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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone could help me out. My mare used to travel well then a couple years ago was stung by a bee and had a terrible time travelling ended up with cuts everywhere. Then we tried travelling again in a lorry and she scrambled again. When the trailer moves off she leans on the partition and her feet go on the wall of the trailer. It’s honestly very hard to watch, any help please :((
 

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Does she face forward or backward? Sometimes that makes a difference for horses. But, she loads ok? is she alone or with another horse? Could you put in a rubber surface. My friend's trailer has a rubbery surface that is glued hard onto the metal floor. It is really cool, offers great grip yet is 'wall to wall' and easy to hose out with water after a trip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey she faces forwards and used to travel well both alone and with another horse. The trailer already has rubber matting in it. She loads onto it perfectly and stands perfectly, but as soon as it moves she scrambles and it’s terrifying
 

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I also had a scrambler, and fortunately, just about when she started scrambling in the trailer, an article came out in Western Horseman magazine about trailer scramblers. They said to remove the partition if at all possible. I did, and she never scrambled again. They start scrambling, according to the magazine article, because they feel they cannot get their balance, and once the partition is removed, they can spread their legs sufficiently to feel safe.

They also said, if you haul lots of horses that do not know one another, you can cut your partition so that the horse has lots of room to spread its feet. Leave only about 2 feet at the top. Make sure the bottom is open. I never had to cut any partition because I only hauled my own horses, and they quickly adjusted to hauling together with no partition. As soon as I get a new trailer, I remove the partition and never use it. I have been doing this for 30 years or more. Never had another scrambler. Never had another problem with my horse that scrambled. I hope this helps.
 

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Hi,

I too was going to suggest (grippy) rubber matting - sometimes it's smooth & doesn't provide good grip - or booting the horse can provide more grip on smooth flooring too. I too was going to suggest ensuring your horse had a lot of room - when they're stuck in a narrow partition, yes, they can feel unstable & scramble. Have never had a problem with horses travelling in an unpartitioned trailer.
 

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If you remove the partition the horse will not have a solid rail/partition to lean against and they have to lean against something in order to scramble.
I trailered a horse once that only scrambled when the trailer turned to the left, this was because the horse could lean against the partition and scramble on the left side of the trailer. As the partition was about a few feet off the floor when the trailer turned right, the horse could lean against the left side of the trailer but could not scramble as the partition did not come down low enough to put his feet against. Removing the partition worked with this horse.
Trailering two horses in a trailer with no partition could be a problem is they were not well aquainted with one another.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi guys. We sedated my mare today and she had no partition yet still couldn’t stand and just scrambled and throws herself on the floor. It’s not a fear of a the box, she was in a 3.5 tonner today. It’s like she forgets what her legs are for
 

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Oh no. Super bummer. Our ideas did not work.

Nine years ago I bought a crazy mare that was difficult and dangerous. One of her terrible habits was to go nuts in the trailer. She didn't scramble, but she flailed around crazily, cutting up her face and legs. Her worst habit was when you were riding her, she would hurl herself onto the ground when she didn't like something. Whatever possessed me to think I could fix her? Well, I did think it, and I did fix her, but it took 6 long years to do it. If you want the whole story, I made a journal about her because she was so interesting.

Isabeau, the Psychomare Diva Queen | Page 12 | The Horse Forum

The bad trailer stuff is at the beginning of the journal. She's been awfully good for a long time now.

I thought removing the partition would fix her right up, just like it did my other mare, but it didn't make the slightest bit of difference. In fact, nothing I did made the slightest bit of difference. What finally worked was just time. I loaded her and fed her in the trailer every single day for 6 years. She loaded beautifully. All I had to do was head her towards the trailer and put the leadrope over her neck and she'd walk right in. But once she was in, she kicked my trailer to pieces. She'd rear and pound the sides. When I'd take her out, she'd be shaking and soaked with sweat. You'll have to read the journal to see all the different things I tried. None of them worked. I just worked with her, rode her, loved her, and finally gained her trust. I'd haul her everywhere I needed to trailer a horse--she was the one who went. I took her camping numerous times. I think what finally worked with this horse was just never giving up on her.

I have too many horses, and had a chance to place her in a wonderful home about 2 years ago. When the time came to let her go, I just couldn't do it. I had worked so long and hard and put so much blood, sweat, and tears into her training . . . and she turned out so beautifully, I just couldn't part with her.

I know this isn't really
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encouraging advice, but maybe what you are going to have to do is just do it, taking your time, spending time with your mare, and getting through it the best you can.

PS: The horse tied to the trailer is NOT HER. Just a picture I happened to take of our young mare we were training. But it shows our ruined trailer.
 

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sorry the idea of removing the partition didn't work for her, It has worked for many horses.
Knightrider has good ideas.
I did have a horse that was bad to load and I watched the Monty Roberts video on loading and did that, took some time but in a week I had her loading ok and I fed her her grain every night in the trailer. She got so she saw the trailer and jumped right in for her feed. I never tied her or closed the door just left her there and when I thought she was ready to come out I asked her to back, letting her think it was my idea. I also would turn her out in the paddock and put her hay in the trailer ( trailer was hooked up to the truck) and just leave her for the morning to go in and eat as she pleased.
Now I realize this is not helpful advice about scrambling but maybe it will get her more comfortable in the trailer and might be worth doing.
Good luck to you and your horse and hoping for many uneventful trailer rides.
 
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