8. Do all rings represent laminitis?
 

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If she is so fat why does she have 24/7 access to a round bale and grazing??? Get her a slow feed net and a grazing muzzle. I'd start giving her 5 flakes (two AM and three PM) in the slow feed net. I'd even go a step further and soak the hay to take the sugar down. When she is on pasture grazing muzzle ALWAYS.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They do have a slow feeder net around the hay which actually i never see her eat. I board so i dont have a lot of control. The B.O. Said the only way they can decrease her intake is if i pay for stall board and they keep her inside for part of the day. They have one paddock that is mostly dirt but there are horses in it already. Will see about a muzzle but i am afraid she will get it caught in the round bail feeder.
 

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If your concerned about founder maybe its time to consider moving her to a barn where her needs will be considered more. The slow feed net isn't really limiting her consumption, its just slowing her down. The point of putting her hay into the slow feed net would be so she doesn't inhale the her designated amount of food. It would be like saying "I need to go on a diet so I'll get a smaller spoon". A smaller spoon might slow you down but its not going to help with portion control.

As for the grazing muzzle there are a few options. They make ones on a Velcro halter, of the muzzle gets stuck it will release very quickly. The other is attaching a muzzle to a breakaway halter. If your horse is anything like the smart, obese haflinger at my barn this is the better option. She learn how to pull the velcro muzzle off on the fence.
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Show us the horse ant the feet attached. No, all rings are not metabolic in nature but many are. Does your pony have fat pads that look like cellulite? Is the fat on the ponys crest hard when you squeeze it? what is this new supplement you are feeding? We need to knwo what is in it.

There are other things you can do like supplementing magnesium (see thread on the main health board) and getting more exercise that can help as well as making sure the trim is as good as it can be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Trying to attach a few pictures. She definitely had some heat in her coronet bands and I could easily feel her pulses over her sesmoid bones. Still, she is not lame (at least on soft surfaces).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes.she normally is on an 8 week schedule and so that wont be for 2 weeks. I called the farrier and asked him to come early. He is coming in a few days.
 

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If there is that much growth in a 8 week timeframe, either your farrier is not good, or you are going too long inbetween trims. 5-6 weeks may be ideal.

I'm on a every 6 week schedule, and this summer I have found 6 weeks is way too long inbetween trims. We are looking at every 4 weeks due to the outrageous hoof growth this year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
By the way, here are the ingredients for the supplement she started 4 monthhs ago. It is called Augment.

Ingredient Per Serving Per Pound
Guaranteed Analysis Per 2 oz
Lysine, minimum 450 mg 0.8%
Methionine, minimum 450 mg 0.8%
Crude Fat, minimum 1.0% 1.0%
Crude Fiber, maximum 8.0% 8.0%
Calcium, minimum 4.3% 4.3%
Calcium, maximum 4.8% 4.8%
Phosphorus, minimum 3.0% 3.0%
Salt, minimum 0.9% 0.9%
Salt, maximum 1.1% 1.1%
Magnesium, minimum 1.0% 1.0%
Crude Protein, minimum 18.0% 18.0%
Copper, minimum 50 mg 880 ppm
Selenium, minimum 0.4 mg 7.0 ppm
Selenium, maximum 0.5 mg 10 ppm
Zinc, minimum 150 mg 2,640 ppm
Manganese, minimum 100 mg 1,760 ppm
Iron, minimum 80 mg 1,408 ppm
Cobalt, minimum 0.5 mg 8.8 ppm
Iodine, minimum 0.5 mg 8.8 ppm
Vitamin A, minimum 15,000 IU 120,000 I.U.
Vitamin D, minimum 1,500 IU 12,000 I.U.
Vitamin E, minimum 300 IU 2,400 I.U.
Vitamin B12, minimum 30 mcg 240 mcg
Riboflavin, minimum 20 mg 160 mg
Panthothenic acid, minimum 10 mg 80 mg
Thiamine, minimum 30 mg 240 mg
Niacin, minimum 25 mg 200 mg
Vitamin B6, minimum 10 mg 80 mg
Folic acid, minimum 10 mg 80 mg
Choline, minimum 50 mg 400 mg
Biotin, minimum 5 mg 40 mg
Other Ingredients

Ingredients: Corn distiller's dried grain with solubles, dicalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, zinc amino acid complex, manganese amino acid complex, magnesium oxide, dl-alpha-tocopheryl-acetate, salt, d-biotin, selenium yeast, l-lysine, copper amino acid complex, propionic acid (a preservative), folic acid, choline chloride, dl-methionine, thiamine mononitrate, niacin, vitamin A acetate, riboflavin, pyridoxine HCl, calcium panththenate, ferrous sulfate, cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), cobalt sulfate, vitamin D3, ethylenediamine dihydroiodide (source of iodine).
 

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Ooow, those pictures just make me want to get my nippers and nip, nip, nip! Get her trimmed and I imagine she will even stand more square.
She is quite lovely.
And yes, a diet change can cause rings. Think back, though, about any other changes that correlate with those rings (e.g., new pasture, new growth in pasture, different quality of hay, stress, transported, etc.,.).
They make "diet feed". I know b/c I use to buy it for my mare when I fed my old gelding a lot of senior feed and she (my mare) would almost seem panicked over the disparity in portions.
If it were me, I would get her trimmed and review her diet, ensure she had all the nutrients she needs and healthy feed for her caloric needs, and exercise her. If I were truly worried about her foundering, I would work something out w the barn owner to limit any "high carb" caloric intake.
 
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