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A few months ago I got ringworm from my goat. Since then I haven't really touched him...


I checked my goat but found no ringworm so I just decided not to touch him.

I know other animals can get it, too, but I know he had it...

Does ringworm go away after a few months?
 

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Ringworm is the most recognized fungal disease in goats.

It is not a worm, but rather a fungus which usually appears during prolonged periods of very wet weather, often when it's difficult to keep the pens clean and therefore disease free.

Ringworm can be located almost anywhere on the goat's body; its appearance is that of a rounded patch of hair surrounded completely by a hairless ring. Left untreated, it gets bigger and bigger. Ringworm is contagious both to goats and humans.

Treatment involves donning disposable gloves and thoroughly washing the area with a topical skin disinfectant like Betadine Surgical Scrub. Then wipe the cleansed skin surface dry, and apply 1% Clotrimazole Cream to the affected area. Repeat this treatment daily for at least two weeks and possibly longer, until the ringworm is gone.

Don't expect the ringworm to just 'go away'. As that animal's owner, it's your responsibility to make sure he gets the proper treatment.
 

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Um, if you searched him all over and you found no spots on him then why is it that you are so sure the ringworm came from the goat?

You can get it lots of places. Yes, even from your horse and dog.
 

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I had a baby kitten with ringworm. It developed from a compromised immune system. I had to quarantine her away from the other animals until she was clear. I bathed her and treated the fungus just as speed racer said.
You can get it from many sources and its easy to cure once found. You need to find out who has it before it spreads to your other livestock.
 

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Brianne
Lots of reasons = lots of baby ringworms

Sorry I must apologise.
I love my dogs - even other people's dogs
I love my horse although not all of other peoples' horses

Goats, well my wife once bought some to keep on our small holding. The idea was that they ate the weeds around the place. They also provided goats milk. But they ate every thing.

Then they discovered where the house was - so they used to come up and say hello. They wanted to be allowed to live with us like the dogs did.
But they bleated - oh did they bleat - that noise.

Then they wandered about - so we had to tie them up and I hate having to tie an animal up - all the time. For their safety maybe tieing them up might be acceptable, after all I have to tie my horse up. But needing to tie up for my convenience - no that gives me a conscience. We did not tie up the chickens. But when tied up, the goats bleated even more.

And if anyone came to the house - they wanted to be introduced - and they bleated anyway.

No Briann for me the goats had to go. - That bleating!!

B G
 

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Why all the worry about ringworm? It doesn't hurt much and it's fairly easy to get rid of. I agree with Barry. I will give no time to a goat but I wouldn't spend much time worrying about a fairly harmless fungus that you MAY have gotten from one.
 

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Most goats that have been well raised ARE like dogs. They do want to be social and come see you, and everyone else, just like dogs. They are friendly, affectionate animals who need social contact just like anything else.

If you brought them into your care without being prepared for them (i.e a goat proof fenced area, and knowing what you are getting into) then the "hassle" ensuing was your fault, not the animals. If you tie a dog up they bark too.

No offense meant, just two cents from a goat lover who hates seeing people bring home an animal they know nothing about because they are too lazy to run their weedeater.

To the OP: Treat the goat for ringworm and pet the poor thing - or find a new home for him. In fact, treat all your animals, because it's likely spread. Just because you can't see it, doesn't mean it's not there. Like kevinshorses said, it's just a minor fungal infection, like athletes foot. Treat it, and the animals, and move on with your life. And for goodness's sake pet your darn goat!
 

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Ringworm...is just ringworm. You aren't going to die from it. I have had ringworm more times than I can count, and have gotten it from just about every animal you can imagine from goats to guinea pigs to cattle.

At the very least spray some meds through a spray bottle even if you don't want to "touch" the goat, even though you could just put gloves on. Do you just have one goat? Goats really need to be in pairs at the minimum...they get kinda miserable when its just them.

To the poster who said his goats "bleated constantly"....I have NEVER seen or heard goats bleat all the time unless they are hungry or thirsty. I have raised & managed goats for 4 years, and my goats are quiet for 95% of the day. Maybe the goats needed something which was why they were so noisy....
 

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^^

Come tell our goats not to bleat unless they're hungry or thirsty. They'll look at you and say "MEH?" lol
 

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Ty got a nasty case of ringworm back in the spring when he started shedding his winter coat. I think he got it from one of the miniature donkeys when they first got there. Long story short, my vet told me to use the Betadine wash on it and mix 1 part bleach and 20 parts water in a spray bottle and spray it at least twice a day. It cleared up pretty quick.
 

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It does vary from breed to breed how noisy goats are. Nubians are known to be very vocal, noisy goats. LaManchas and Alpines are typically your quieter breeds (again, I say typically. My fav doe only bleated occasionally, but had her volume turned up to "11" when she did) Hair goats like Angoras are typically more quiet as well. I don't know much about Pygmy and Nigerians, they kind of came on the scene later, as well as Boers, but I believe they tend to be more talkative as well.
 

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I LOOOOOOOVE my goats, they have SUCH personalities!!! The pygmy I had was super noisy, but I LOVED it. I miss his noise. We had to have him euthed last month due to bad urinary calculi :(
My other goats (9) are Nigerian Dwarves. They're not as noisy as him, but they sure do talk anytime they see us, and especially at feeding time. But I LOVE the noise they make :) I have a doe kid, she is the noisiest of them hehe :) They're so much fun!
One of mine does tricks for treats ;) Say the word cookie, and they all come running! Speaking of running, I LOVE to run as they will all follow me in a big group :) If Im' out and about the yard, you can bet they're around me, they go where I go. I've taken them on walks, too ;) No leash necessary.
I bottle fed one of them (I don't breed them, 7 are wethers and I just happen to have two does, but got this guy from his breeder still on the bottle) and I would bring him inside the house all the time when I did :)
 

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If you cannot find it on your goat, he probably doesn't have it. Search him EVERYWHERE, clean his stall, search your horse and dog, and clean their living areas, too.
If you can't find it still, you could've even gotten it from a classmate, a friend's animal or wild animal, or at a grocery store from a dirty cart. I got it once, most likely from wal*mart.
Also, Barry, Ringworm is not a worm; it is a fungal infection. Your goats, if they were dairy and noisy, were probably Nubians, which are probably the noisiest of all breeds; other breeds are quietter, and proper fencing (woven wire) would have let your goats run and prevent them from being tied. There is no reason a goat, if tame, should not get attention like a dog.
Indy:
Boers are generally pretty calm/quiet, although I had one that was a bottlebaby who had been spoiled constantly, that was quite the noisy little *******. Nigerians are, generally, aloof and quiet, but pygmies can make a racket.
 
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